Bookmarked School improvement: Sowing the seeds of success (Australian Council for Educational Research – ACER)

Work in schools long enough and we all get to know the bitter experience of a good idea poorly executed. So, what makes the difference between good implementati

Tanya Vaughan, Jason Borton and Jonathan Sharples provide a case study of educational change across three years. They provide a number of steps:

  • Taking a long-term approach: Treat implementation as a process, not an event; plan and execute it in stages.
  • Giving it the best chance to succeed: Create a leadership environment and school climate that is conducive to good implementation.
  • Starting with your own context: Define the problem you want to solve and identify appropriate programs or practices to implement.
  • Ensuring a smooth implementation: Create a clear implementation plan, judge the readiness of the school to deliver that plan, then prepare staff and resources.
  • Ensuring a smooth implementation: Create a clear implementation plan, judge the readiness of the school to deliver that plan, then prepare staff and resources.
  • Looking to the future: Plan for sustaining and scaling an intervention from the outset and continuously acknowledge and nurture its use.

This example of science is interesting to consider alongside my discussion of supporting technology.