Replied to Have you seen these personalities in open source? by an author (Opensource.com)

An inclusive community is a more creative and effective community. But how can you make sure you’re accommodating the various personalities that call your community “home”?

This is an interesting post Laura. I really like your point about what sort of people and personalities make up different communities.

Learn to recognize your own preferences and understand how your brain works—but also remember that everyone’s neural networks work a bit differently. Then, as a leader, make sure you’re creating space for everyone by championing inclusivity, fairness, open-mindedness, and neurodiversity.

I wonder though what the exact purpose of such tests as the Myer-Briggs actually is? I feel the work Goldman etc is useful as a provocation, but what else?

Bookmarked Personality Tests and the Downfall of Democracy (word.weid.io)

Facebook has been designed to be an information-gathering engine in order to more effectively sell personalized advertising. Its algorithm also attempts to deeply understand your interests in order to “optimize for engagement”: keep you using the site, and therefore viewing those personalized ads, for as long as possible. Its users access Facebook for 50 minutes a day.

In order to gather the most information it can, Facebook has been engineered to be the world’s most efficient peer pressure engine. Users on the platform are constantly being persuaded to stay; those who try and leave report being relentlessly emailed with personalized, emotional content to try and get them to come back.

Werdmuller explains how the use of personality quizzes can be and have been used by Facebook to develop a complex profile. In light of the Facebook breach and concerns around Cambridge Analytica, Werdmuller explains that none of this should surprise anyone. It is how the platform has been designed.

Tantek Çelik explains this in the IndieWeb Chat:

The big reveal (IMO) of the FB/CA disclosures is that nothing you post to FB is actually “private”, in practice it is silently shared with random apps (that you happen to use your FB ID to sign into), which then are sharing it with other orgs via acquisition or just outright selling your data.

Liked PISA for personality testing – the OECD and the psychometric science of social-emotional skills by Ben Williamson (code acts in education)

SSES extends the reach of datafication of education beyond school walls into the surveillance of home contexts and family life, treating them as a ‘home learning environment’ to be assessed on how it enables or impedes students’ development of valuable socio-emotional skills

Ben Williamson provides a (very partial) overview of some of the key features of SSES. However, it does raise a few headline points:

SSES extends international-large scale assessment beyond cognitive skills to the measurement of personality and social-emotional skills

SSES will deliver a direct assessment instrument modelled on psychological personality tests

SSES enacts a psychological five-factor model of personality traits for the assessment of students, adopting a psychometric realist assumption that personality test data capture the whole range of cross-cultural human behaviour and emotions in discrete quantifiable categories

SSES extends the reach of datafication of education beyond school walls into the surveillance of home contexts and family life, treating them as a ‘home learning environment’ to be assessed on how it enables or impedes students’ development of valuable socio-emotional skills

SSES normalizes computer-based assessment in schools, with students required to produce direct survey data while also being measured through indirect assessments provided by teachers, parents and leaders

SSES produces increasingly fine-grained, detailed data on students’ behaviours and activities at school and at home that can be used for targeted intervention based on analyses performed at a distance by an international contractor

SSES involves linking data across different datasets, with direct assessment data, indirect assessments, school admninistrative data, and process metadata generated during assessment as multiple sources for both large-scale macro-analysis and fine-grained micro-analytics–with potential for linking data from other OECD assessments such as PISA

SSES uses digital signals such as response times and keystrokes, captured as process metadata in software log files, as sources for stealth assessment based on assumptions about their correlation with specific social-emotional skills

SSES promotes a therapeutic role for education systems and schools, by identifying ‘success’ factors in SELS provision and encouraging policymakers to develop targeted intervention where such success factors are not evident

SSES treats students’ personalities as malleable, and social-emotional skills as learnable, seeking to produce policy-relevant psychometric knowledge for policymakers to design interventions to target student personalities

SSES exemplifies how policy-relevant knowledge is produced by networks of influential international organizations, connected discursively and organizationally to think tanks, government departments and outsourced contractors

SSES represents a psycho-economic hybridization of psychological and psychometric concepts and personality measurement practices with economic logics relating to the management of labour market behaviours and human resources