Bookmarked Eight steps to write a literature review (W. Ian O'Byrne)
A literature review is not an annotated bibliography. An annotated bibliography is a document in which you briefly summarize briefly each article that you have reviewed. The literature review does contain a summary of your research, but it goes beyond the typical annotated bibliography by focusing on a specific topic of interest and includes a critical analysis of the relationship among different works, and relating this research to your work.
Ian O’Byrne summarises eight points to work through in thinking about literature review:

  • Define a topic and audience
  • Iteratively search and re-search the literature
  • Take notes as you read
  • Consider the type of review youโ€™re writing
  • Keep your review focused, but also broad
  • Think critically and be consistent
  • Develop a logical structure to your argument
  • Use critical feedback as your guide

I never knew that literature reviews were so nuanced. Along with his post on annotated bibliographies, these resources are those to save for a later time.

Bookmarked Cursive Handwriting and Other Education Myths (Nautilus)
The grip that cursive has on teaching is sustained by folklore and prejudice.
This is a deep dive into the benefits of cursive handwriting. This is another one of those ‘the way it has always been done’ stories. It is useful to read this along side Bernard Bull’s post and the Future Tense podcast which explores handwriting in general.
Bookmarked What I would like to see in online learning in 2018: 1: a theory of classroom affordances (tonybates.ca)
Under what conditions and for what purposes is it better to learn in a face-to-face context rather than online? And when and how should they be used to complement each other when both are readily available?
Tony Bates suggests that there is research needed in regards to online learning, as well as a theory of learning. I am reminded of Richard Olsen’s post on link between research and theory. I wonder where this fits with Dron and Anderson’s Teaching Crowds and Ian Guest’s investigation into Twitter.
Quoted

I do find Twitter and social media and all those communities and tribes that I belong to as really quite interesting because they sort of exist outside of this temporal nature of where I work; where my contract is and so forth. Theyโ€™re connections that yโ€™know if change five jobs, Iโ€™ve still got these connections. And many of the people that I know have changed jobs several times, but itโ€™s the connections that have remained – Aaron Davis

Quoted in Ian Guest’s postโ€‹ on Connecting, a part of his research into Professional development in 140 charactersโ€‹.