Replied to End goal for my 14 Day #IndieWeb WordPress Experiment by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (jgregorymcverry.com)
I am going to try and conclude the end of my fourteen WordPress experiment by forking Alanโ€™s theme and seeing if I can correctly add microformats2 and remove any conflicting microformats classes that maybe lingering in theme, ghosts of efforts past.
I look forward to seeing how you go with adding in Microformats. I am not quite at the point, yet. I would assume that if Dimensions works, that it would then open up the possibility of Alan Levine’s other themes.
Liked Why We Need the #IndieWeb: A Short History by Cathie LeBlanc (Desert of My Real Life)
Members of the IndieWeb community are building tools to try to make moving your web presence off the corporate web easier, giving you more control over your digital identity. I like to think of the IndieWeb as a way of trying to regain the democratic ideals of early Web 2.0. IndieWeb wants us all to have a web presence that we own and control. We can still use tools like Twitter and Facebook to bring us together but we publish our content first on our own web sites and then decide where we want to share them.
Replied to On the mission of the IndieWeb movement by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
What you see is what you get (WYSIWYG) is fine when youโ€™re given all the functionality and control you need or want. Itโ€™s when you have additional needs and desires than the tools allow that WYSIWYG becomes a problem. Social media WYSIWYG platforms like SnapChat, Twitter, Facebook/Instagram, et ...
I have found #IndieWeb has challenged my use of markdown, especially in regards to comments. Unless I put in all the tags and code, the links do not flow through. My qualm with HTML is typing everything from scratch. Lately, I have been writing in Markdown and then pasting it into a convertor. Wondering if you use anything different Chris or Greg to make things easier?
Creativity Tips #9: The IKEA Effect and Meraki
In this creativity tip, Amy Burvall talks about the idea of doing enough to feel that you have played a part in the process. This is called the ‘IKEA Effect’s, after the company that has made its name supporting people in the construction of flatpacked creations.

The IKEA effect is a cognitive bias in which consumers place a disproportionately high value on products they partially created.source

For me, this is what makes the #IndieWeb (and DoOO) special. It provides the tools and techniques to make and manage your own creations on the web, without starting from scratch.

Liked I believe in the IndieWeb. It needs to believe in itself
Webmention, like most every IndieWeb technology, hides its light under a bushel of deep obscurity. I discovered IndieWeb three months ago by happenstance, and since then exactly zero of my fellow web-working professionals with whom Iโ€™ve brought up the subject had heard of it before that moment. On the one hand, I find this truly fascinating: here is a geographically diverse group of deeply caring technologists who have not just invented but, over most of a decade, refined and iterated tools for a truly democratized web. They have developed them to a point where the webโ€™s core standards body has recognized their merit, and โ€” more to the point โ€” where a jaded lifelong web-engineer like me can so much as glance at them and immediately feel amazed by their coiled-spring potential, suddenly hungry to start working with them myself.
Replied to ๐Ÿ‘“ The Web We Need to Give Students | BRIGHT Magazine by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
Read The Web We Need to Give Students by Audrey Watters (BRIGHT Magazine) โ€œGiving students their own digital domain is a radical act. It gives them the ability to work on the Web and with the Web.โ€
I must admit, I hadn’t read that post before. However, I did enjoy her book on the importance of domains though. I think that there are many cross overs between a Domain of One’s Own and the #IndieWeb.
Bookmarked The Indieweb privacy challenge (Webmentions, silo backfeeds, and the GDPR) // Sebastian Greger by   (sebastiangreger.net)
Originally intended to showcase a privacy-centred implementation of emerging social web technologies โ€“ with the aim to present a solution not initially motivated by legal requirements, but as an example of privacy-aware interaction design โ€“ my โ€œsocial backfeedโ€ design process unveiled intricate challenges for Indieweb sites, both for privacy in general and legal compliance in particular.
As someone involved in K-12 education, I always wonder where the #IndieWeb might sit. This analysis of webmentions and privacy from Sebastian Gregor poses so many questions and things to consider. I was particularly intrigued about the questions of dragging in ‘likes and favourites’ which might be used and interpreted in different ways.

From an ethical design perspective, however, I still have a stomach ache thinking of publishing the name and image of unknowing Twitter users on an unrelated website, presenting a โ€œlikeโ€ potentially intended as a bookmark of a short tweet as a โ€œlikeโ€ for a long essay on some blog site they have never visited. Here, too, some kind of transparency/consent mechanism would be required; and while I am sorry to not have a ready solution to offer, the idea of simply warning about a backfeed in a sticky post on top of a timeline is not really something I consider sufficient. Likely, the solution for the silo backfeeds would have to come after a solution for Webmentions in general has been developed.

Just thinking about my own use, I usually use the ‘Like’ post-kind to recognise posts that I find interesting, but do not have anything to add (that would be a bookmark.) This does not mean I ‘like’ the post or agree with everything written. This is where confusion can occur.

I think this is one of those posts that I will come back to as my knowledge of webmentions and the #IndieWeb continues to grow and evolve.

Listened The value of rituals in a digital world from Radio National

Are rituals still needed in a world mediated through digital devices?

Alexandra Samuel made the argument that ‘digital rituals’ are associated with the notions of reflection and community.

I think there’s two pieces. I think there’s the reflection and formulation of intention, what do I want from this experience, what does it mean. You know, a lot of rituals will include some element of solitary reflection as part of that process, and I think that is hugely valuable when it comes to thinking about our digital lives. But then the other piece is really almost the mirror image of that. Yes, there’s a piece of ritual that is about solitary reflection, but then there’s another piece that’s really about community recognition and understanding that you are now taking your place in a community or changing your relationship to the community or the community is now offering you a different form of participation or membership, and that notion, that when you join a community or when you change your relationship to the community, that you need to have some kind of mutual negotiation of what that means, that I think is a big part of what’s missing and it really has to do with giving us a chance to say, you know, hey, your Facebook login or your Instagram account or your new blog are not just about you, you are taking a place in a larger community that has a stake in how you use of this access.

This made me wonder if approaching the web following the #IndieWeb principles is somehow ritualistic. Rather than merely commenting or sharing, I now make the effort post content on my own site and syndicate from there.

My only question is whether this is the way it is simply because the technology is yet to develop and as it currently is, the #IndieWeb involves a little bit more effort and investment? Or will the community nature of it sustain the reflective nature?

Also posted on IndieNews