Bookmarked Reporting a massacre: Why the ABC didn’t share the shooter’s ‘manifesto’ (ABC News)

Social media platforms have made some changes to tackle hate speech and violent behaviour, but they could choose to do more. They could set higher standards for removing offensive video and messages.

Free speech is unimaginable without the right to dissent — but commentators, opinion writers and politicians also have choices to make in the example they set.

In the end though it’s on all of us — in the news sources we rely on, the social networks we join and what we choose to watch and share.

Craig McMurtrie unpacks the decision by the ABC to not publish extracts of the Christchurch shooter’s ‘manifesto’. Every move made seems to have be orchestrated to grab attention. As Robert Evans from Bellingcat explains, it is an example of
Shit posting:

The act of throwing out huge amounts of content, most of it ironic, low-quality trolling, for the purpose of provoking an emotional reaction in less Internet-savvy viewers.

Zeynep Tufekci backed this stance on Twitter:

Tufekci linked to a couple of posts she wrote in response to Sandy Hook Massacre and the Virginia shooter explaining the dangers of feeding copycat scenarios.

This focus on media manipulation also reminded me of dana boyd’s discussion of 4Chan’s association with fake news.