Liked Restore dead websites that don't exist anymore: Archivarix (tools.robingood.com)
Service fully restores to life dead websites by leveraging the Internet Archive / Wayback Machine available at web.archive.org.Key features:Recreates a working copy of the original websiteDownloadable in .zip fileAuto-elimination of 404 pages, broken images, external links, scripts, etc.Auto-deletion of all banners, counters and other external scripts via AdBlock databaseWebsite optimization in accordance with the recommendations of Google Developers. Tons of more options and features that you can setIntegrated CMS for editing pages of restored websitesFree version: Allows website restore with up to 200 files for free.Additional files will cost 0.5 cents per file or $5 for the first thousand files. Every next thousand files will only cost $0.5.First example: the site contains 385 files, including all pages, images, scripts and style files. From this quantity you can deduct 200 because they will be free of charge. So we have 185 files left and you need to pay only for these. Multiply by the file price $0.005, and it equals to $0.93. The cost of the site recovery is $0.93.Second example: the big site contains 25,520 files. From this quantity you can deduct 200 because they will be free of charge. So we have 25,320 paid files. First thousand will cost $5, and the rest 24,320 costs only $0.5 per thousand, therefore $12.16. Full price for the big site recovery is $17.16.My comment: Unique service can restore old and defunct websites for which you don't even have a backup. The service relies on the Internet Archive to fully reconstruct any website within a specific time period. The cost is negligible. The restored website can be viewed on hosted server with Linux or Apache installed. Highly recommended. Try it out now: https://en.archivarix.com/N.B.: To view the restored website, you need to upload the file set you will receive from Archivarix onto a proper Apache or Linux server. Detailed instructions can be found here:https://en.archivarix.com/tutorial/#list-2 You ma also consider using a tool like https://www.mamp.info/en/ to test/view the restored website on your local computer without having to resort to a full server.
Via Stephen Downes
Replied to Who is going to help build a pro-social web? by dave dave
Please participate. Do it well. Put your values on the internet. Our society is literally being shaped by the internet right now, and will be for the foreseeable future. We are all watching the web we’re building. The web is us. Help build a good one.
I feel like I find myself in both camps Dave. I have been critical of way spaces and devices. However, I still participate, just differently.

I am not sure what the ‘answer’ to the current situation is. I like your hopeful suggestion. For me it is about participating on my own terms, whether this be via webmentions or in a shared space that allows for more ownership, such as a social media space using Edublogs. I am not sure if this is the positive participation you are thinking about. I am mindful that this may not be for everyone, but it at least moves to something other.

Bookmarked There are now four competing visions of the internet. How should they be governed? (World Economic Forum)
As countries begin to think about how to regulate cross-border e-commerce in the future, they have found their work complicated by competing visions of what the internet is, and what it is for.
Kieron O’Hara outlines four (plus one) visions for the internet from the perspective of e-commerce:

  1. Silicon Valley
  2. Beijing’s paternal internet
  3. Brussels’ bourgeois internet
  4. Washington DC’s commercial internet

And a bonus one, Moscow mule model.

It is interesting thinking about this after the EU’s recent decision to sign off the Copyright in the Digital Single Market Directive. Casey Newton proposes that there may come a time when we may need digital passports.

Bookmarked Shouldn’t We All Have Seamless Micropayments By Now? (WIRED)
The web’s founders fully expected some form of digital payment to be integral to its functioning. But nearly three decades later, we're still waiting.
Zeynep Tufekci discusses the problems with current online payment systems. She suggests that micropayments offer a potential for innovation and opportunity.

Marginalia

For all the talk of disruption, today’s internet is still young and hugely underinnovated. While it’s difficult to predict all the details—that’s the point of disruption!—I have little doubt that it’s technically possible to build a digital infrastructure that rewards creativity at many scales and protects our privacy. Bitcoin is not the answer, for a variety of reasons, but a blockchain scheme, along with a mixture of more conventional systems and cryptographic tools, might play a part. Whatever the solution is, we just need a combination of vision, smart regulation, and true innovation to advance it.

Right now, we’re stuck where the automobile industry was when cars were still “horseless carriages,” wagon-wheeled monstrosities with high centers of gravity and buggy seats. We’re still letting an older technology—credit cards, designed for in-­person transactions, with high fees and financial surveillance baked in—determine the shape of a new technological paradigm. As a result, that paradigm has become twisted and monopolized by its biggest players. This is one of the modern internet’s greatest errors; it’s past time that we encounter “402 Payment Required” for real.

Liked 🗣Forgive fast, block even faster (and other rules) (The Discourse)

Below is an early attempt at an “Rules for Online Sanity” list. I’d love to hear what you think I missed.

  • Reward your “enemies” when they agree with you, exhibit good behavior, or come around on an issue. Otherwise they have no incentive to ever meet you halfway.
  • Accept it when people apologize. People should be allowed to work through ideas and opinions online. And that can result in some messy outcomes. Be forgiving.
  • Sometimes people have differing opinions because they considered something you didn’t.
  • Take a second.
  • There's always more to the story. You probably don't know the full context of whatever you're reading or watching.
  • If an online space makes more money the more time you spend on it, use sparingly.
  • Judge people on their actions, not their words. Don’t get outraged over what people said. Get outraged at what they actually do.
  • Try to give people the benefit of the doubt, be charitable in how you read people’s ideas.
  • Don’t treat one bad actor as representative of whatever group or demographic they belong to.
  • Create the kind of communities and ideas you want people to talk about.
  • Sometimes, there are bad actors that don’t play by the rules. They should be shunned, castigated, and banned.
  • You don’t always have the moral high ground. You are not always right.
  • Block and mute quickly. Worry about the bubbles that creates later.
  • There but for the grace of God go you.
via Kottke
Bookmarked What the Internet Is For by an author (Locus Magazine)
The internet is not a revolutionary technology, but it makes revolution more possible than ever before. That’s why it’s so important to defend it, to keep it free and fair and open. A corrupted, surveillant, controlled internet is a place where our lives are torn open by the powerful, logged, and distorted. A free, fair, and open internet is how we fight back.
To me, this touches on Zeynep Tufekci’s work.
Listened Product Hunt Radio | The dark side of the web w/ Anil Dash and Allison Esposito | Episode 134 by an author from Product Hunt Radio

On this episode we're joined by Anil Dash and Allison Esposito. Anil is CEO of Glitch, a friendly community where developers build the app of their dreams. Allison founded Tech Ladies, a community that connects women with the best jobs in tech.
We reminisce about the good ol' days of IRC, Friendster, AIM, and MySpace. A lot has changed since then, yet they continue to exhibit some of the same dynamics and challenges of today's massive social networks. We also talk about the challenges of building a healthy community on the internet in a time when careers and reputations can be destroyed in an instant. Of course, we’ll also cover some of our favorite products that you might not know about.

Ryan Hoover speaks with Anil Dash and Allison Esposito about the web. They discuss some of the history, what their involvement has been and thoughts moving forward. Some of the interesting points discussed were:

  • The Challenge of community verses team
  • Going to where the people are (Facebook) verses creating a new space

Marginalia

There’s something about community that if you’re doing it right, it should feel like a mix of it just happened and it’s natural. – Allison

It turns out the hosting of the video wasn’t the thing, the community is the thing and it has a value. Whether you create an environment that you feel people can express themselves in is a rare and special and delicate thing. — Anil

via Greg McVerry

Replied to A Pedagogy of the Internet by Clint Lalonde (EdTech Factotum)
So, all this is to say, for me, the pedagogical piece that I am most interested in is what the open internet enables, and exploring what it means to participate in a meaningful way on the open, public internet. What are the challenges? What are the benefits? Why do I feel it is important that educators and students participate in these open spaces?
Your discussion here of online pedagogies reminds me of Chapter 2 of Anderson and Dron’s book Teaching Crowds. What it has me thinking is that different spaces are conducive to different pedagogical outcomes. I remember a few years ago asking someone from Google what their pedagogical stance was (I was thinking inquiry vs. instruction back then) and he stated that Google was not about deciding other people’s pedagogy. This may be true in part but if you look at there movement into transformation and subsequently online learning then the technology seems to produce certain outcomes.
Bookmarked ISP Column - June 2018 (potaroo.net)
Huston's analysis steps through the seven layers in the OSI stack, beginning with changes in the physical infrastructure (massive improvements in optical signalling, more and better radio, but we're still using packet-sizes optimized for the 1990s); then the IP layer (we're still using IPv4!); routing (BGP is, remarkably, still a thing -- on fire, all the time); net ops (when oh when will SNMP die?); mobile (all the money is here); end-to-end transport (everything is about to get much better, thanks to BBR); applications (Snowden ushered in a golden age of crypto, CDNs are routing around stupid phone companies, and cybersecurity is a worse dumpster fire than even BGP) and the IoT (facepalm).
This report into the web is intriguing and interesting to compare with James Bridle’s discussion of infrastructure and the impact of global warming on things.

via Boing Boing