Bookmarked Messing About with Messy Play: Messy Maths and More (Technology Rich Inquiry Based Research)
By messing about and getting messy, teachers learn the value of messy play. They see the potential of open-ended exploration with loose parts indoors and outdoors. Perhaps a belief in the Theory of Messing About will support the reconsideration of “Pinterest Pretty” and “Instagram Beautiful”.
I recently attended a regional meeting which involved a focus on ‘STEM’ involving random objects. It was amazing to watch the creativity with the seemingly scrap materials. This is a hat that my table made with that being our brief:

One of the interesting things that I observed through the activity was the storytelling that naturally came out of the activity.

Replied to My Growing Lego (First) Obsession | Graham Wegner - Open Educator by Graham Wegner (gwegner.edublogs.org)
Don't let anyone tell you that you're just playing with toys when you are involved in FLL. You are developing skills to become the future engineers and future scientists of our nation.
I think that Lego can be powerful in so many ways. I remember my Year Fours furiously constructing worlds and vessels with the basic of blocks. It was fascinating and gave me an insight into a whole other world. I have also seen some students really dive into the NXT world.

My only question about the power and potential of First League is how many students it impacts? Too often such activities are restricted to a lunchtime club. I think that this applies to a number of STEM projects. I have a real issue with Fullen, when he says in A Rich Seam that the answer for ‘personalisation’ is often out of class:

We collected over 2000 cards from local businesses which was good but we only had one disc cutter so it too a long time to cut out the bracelets. Actually making the bracelets took a long time with split rings so we changed to regular rings. We got a lot of orders and spent nearly every lunch time making the orders. We were still making and delivering them on the last day of school! We met with a jewellery store buyer in Birmingham and she is giving us a table at a street event in the summer which is awesome.

Apologies if I have misread (or poorly read) your reflections Graham – and I think what you are doing is awesome – I am just wondering about the rest of the students.