Bookmarked 003: Land of 1000 SPLOTs (Reclaim Today)

In this episode of Reclaim Today we are joined by Alan Levine (better know as Cogdog online) to talk all things SPLOT (the simplest possible learning open tool thingy). But forget the acronym and focus on the opportunity because Reclaim is working closely with Alan and wants to work with others to build out a library of tools for educators and technologists working in and on the web.

Listened 001: Hello World! from Reclaim Today

In this inaugural episode of Reclaim Today we go full meta and discuss why we’re starting this and what we hope to get out of it.

Enjoyed listening to the first episode, even if there is shame associated with podcasts. Even worse, I came upon it via Tim Owens’ post and used Huffduffer to capture it.
Liked ‘We believed we could remake ourselves any way we liked’: how the 1990s shaped #MeToo – podcast by an author (the Guardian)

While promising liberation and endless possibility, the culture of the decade drove us relentlessly in pursuit of perfection

Eve Fairbanks’ reflection on the creation of the MeToo movement reminds me of Molly Ringwald’s look back at the art of John Hughes.

Read the text version here.

Bookmarked Doctor, I think I have GDPR fatigue: Chips with Everything podcast by an author (the Guardian)

The General Data Protection Regulation is coming into force.

These tougher rules on data protection were approved by the EU Parliament in April 2016, but a lot of us didn’t hear about them back then. Perhaps you first heard GDPR mentioned in discussions about recent controversies to do with the questionable use of people’s data.

Or maybe it was when you started receiving a deluge emails.

But what is GDPR, and why should we care about it? And could these new regulations impact our health? What happens with our medical data now?

To help answer these questions, Jordan Erica Webber is joined by the Guardian’s technology reporter, Alex Hern, and Dr Rachel Birch of the Medical Protection Society.

This episode of the Chips with Everything podcast provides a useful starting point for all things GDPR, especially in regards to the health sector.
Listened Revisionist History Season 3 Episode 2 from Revisionist History

Sometimes proof is just another word for letting people suffer.

Malcolm Gladwell wonders how much ‘proof’ we need in order to do something about CTE, a neurodegenerative disease found in people who have had multiple head injuries. The focus was on Owen Thomas and his suicide in 2010. In regards to the question of breaking point, there was no reference of Aaron Hernandez, whose case involves murder and suicide. I wonder how long until this becomes a case in AFL?
Listened EPISODE 12: Freelancers and Professionals from EPISODE 12: Freelancers and Professionals

The ideas covered in this episode:

  • Get a better boss
  • Entrepreneur ≠ Freelancer

  • Improve your tools and your skills

  • Find an industry that wants you

  • Becoming a category of one

  • Focus on the smallest viable audience

  • The confidence to say ‘yes’ and the strength to say ‘no’

  • The challenge of free

  • The discipline of prospecting

  • Get better clients

This is a thought-provoking episode, which raises many questions.

Listened Golden State Killer: the end of DNA privacy? Chips with Everything podcast by an author from the Guardian

US investigators recently tracked down the suspect of a 40-year-old murder case after uploading DNA to a genealogy website. Jordan Erica Webber weighs up the pros of finding ancestors with the cons of selling privacy

Jordan Erica Webber talks to Prof Charles Tumosa of the University of Baltimore, Prof Denise Syndercombe-Court of King’s College and Lee Rainie of the Pew Research Center. This is a challenging conversation and comes back to notions of ‘informed consent’.

Maggie Koerth-Baker discusses changes in data arguing that we need to stop seeing privacy as a ‘personal’ thing:

Experts say these examples show that we need to think about online privacy less as a personal issue and more as a systemic one. Our digital commons is set up to encourage companies and governments to violate your privacy. If you live in a swamp and an alligator attacks you, do you blame yourself for being a slow swimmer? Or do you blame the swamp for forcing you to hang out with alligators?

Bookmarked The Lost Art of Teaching with Gary Stager (Modern Learners)

Is instruction really necessary in schools? Just like that question, today’s conversation will make you think–maybe like you’ve never thought before. We are digging deep into the craft of teaching and what it should involve. The conversation includes our friend, mentor, and educational leader, Gary Stager, who rolls out ambitious and daring initiatives with his teacher training institutes.

Gary’s focus is on the nature of teaching. He says that since the mid-80’s, we have removed the art of teaching from teacher training, and now we have a generation of teachers who don’t know how to teach. Because of this, we need to create a productive context for learning and “bridge the gap.” How is this done? We need good projects instead of “reckless instruction.” Gary believes that deep, meaningful learning is often accompanied by obsession. He focuses on answering the question: How can we create experiences and context in classrooms where kids can discover things they don’t know they love? This is done by implementing good projects that spur creativity, ownership, and relevance.

As always, Gary Stager challenges many assumptions about learning, education and schools. Having been toone of his sessions, there is a certain magic in Stager’s deft provocation at the point of need. What he demonstrates is the importance of understanding the curriculum in order to celebrate the spread of learning, rather than using the curriculum as a guide.
Listened With nature against climate change from Radio National

Nature Based Solutions is an environmental approach that seeks to counter the negative effects of climate change by working with nature.

Often the talk about climate control is about reducing emissions. This episode of RN Future Tense captures a number of environmental approaches designed to respond to changes, such as rising water levels. It is a good example of divergent thinking.
Listened Caliphate from nytimes.com

A new audio series following Rukmini Callimachi as she reports on the Islamic State and the fall of Mosul. Times subscribers get early access to each episode. This series includes disturbing language and scenes of graphic violence.

A series investigating the promiseS of ISIS and those who volunteer to fight in places like Syria. What is amazing is the place of social media within all of this.
Listened Gonski 2.0 – what would these changes mean? from ABC Radio

The Review to Achieve Educational Excellence in Australian Schools discusses a model that gives children personalised teaching based on their ability and achievements, rather than grouping children together according to their age.

On Focus, Nadia sets out to find out exactly what personalised learning is, how it works and what its benefits – or shortcomings – might be.

She speaks to Professor Geoff Masters, CEO of the Australian Council for Educational Research, who outlines the shortcomings in our current system and the alarming decline in the performance of 15-year-olds compared to students in other countries.

Dr Glenn Savage, senior lecturer in Public Policy and Sociology of Education at the University of Western Australia agrees that while there is a definite decline in the achievement of Australian students compared to their international peers, he is more sceptical about the recommendations made in Gonski 2.0.

He says there are better things to be spending our education dollars on than another big overhaul of the Australian education system.

He also believes several changes over the past few years have not helped stem the decline and we still have not tackled the issues of inequitable access to education funding that were identified by the first Gonski report.

Glenn Savage and Geoff Masters talk with Nadia Mitsopoulos about the new Review to Achieve Educational Excellence in Australian Schools. Some of the points discussed include:

  • Does the new report addresses the question of inequality?
  • Is ‘personalised teaching’ worth the money and investment?
  • Is the educational sector exhausted by continual reform agendas?
  • Do the recommendations really address what is happening in the classroom?

Glenn Savage also summarised his thoughts in a post on The Conversation. While Geoff Masters (and Ray Adams) published a post in the ACER Newsletter addressing the question of ‘inequality’ arguing that recent findings have found that equity and fairness are often more important.

In an ‘equitable’ school system, students’ special needs and unequal socioeconomic backgrounds are recognised and resources (for example, teaching expertise) are distributed unequally in an attempt to redress disadvantage due to personal and social circumstances. Here again, ‘equity’ is achieved by prioritising fairness over equality.source

Listened Radical Sacrifice: Terry Eagleton and Daniel Soar | Events from London Review Bookshop

Professor Terry Eagleton’s more than 40 books have explored, in consistently invigorating ways, the many and surprising intersections and confluences of literature, culture, ideology and belief. His latest book *[Radical Sacrifice][2]* (Yale) draws on the Bible, the *Aeneid*, Hegel, Marx, Heidegger and Henry James in a brilliant meditation on the concept of sacrifice, fundamentally reconfiguring it as a radical force within modern life and thought. Professor Eagleton was in conversation about his latest work with Daniel Soar, senior editor at the London Review of Books.


Terry Eagleton talks about all things relating to sacrifice. It is an enthralling conversation that goes in many directions. One interesting idea that he discusses is Marx as prophet:

Insert

Eagleton explains that Marx’s work was not about creating a Utopia, but rather about fixing the present, for the future is created with the language of today. This reminds me of Audrey Watters’ talk The Best Way to Predict the Future is to Issue a Press Release:

I am not a futurist. I don’t make predictions. But I can look at the past and at the present in order to dissect stories about the future.

Listened An Indieweb Podcast – Episode 1: Leaving Facebook by David ShanskeDavid Shanske from David Shanske

This second episode was originally recorded in March, abruptly ended, and then was not completed until April due scheduling. In it, Chris and I discuss the hot topic of Facebook scandals and where you might go if you decide to leave Facebook. Show Notes
The originating articles that kicked off the F…

Listened Cory Doctorow, Meet the Writers 123 – Radio from Monocle

The British-Canadian journalist and author – co-founder of ‘Boing Boing’, one of the most influential blogs in the world – talks about his vision for our digital world.


Cory Doctorow talks about his education, growing up with mainframes, the consumption of news and engaging with others,

Some interesting quotes:

On Succeeding in Technology

If you really want a good job in tech then you should have the good fortune of being born in 1971 … Anyone who is my age who made a living in technology just got lucky by when they were born.

Paying for the Product

They say if you are not paying for that you are the product, what we see in an era of unregulated monopolism is that people who are paying for it are still the product. You buy an iPhone or an Android Phone and it is loaded with survellieance technology … If you are a farmer and you drive your 1/2 million dollar John Deer tracker around your fields, it is gathering telemtery on your fields … Monsanto takes that data and sells it back to you in seed, while John Deer takes that data and sells it to the futures market.

People Are Free, not the Internet

The internet does not want to be free, people do.

Riding the Highs and Lows

It does not matter how delicious the punch is if there is a turd floating in the punch bowl

via Chris Aldrich

Listened Bookclub – BBC Radio 4 from BBC

Led by James Naughtie, readers talk to acclaimed authors about their best-known novels

Here are a collection of quotes I came across in my Evernote as I was cleaning it out from old BBC Bookclub episodes.

Hilary Mantel

History is not something that is behind us, it is something that we move through

History is never cut or dry, because it happened that way, it doesn’t mean it had to happen that way

We have to think of [fiction] not as an addition to history or an alteration of history, we have to think of it as a parallel record, because fiction deals with that which by its nature never comes along to the historical record. The private life, the private thought, the private word, the unexpressed impulse, the thought repressed, the dream, the inner being, the workings of the psyche

Clive James

The problem with anyone who talks well is that they often talk too much

Eventually I achieved sharing as a moral imperative, but I never learnt it

Paul Auster

A book is made by two people – a writer and a reader

Will Self

You don’t really research fiction, except through life

John Banville

I know there are failures on every page and I am tormented by that. That is why I write another book, so that I can get it right.

Listened New insights about what happened at Pompeii from Radio National

How do you correctly interpret a site that was initially unearthed so long ago? Modern archaeology provides new tools to chip away at the secret.


Matt Smith speaks with Dr Estelle Lazer, Dr Eric Poehler, Dr Gillian Shepherd and Dr Steven Ellis about learning with and from Pompeii. With 250 years of archaeological work, we can now gain new insights about Pompeii by investigating the way in which early archeologists collected evidence. Technology is also providing a new way of preserving the past through the creation of a digital map.