Bookmarked Programming as translation – Increment: Internationalization (increment.com)
Converting the real world into digital abstractions requires distillation. And, like literary translators, developers must understand their biases.
Alvaro Videla uses the frame of translation to understand the biases and choices inherent in capturing the world in code. Discussing the work of Umberto Eco, Videla suggests that we need to focus on ‘almost the same thing’. This act of negotiation recognises the bias and interpretation inherent in the act of coding, as well as impact this then has on the thing being described.

via Adactio

Marginalia

A translation not only alters and augments the language in which it arrives, writes Judith Butler in her introduction to Jacques Derrida’s Of Grammatology, it also affects the language in which the original was written. In his essay “Simulacra and Simulations,” Jean Baudrillard reminds us that “abstraction today is no longer that of the map, the double, the mirror, or the concept.” He expands: “The territory no longer precedes the map.” Instead, “it is the map that engenders the territory.”

Replied to What I don’t know – Colin Devroe
It is true that many assume that programmers know so much more than many of us do. There may be a few superheros out there that have the time and interest in learning “everything” but I can tell you in 25 years I’ve never met one. Even the most brilliant minds in our field usually have a focus.
Coming from the perspective of implementation, this is something I have had to learn moving into the world of development. I presumed that those around me had all the answers. What I learnt fast is that they simply had the ability to put two and two together quicker than me. The challenge I have had to face is the feeling that someone does know the implications when making a decision, which is not always guaranteed.