Replied to Learning Spaces Aotearoa by Steve Mouldey
Rooms that give no sense of you in the space do not give us a sense of belonging. Classroom/learning space wise think of both a blank class of rows but also new ILE spaces with no display areas for learners to mark their space. In our day to day lives we have all seen work pods or office spaces where people have put pot plant, pictures etc. on their little screen areas behind desktop computer. We do this in our living rooms, man caves etc. How do we enable this in learning spaces?
Thank you for sharing your reflections Steve.

I really liked some of the suggestion, such as developing walls that make us think, making sure that students belong in their spaces and thinking about our spaces from the perspective of different learners.

This is another post to add to the list.
Replied to Episode 109: Surveillance and social conformity (tidepodcast.org)

This week, Doug and Dai discuss conformity, social media, Personal Learning Networks, Edward Snowden, surveillance, Big Tech, digital assistants, teaching History, and more!

You speak about the intelligence of buildings in this episode. You might be interested in Ian Guest’s interview of non-humans. I wonder how it might translate to ‘interview’ spaces?
Bookmarked ‘Lifespan’ or ‘Learnspan’? Designing to mitigate irrelevance - by Joann Cattlin (iletc.com.au)
Brand (1994) refers ‘shearing layers of change’; the components of a building that over time, may or may not alter and/or have the capacity to alter, in response to required changes. The components as he describes are 1), the site (setting and location), 2) structure (foundation and load bearing elements), 3) the skin (exterior surfaces), 4) services (the wiring, plumbing, heating ventilation), 5) the space plan (interior layout of walls, doors, ceilings), and 6), stuff (chairs, desks, appliances etc.)
This is an interesting take on the longevity of learning spaces from Chris Bradbeer.

To avoid obsolescence of educational buildings what is important therefore is not only to consider the ‘lifespan’ of our schools but also we are cognizant of their ‘learnspan’

via Tom Barrett

Replied to Bears, Beats and Better Buildings 🐻🎸🏠  - Issue 99 - Dialogic Learning Weekly (mailchi.mp)
This little gem of an article popped up when I was exploring some music learning spaces research. 15 of the world’s most legendary recording studios. The post outlines a range of iconic recording studios across the globe and their contribution to music culture and history. I am always fascinated by creative spaces and in particular the music making process. The mobile recording studio started by the Rolling Stones was used for the live recording of Bob Marley’s “No Woman, No Cry” - fantastic!
Tom, I really liked the post you linked to about the recording studios. One of the most interesting stories i have read about recording studios involved Rick Ruben recreating the conditions for Johnny Cash to flourish. What stood out was that everyone requires something different. Probably not much of a surprise, just hard sometimes with multiple ‘artists’ in the same space.
Replied to INTERTEXTrEVOLUTION by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (jgregorymcverry.com)
So in my #edu522 we are studying connected learning and aaffinity spaces this week anyone in the #indieweb community want to hop on a quick microcast and let me ask you four questions about learning and leading the community? I need to work on a model for the class.
I am always happy to talk, but am hopeless at locking away times (unless it is for work I guess.) Can answer questions asynchronously if you wish Greg? Must admit that is why I like(d) Voxer.

Open Office Stress

The claim is made that open offices were designed as a part of the third industrial revolution where skilled people could come together and collaborate. Reports since the 70’s have discovered that this is not the case and that such spaces increase stress and reduce productivity.

Another design-based example is open-plan offices. In the push to lower overheads—and under the false assumption that it would encourage better working practices—private rooms were traded for non-divided workspaces. This resulted in environments that increase stress, particularly due to noise. Stress has become the dominant cost to human health at work. A 2016 report found that stress accounted for 37% of all work-related ill-health cases in the UK and 45% of all working days lost due to ill health.Source

In response to Apple’s new open planned architecture, Rima Sabina Aouf summarises some scrutiny:

Open-plan offices have become more common since the 1990s but have come under scrutiny in recent years. A recent Haworth’s white paper said that open-plan offices are “sabotaging” employees’ ability to focus at work, with office workers losing 28 per cent of their productive time due to interruptions and distractions.

Similarly, Gensler’s 2016 UK Workplace Survey found that workers were more likely to innovate if they had access to a range of spaces supporting different working styles – including private, semi-private and open-plan environments.

These discussions remind me of the experience described by Aaron Swartz.

Wired has tried to make the offices look exciting by painting the walls bright pink but the gray office monotony sneaks through all the same. Gray walls, gray desks, gray noise. The first day I showed up here, I simply couldn’t take it. By lunch time I had literally locked myself in a bathroom stall and started crying. I can’t imagine staying sane with someone buzzing in my ear all day, let alone getting any actual work done.

Libby Sandler summarises some recent research into open-planned offices, highlighting that:

In many open-plan offices, the drive for increased interaction and collaboration comes at the expense of the ability to focus and concentrate.

When distraction makes it hard for employees to focus, cognitive and emotional resources are depleted. The result is increasing stress and errors, undermining performance.

When employees can’t concentrate on their work, their desire to interact and collaborate with others is reduced.

In some ways, open spaces kills what it is trying to encourage.