Liked It's Time For an RSS Revival (WIRED)
The lasting appeal of RSS remains the parts that haven't changed: the unfiltered view of the open web, and the chance to make your own decisions about what you find there.
Chris Aldrich has written a useful response to this piece outlining a number of ideas overlooked as we truly move forward in regards to RSS.
Replied to Digg Shrugg by Alan LevineAlan Levine (CogDogBlog)
Born as the bastard child of Google Reader, Digg’s own spawn came into being June 26, 2013 as a ray of hope for the RSS fanatics, aiming to offer the same feature set as the dead Google parent. Digg Reader lived a placid life, not quite firmly connected with it’s parent’s products (whatever they are) but performed a yeoman’s service for the dwindling few who believed in the choice of news and information sources, rather than sucking up to the hose of some algorithm. But Digg Reader’s health was failing as many noticed the dwindling reliability and upkeep of the mobile app. It’s death was mercifully quick, it did not suffer long, yet left most wondering in its wake why it was even sick.
I totally get your point about feed readers not actually holding our information as such, I think that Inoreader takes this a step further with the ability to subscribe to feeds which can easily be stored in WordPress. Maybe there is a potential of a linksplot?
Replied to Digg is going to kill Digg Reader; what should we do now? by Bryan Alexander (Bryan Alexander)
Over to you, dear readers. Which way forward for RSS, both in the big picture and in the practical sense of which reader to try?
I am using Inoreader and love the ability subscribe to a feed. I therefore store my OPML on my site. This allows me to add and delete feeds, as well as maintain a permanent backup. The only catch I have found is that the feed does not seem to auto-refresh, so if you delete a link from your blog and therfore your OPML, then you need to remove it from Inoreader too.

I am keeping an eye on Aaron Parecki’s #Indieweb Reader too.

Bookmarked Feed reader revolution by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
It's time to embrace open & disrupt social media
Aldrich outlines some of the current problems associated with social media. This includes reducing external access (see Medium) in an effort to control the content. For at the end of the day, they are simply content management systems. What is needed though is an integrated reader that allows for the ability to easily interact. Enter the #IndieWeb and the missing pieces to the puzzle, such as webmentions and micropub.

In a different post, Aldrich extends this discussion by breaking down his workflow. He explains how he uses of Inoreader to sort through content and then saves content to his site. He also uses Calibre and Kindle to manage documents.

Adding to this discussion, Aaron Parecki has released an IndieWeb Reader which builds on these pieces and processes for an integrated solution. I think that the challenge moving forward is the simplicity of such solutions for Generation 3 and 4.

Replied to Reading blogs in 2018: thoughts and things to do by Bryan Alexander (Bryan Alexander)
If some of us like reading blogs, perhaps it’s worth trying as a first step to RSSify as much of your world as you can.  That doesn’t mean using RSS, necessarily, but adjusting things around you to follow that principle.
I recently moved from Feedly to Inoreader as I liked the ability to subscribe to an OPML file that I can store on my blog. I actually find my of me reading in my feeds, as opposed to social media streams.
Replied to Notes for #NetNarr by Profile Picture for Alan Levine aka CogDog  Alan Levine aka CogDogProfile Picture for Alan Levine aka CogDog Alan Levine aka CogDog (CogDogBlog)
I’ve been using this tool for years in Feed WordPress set ups. A common mistake, and it happened to 2 students this time around, is when I ask for the link to their blog, I get one that is actually the link to their dashboard view of their own blog, like It’s a subtle thing, but this is not the public URL of a blog. It works for them because they are logged into their own blogs. Anyhow, I added a few more checks on the Magic Box code to trap these errors (you can see a public version at http://lab.cogdogblog.com/magicbox/).
Alan, I threw a few links into the Magic Box (on the CCourses page) recently as I was just testing out a few things. I found that even though Post Kinds produces a feed, the box was not picking this up and instead giving me back the basic feed for the whole site. Just thought I’d share …
Replied to PressForward as an IndieWeb WordPress-based RSS Feed Reader & Pocket/Instapaper Replacement by Author  Chris AldrichAuthor Chris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
PressForward was originally intended for journalists and news organizations to aggregate new content, add it to their newsroom workflow, and then use it to publish new content. From what I can see it’s also got a nice following in academia as a tool for aggregating content for researchers focused on a particular area. It only took a minute or two of looking at PressForward to realize that it had another off-label use case: as a spectacular replacement for read-later type apps!
Chris, I stumbled upon your post on Press Forward whilst searching around your site. I really like the sound of it, especially in regards to better owning bookmarks and reading. Is that what you  use for your marginalia?

I feel wedded to Inoreader/Pocket at this point in time. However, I might spin up a new instance of WordPress and test it there. Can see myself using it to support deeper research one day.