Liked App Store Arguments (Stratechery by Ben Thompson)

What I wish would happen β€” and yes, I know this is naive and stupid and probably fruitless β€” is that Apple would just give the slightest bit of ground. Yes, the company has the right to earn a profit from its IP, and yes, it created the market that developers want to take advantage of, and yes, the new generation of creators experimenting with new kinds of monetization only make sense in an iPhone world, but must Apple claim it all?

Let developers own their apps, including telling users about their websites, and let creatives build relationships with their fans instead of intermediating everything. And, for what it’s worth, continue controlling games: I do think the App Store is a safer model, particularly for kids, and the fact of the matter is that consoles have the same rules. The entire economy, though, is more than a game, and the real position of strength is unlocking the full potential of the iPhone ecosystem, instead of demanding every dime, deadweight loss be damned.

Bookmarked A Framework for Moderation (Stratechery by Ben Thompson)

The question of what should be moderated, and when, is an increasingly frequent one in tech. There is no bright line, but there are ways to get closer to an answer.

Ben Thompson responds to CloudFlare’s decision to terminating service for 8chan with a look into the world of moderation. To start with, Thompson looks at Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act and the responsibility platforms have for content:

Section 230 doesn’t shield platforms from the responsibility to moderate; it in fact makes moderation possible in the first place. Nor does Section 230 require neutrality: the entire reason it exists was because true neutrality β€” that is, zero moderation beyond what is illegal β€” was undesirable to Congress.

He explains that the first responsibility lies with the content provider, however this then flows down the line to the ISP as a back stop.