Listened The male glance: how we fail to take women’s stories seriously – podcast by Lili Loofbourow from the Guardian
Consider this a rational corrective to centuries of dismissive shrugs, then: look for the gorilla. Do what we already automatically do with male art: assume there is something worthy and interesting hiding there. If you find it, admire it. And outline it, so that others will see it too. Once you point it out, we’ll never miss it again. And we will be better for seeing as obvious and inevitable something that previously – absent the instructions – we simply couldn’t perceive.
Lili Loofbourow tries to rewrite the wrong that has male art is epic, universal, and profoundly meaningful, while Women’s creations as domestic, emotional and trivial. This critique of gender has ramifications far beyond fiction. When I think of music and the world of producers, it is another field dominated by males.

One interesting quote to come out of the piece was from Susan Sontag:

A famous Susan Sontag meditation on this aesthetic paradigm bears repeating: “The great advantage men have is that our culture allows two standards of male beauty: the boy and the man. The beauty of a boy resembles the beauty of a girl. In both sexes, it is a fragile kind of beauty and flourishes naturally only in the early part of the life cycle. Happily, men are able to accept themselves under another standard of good looks – heavier, rougher, more thickly built … There is no equivalent of this second standard for women. The single standard of beauty for women dictates that they must go on having clear skin. Every wrinkle, every line, every grey hair, is a defeat.”

Listened An Indieweb Podcast Episode 0 by David ShanskeDavid Shanske from David Shanske
This is a test episode of An Indieweb Podcast(working title). In it, Chris Aldrich and I talk about a variety of Indieweb topics, with the theme of Considering the User, inspired by an article we were reading.

I really enjoyed this David and Chris. It was a wonderful insight into the #IndieWeb community. A couple of take-aways:

  1. The possibilities associated with Post-Kinds. I am wondering if instead of creating additional tags and categories that I need to craft my own kinds to differentiate between podcasts and music.
  2. I feel that the future lies in the community. I concur with Chris that I do not think that my place is coding the future. Instead I think that my contribution is in testing and trialing different additions. A point that I made in response to Eli Mellen.

If theis were to become a semi-regular occurance, it would be good to have a basic summary of discussions, as well as links to support further investigations.

Oh, and in regards to ‘impact’ (something that we love in the education world), it encouraged me to add GitHub to Bridgy. Thank you for the support and community as always.

Listened IRL Podcast Episode 12: Algorisky from irlpodcast.org
On this week's episode of IRL, we sit down with Luke Dormehl, author of Thinking Machines and The Formula, to explore the impact of algorithms, on and offline. Staci Burns and James Bridle , author of "Something is wrong on the internet," investigate the human cost of gaming YouTube recommendations. Anthropologist Nick Seaver talks about the danger of automating the status quo. And researcher Safiya Noble looks at how to prevent racial bias from seeping into code
Listened Ep. 76 Live From Gray Area Foundation for the Arts Pt.2: Howard Rheingold by Douglas Rushkoff from teamhuman.fm
This week we continue with part two of our special live recording of Team Human at Gray Area Foundation for the Arts in San Fransisco. Joining Douglas on stage is cyberculture pioneer, educator, artist, author, visionary, and shoe painter, Howard Rheingold.
Howard Rheingold and Douglas Rushkoff discuss the evolution of technology from a collision between military and psychedelic culture. Rheingold discusses his optimism and belief in technology to amplify possibilities. In particular, he shares his interest in Patreon to develop shared publics. Rheingold’s ethos is captured by the following quote:

The secret to happiness is having appropriate expectations.

We still have some painful contradictions that we need to work out. The question is not about how good the technology is, but how it is distributed.

Replied to Radio #EDUtalk 07-03-2018 Loose Learners Ep 9 The State of Blogging by John Johnston (EDUtalk)
This episode explores a favourite topic for both John and Mariana – blogging. It explores the current state of things.

Thank you John for the mention. The blogger who I think you were trying to remember is Bill Ferriter. He wrote an interesting post reflecting on the myth of audience.

I sometimes wonder if people like Dave Winer and Alan Levine are the real ‘Big B Bloggers’. This is not because they curate a platform for financial purposes, which they don’t, but because they each in their own ways take blogging to the extremes of what is possible. I consider their pursuit as both cognitive and technical. I think that Micro.blog and #IndieWeb communities capture this too. This is the Big B blogging that I am interested in.

Listened Revolutionizing Education Through Student Empowerment + Student Centered Learning with Peter Hutton from Modern Learners
Templestowe College, or TC as we call it in Victoria, Australia, was built to accommodate 1,000 students. At the start of 2010, those numbers had dwindled down to just over 200. Peter Hutton took on the challenge of rebuilding the school, despite severe challenges. Today, you will get to hear the story of the past 7 years, and how Peter revolutionized one school by testing assumptions and changing the way they thought about education.
Bruce Dixon and Peter Hutton discuss the story of Templestowe College (or TC) and the new step in extending the ‘revolution’.


Image via The Age

Liked Radio #EDUtalk 07-02-2018 Loose Learners Ep 8: Generator Generation by John Johnston: Mariana Funes (EDUtalk)
Marianna & John discussing the use of online generators. Easy to use software.
John and Mariana consider a number of questions, including:

  • Do these make us or our students lazy? (I could do this from scratch but I can’t be bothered)
  • Do we end up with generator-envy? ( I will never be able to produce something as good as it does)
  • Do they offer a way into digital literacy that might encourage novices to learn more sophisticated tool?
  • Should we be using generators in class, if they have the potential to discourage learning?
  • Is some friction in tool use better for learning than ease?
Listened No such thing (as writer's block) by Seth Godin from Akimbo
We merely have to write, we merely have to create, have to be generous enough to show up with the best work we have right now. Once the immigular, the resistance realises that you are going to ship it anyway, it will get its act together and your work will get better. Don't say you don't have enough good ideas, say you don't have enough bad ideas.
Listened I see you by Seth Godin from Akimbo #003
Isn’t this what we truly want? To be seen, to be heard, to be understood…
This episode is about going beyond the industrial system to see people in all their jagged individuality. The phrase “I see you” is derived from the Zulu phrase, which talks about seeing someone for who they are, including their history and concerns. Where this is important the most is at school. The episode touches on many of the points covered by Todd Rose in The End of Average.
Listened Disrupting the Disruptors from Radio National
Has our contemporary embrace of disruption become a problem rather than a solution?
Antony Funnell speaks with a number of guests, including Mark Pesce – Honorary Associate, Ian Verrender and Professor Gregory Whitwell, about the idea of disruption today. However, the most interesting conversation is with Professor Andrew King. He has done considerable work testing Clayton Christensen’s theory and highlights some of the limitations to it. This includes Christensen’s approach to ongoing research and modelling, where he collects data, theorises and then tests with new data, adjusting his initial theory. You can read more on King’s work here.