Bookmarked The 5-Step Research Method I Used For Tim Ferriss, Robert Greene, and Tucker Max by Ryan Holiday (Medium)
As a researcher, you’re as rich as your database. Not only in being able to pull something out at a moment’s notice, but that that something gives you a starting point with which to make powerful connections. As cards about the same theme begin to accumulate, you’ll know you’re onto a big or important idea.
The five steps that Ryan Holiday suggests when conducting research are:

  • Prepare long before gameday
  • Learn to search (Google) like a pro
  • Go down the rabbit hole (embrace serendipity)
  • When in doubt, turn to the classics
  • Keep a commonplace book

This continues on from Holiday’s past reflections associated with the processes of writing. It also touches on the importance of a ‘commonplace book‘.

Liked Where Boys Outperform Girls in Math: Rich, White and Suburban Districts by Claire Cain Miller (New York Times)
One way to boost achievement in math, researchers say, is to avoid mention of innate skill and stress that math can be learned. Another is to expose children to adults with different areas of expertise, and offer a wide variety of activities and books. Gaps are smaller when extracurricular activities are less dominated by one gender.
Via Chris Aldrich
Replied to Update on #IndieWeb WordPress UX Research (jgregorymcverry.com)
For the past two months I have started the data collection to help understand the IndieWeb user base and how we can help onboarding people through WordPress.
Sorry, I have been meaning to get back to you in regards to your research. Happy to help out with any surveys or anything, just not sure about the logistics.
Bookmarked Are You Blithely Unaware of How Educational Research Impacts You? by Peter DeWitt (Education Week - Peter DeWitt's Finding Common Ground)
There are teachers and leaders who believe that researchers have little to do with their classroom practice, but the reality is that what researchers do has a direct effect on everything that happens in the classroom. We may think that we work in silent protest to research but the reality is that it all trickles down into our little casual corner called our classrooms and schools. And we should stop being blithely unaware of it all.
Peter DeWitt reflects on the place of research within education. He makes a comparison with the Devil Wears Prada and the way we assume fashion changes and trends. I find this interesting as both fashion and research are often outside of the reach people and pedagogues. This is epitomised by the story of Aaron Swartz who died campaigning against research hidden by paywalls. Is it possible for all educators to feasibly have access to research or is this another example of have’s or have not’s.
Listened TER #113 – Undertaking a research degree while teaching – 27 May 2018 from Teachers' Education Review

Amanda Heffernan, Scott Bulfin and David Bright of Monash university discuss their experiences of completing research degrees while teaching, and offer advice for anyone considering pursuing a research degree while still working in a school.

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This is a useful insight into completing an education based PhD. It reminds me of a chat that I had on Twitter a few years ago with Alec Couros, Steve Wheeler, Ian Guest and Julie Bytheway.

Still not sure I’m any closer though.

Liked IndieWeb Journalism in the Wild by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
This is a generally brilliant set up for any researcher, professor, journalist, or other stripe of writer for providing online content, particularly when they may be writing for a multitude of outlets.
Bookmarked Does the old school report have a future? (Australian Council for Educational Research - ACER)
When considering the utility and purpose of student reports, it is important to distinguish what it is exactly that teachers are asked to report. The words ‘achievement’ and ‘progress’ are often used interchangeably in student reports and conflated to mean the same thing. Indeed they are highly related concepts; it is often through tracking one’s achievements that a sense of one’s progress can be measured. However, if achievement is taken only to mean the grades, scores or marks received on summative assessment tasks, then progress often appears only to mean whether the child’s standard of achievement (their grades) is improving, maintaining or declining. Where progress is understood differently – to mean ‘increasing “proficiency” reflected in more extensive knowledge, deeper understandings and higher-level skills within a domain of learning’ (Masters, 2017) – an emphasis only on reporting achievement on summative assessments would give very little sense of a child’s progress from where they began.
Hilary Hollingsworth and Jonathan Heard provide some background to student reporting in Australia. One of the challenges that they highlight is the difference between progress and achievement. I have a long history with reporting, one challenge not addressed in this post are the constraints put in place by the platforms and providers of the reporting packages. It would seem that ongoing reporting provides more flexibility. My question is what the future of biannual and ongoing reporting?