Bookmarked The Glass Bees (bavatuesdays)
BlackBoard will leverage their relative omnipresence to gouge schools everywhere into using their tools because they can, and they’ll sell them up with all the administrative, vending machine, and surveillance cameras one could dream of. This is what we are missing. BlackBoard makes an inferior product and charges a ton for it, but if we reduce the conversation to technology, and not really think hard about technology as an instantiation of capital’s will to power, than anything resembling an EdTech movement towards a vision of liberation and relevance is lost. For within those ideas is not a technology, but a group of people, who argue, disagree, and bicker, but also believe that education is fundamentally about the exchange of ideas and possibilities of thinking the world anew again and again, it is not about a corporate mandate to compete—however inanely or nefariously—for market share and/or power. I don’t believe in technology, I believe in people. And that’s why I don’t think our struggle is over the future of technology, it is over the struggle for the future of our culture that is assailed from all corners by the vultures of capital. Corporations are selling us back our ideas, innovations, and visions for an exorbitant price. I want them all back, and I want them now!
Jim Groom celebrates 10 years of Edupunk as a part of Martin Weller’s 25 years of EdTech. This is the post where it all began.
Replied to Fellowship of the SPLOT (bavatuesdays)
The idea is to try and get a series of these SPLOTs in cPanel dashboards across our shared hosting and institutional servers, not only get give folks access to these tools—although definitely that—but also in hopes people will see what’s possible and make their own SPLOTs that can in turn be shared back for others to use. In this way Reclaim could help provide a hub to distribute these “tiny teaching tools” (to misquote Tom Woodward).
I love Alan’s SPLOTs and the support Reclaim provides. I have used Big Picture to create my own ‘home’ page and supported someone in summarising their work. I think they offer so much potential.

I am wonder what place microformats play with all this? I have enjoyed following Greg McVerry’s effort to incorporate #IndieWeb values into his work with Higher Education. I must admit, with my ‘Sunday drive’ of a blog, I am still finding my way. Was just wondering.

Replied to Bildungs Punk at Re:publica 18 (bavatuesdays)
I am holding off because I have not watched boyd’s version of this talk at SXSWedu a couple of months earlier, and I wanted to given it came up in the Virtually Connecting session later that day.
Having watched boyd’s lecture, I thought that it continued the conversation from Digital Media Lab, last year, rather than SXSW.

That presentation is worth watching (or listening) too as well.

Replied to Blogging by Jim Groom (bavatuesdays)

most folks treat their blog as if it were some kind of glossy headshot of their thinking, whereas the beauty and freedom of blogging was that it was by design a networked tool. Blogging provides a space to develop an online voice, connect with a particular network, and build a sense of identity online in conjunction with others working through a similar process. Scale in many ways became a distraction, one which was magnified to such a degree by the hype around MOOCs in edtech that anything less that 10s of thousands of “users,” “learners,” “participants,” followers,” etc. was tacitly considered somehow less than optimal for effective online learning. It was, and remains, a symptom of the capital-driven ethos of Silicon Valley that places all value on scale and numbers which is rooted in monetization—a reality that has infected edtech and helped to undermine the value and importance of forging an independent voice and intimate connections through what should be an independent media of expression. When scale is the endgame the whole process becomes bogged down in page views, followers, and likes rather than the freedom to explore and experiment with your ideas online. It’s a uniquely web-based version of Hell where the dominant form of communication online is a Medium think piece written by your friendly neighborhood thought leader.

This is a useful reflection on blogging and the distraction of scale Jim. To me, this relates to Bill Ferriter’s point about audience. Lately, I have stopped sharing everything everywhere POSSE style and really returned to writing stuff on my blog.
Replied to Uncanny EdTech (bavatuesdays)
Uncanny Learning
Although the zombie apocalypse did not occur in 2012 (as much as I am aware), many of these futures sadly seemingly are coming into fruition. From net neutrality to Web 2.0, many ‘promises’ have failed. One highlight was the mention of Wordle. The uncanny aspect is that it feels like a conversation that is needed today as much as ten years ago.
Replied to LMS Dogma by Reverend (bavatuesdays)
E.M. Forster’s “The Machine Stops,” Brett Victor’s “The Future of Programming,” and Audrey Watter’s PLATO review. I liked the way the idea of dogma weaved its way through all three pieces, and it resonated with the students as well.
Jim, I love Victor’s presentation on programming, as much for the style as the message (can they be separated?) However, I was left rethinking it in light of Victor’s take on making makerspaces more ‘scientific’ seeing space. It had me thinking how sometimes we can trivially end up picking and choosing between ideas and thinkers. For example, I would love to know Watters’ take on Seeing Spaces.
Liked Sometimes They Come Back by Jim Groom (bavatuesdays)
Documenting my work on this blog has basically defined my career. There is no way I would have remembered this assignment, no less gotten kudos from strangers more than a decade later, if I hadn’t taken the time to blog it. I am increasingly convinced that blogging is a long-term investment in your soul, and this is the most recent dividend.