Read Write Microcast #016 - Computer Games, Now and Then

That data-centric world seemed benign at first — smartness that helped us. We gave up data about ourselves, and the technology around us got smarter.(Genevieve Bell)

In this return to microcasting, I reflect on playing Command and Conquer and the way in which computer games have changed over time.

I still find Twitter useful but I have to be more careful on it now, especially so I don’t get mired in some toxic thread. Being able to read the threads (comments) of people you do not follow is a feature that only produces more outrage, but that is what engages people and sells advertising.

Harold Jarche


I submitted my response to Greg McVerry’s questions on Flipgrid:

  • Where do you get your Open Pedagopy Fix?
  • How do you define-co-learning?
  • How does co-learning occur in your space?

I just felt that it was a little short, therefore decided to add a longer response here:

The good news for both advertising and publishing is that neither needs adtech. What’s more, people can signal what they want out of the sites they visit—and from the whole marketplace. In fact the Internet itself was designed for exactly that. The GDPR just made the market a lot more willing to start hearing clues from customers that have been laying in plain sight for almost twenty years.

Doc Searls

A reflection on looking at cars and sharing data.

You don’t have to be “protech” or “anti-tech.” Indeed, it’s hard to imagine how someone could realistically be said to be “anti-tech” – your future is going to have more technology in it, so the question isn’t, “Should we use technology?” but rather, “Which technology should we use?” – Cory Doctorow

I attended a ‘cyber-safety’ session that suggested joining students in online social spaces. Beyond concerns with taking away another space for young people, I wonder if the solution is not saying no to technology and social media, but to provide a compelling alternative?

I have been thinking a bit about technology lately and how we define it. This short reflection is inspired in part by Audrey Watters, Marten Koomen and Ben Williamson. In the end, technology comes in many shapes and sizes.

Sometimes it pays off to think small. Think next door, down the hall, at the next meeting. Act large in small spaces. Notice who’s speaking and who isn’t. Practice not knowing and being curious. Be kind. Welcome warmly and mean it.

Sherri Spelic


This microcast is my response to the pop-up MOOC, Engagement in a Time of Polarization, currently running. I have been following proceedings, but have struggled to contribute. After trying to write a more comprehensive reflection, but not knowing where to start, I decided to ‘think small’ and just share a short microcast. For so long I thought ‘engagement’ involved measuring the number of tweets etc, but I have come to respect lurking more and more as a legitimate (in)action.

Confident – the connecting of the dots and capitalising on different possibilities.

Essential Elements of Digital Literacies

In this microcast, I reflect on automating technology and wonder if there is a limit to how far we should go.

Further reading:


Write everyday for 28 minutes for 28 days. #28daysofwriting
via Tom Barrett

Tom Barrett has started up #28daysofwriting again. This is my reflection on the idea of a habit and a sustainable blogging practice.

Further reading: