Bookmarked What the Times got wrong about kids and phones by Anya Kamenetz (Columbia Journalism Review)

Journalism can hand-wring, divide parents from each other, and cast technology as the heart of darkness. Or it can help shed light on a serious issue that I know lots of families are struggling to get right.

Anya Kamenetz pushes back on the digital ‘addiction’ perpetuated by the New York Times. Firstly, it is hyperbole that no one would give their child small doses of crack cocaine:

The parent who compares digital media to โ€œcrack cocaineโ€ allows his kids to use it regularly, which is probably not what he would do with crack cocaine. (He also uses software to track his children online.)

Also, it is not productive to perpetuate extremes as they are not sustainable. For more on Kamenetz work watch her conversation with Mimi Ito.

Replied to INTERTEXTrEVOLUTION by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (jgregorymcverry.com)
I had to go back to my Nexus 5x when my Pixel 2 broke on a recent trip. When I replaced it (had to take Pixel 2 XL) realized nothing in pixel lined justified the $600 price increase from the Nexus line. Nexus 5X might be the last great phone
I really like Douglas Rushkoff’s point that the best mobile phone is the one you have. I still use my Nexus 6P and am happy with it.
Liked โ€œAnd she turned round to me and saidโ€ฆโ€ (Literacies on Svbtle)
I feel weโ€™re knee-deep in developments happening around the area that can broadly considered โ€˜notification literacyโ€™. Thereโ€™s an element of technical understanding involved here, but on a social level it could be construed as walking the line between hypocrisy and protecting oneโ€™s own interests.
Replied to Episode 21 โ€“ Banning Mobile Phones in School by adamprocter (fragmentum.adamprocter.co.uk)
http://media.blubrry.com/inkubator/p/fragmentum.adamprocter.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/09/frag21.mp3 Podcast: Play in new window | Download Subscribe: Apple Podcasts | Android | RSS | Overcast Why banning mobile phones in a school is not really a positive move as this TES article seems to suggest...
Hey Adam,

It feels like there has been so much written about phones lately. I have been sitting with my thoughts for a while and decided to let them go.

Would love any thoughts. Really feel like I am missing something or maybe it is just complicated.

Aaron

Liked Phone Numbers Were Never Meant as ID. Now Weโ€™re All At Risk (WIRED)
So if you're looking for an alternative to the phone number, start with something more easily replaceable. Hardjono suggests, for example, that smartphones could generate unique identifiers by combing a user's phone number and the IMEI device ID number assigned to every smartphone. That number would be valid for the life of the device, and would naturally change whenever you got a new phone. If you needed to change it for whatever reason, you could do so with relative ease. Under that system, you could continue to give out their phone number without worrying about what else it might affect.
Replied to

After a single decade little more remains in our pockets and purses than the snacks, the breath mints and the lip-balm.

Adam Greenfield ‘Radical Technologies’

Liked [INSIGHT] An Alternative To Banning Mobile Phones in School by Jocelyn Brewer (Cut Through Coaching & Consulting)
By changing the approach, and importantly changing our language around technology we reframe the conversation and the connection with have with young people. If we want them to reach out to trusted adults, seek support and report incidents of cyber hate, bullying or violent extremism then we must take time to build meaningful programs that address the skills required. There is no quick fix. There are no apps or software programs that can take away all the risks and insert these skills into peer groups. We need to invest time and energy to developing authentic programs that address the complex interaction between the online and the offline worlds and our relationships within them. These are human problems, which need considered human solutions.
Liked Is Technology Addictive? (Audrey Watters)
I was supposed to speak to a reporter today about iPhones and addiction, but the interview fell through. I jotted down some of my thoughts in preparation for the call, and I thought Iโ€™d post them here in case itโ€™s a topic I decide to return to and flesh out more in the futureโ€ฆ