Bookmarked Why do we STILL have reports? by Matt Schmidt (What Ed Said)
We ditched ‘traditional reports’ at the start of last year for exactly these reasons. We have every child on a collaborative google sheets document shared with parents, teachers and Principal. Through this we have goals, evidence, feedback, learning stories, summative assessment, formative assessment, self-reflection, parent feedback……24/7 access……learning conversations available every term, sharing evenings twice a term….there’s a mid year and end of year summary as well to meet the legislative requirements for ‘reporting in plain language twice a year’ – up to parents whether it’s printed off or not…..Leaders just need to be brave enough to lead change and educate their communicate to come on the journey with them!
In this response to Edna Sackson, Matt Schmidt reflects upon the way that his school uses Google Sheets to support a more agile and flexible reporting. It is interesting to see the use of such tools to create more personalised solutions.
Replied to Why do we STILL have reports? by Edna Sackson (What Ed Said)

Why do governments and administrators continue to dictate not just the existence of report cards, but often the format and parameters they should fit?

What if the hours teachers spend writing and proofreading reports were instead allocated to professional learning and collaborative planning that enhanced future learning?

and…

WHY has so little changed in the four years

since I last wrote those questions?

Being in a role that supports the implementation of biannual reporting, it is an intriguing question. What I find the most interesting is how little schools are actually mandated to do. Even though they need to provided judgements (for some things) twice a year and feedback to parents twice a year (which can be in person), it sometimes feels as if we have bought into some myth that we must provide written reports and that parents want it. Even worse, everyone has a belief as to how they must look.

It has been good to see some of the schools that I have spoken to really strip back some elements, especially in regards to specialists. It always amazes me the amount of time spent by a teacher who would potentially see the children for an hour a week.

It will be interesting to see if Gonski 2.0 brings any changes, but I guess that is your point about solutions being pushed on schools. I also look forward to reading ACER’s research into the area and the general guidelines that they put forward.

Checked into Ongoing Reporting Collective - 2018 Day Two
I attended a day recently looking into ongoing reporting. It included a presentation from Hilary Hollingsworth from ACER discussing her work with the Centre for Assessment Reform and Innovation. She discussed their focus on exploring new thinking relating to communicating growth, as well as possible alternatives to traditional reporting. ACER’s areas of interest are the existing policies, existing electronic systems, existing practices, the alignment with teaching and learning, what works and what stakeholders actually need. The method involves a desk review, collection of artefacts and scoping commerical tools. The intent is to design a map of possibilities, rather than a single ideal reporting solution.
Replied to The Last and Final Days of Report Cards - Looking Up (Looking Up)
“Video killed the radio star” but what will kill report cards? This is what you’ll see after a short ride into the future in the “Educational Delorean”: Teachers and students use personal digital devices in the classroom. When learning happens it’s recorded on the device. This could be video (student does something), audio (student explains something), pictures, digital documents or written observations. Teachers and students tag the learning with the relevant expectations, add comments and save it on the server. The student receives feedback from the teacher and others, reflects and reviews. When learning is ready to ‘publish’ it’s evaluated and added to the student’s portfolio. The student’s digital portfolio is shared with parents and anyone else the student chooses. Automatic notifications are sent whenever something is added or parents can subscribe to a periodic digest. Parents or others add comments, ask questions, or just click “Like”. When the reporting period ends the student and teacher select the best work for sharing, write reflections and curate the work. Parents add comments. Growth is easily seen because previous work is already in the portfolio.
With various changes in my position, my attention has turned to students reporting. This sent me back into my social bookmarking and I came across your post again Andrew.

Do you think that the conversation has moved much? I have written about ongoing report, however I worry about the schools that do both and the burnout that this may cause.