Listened This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition by Marty McGuire from martymcgui.re
This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition is a weekly audio summary of This Week in the IndieWeb,a digest of activities of the IndieWeb community.
Just as with the Domain of One’s Own, the #IndieWeb is as much a mindset, an approach to a more open and democratic web, as it is about the tools. Marty McGuire’s weekly take on the IndieWeb News is a great way to stay abreast of this evolving space. A regular mix of interviews, events, posts and wiki updates is a great place to capture ideas and be inspired. McGuire also provides captions to support the audio.
Replied Facebook, Medium, And Staying The Course Within Your Own Domain by Kin Lane (kinlane.com)
We all want more traffic, readers, and hopefully revenue around our work. It is always tempting to think the grass is greener on another platform. However, we should never lose sight of the importance of owning, operating, and cultivating our own domain. There will always be new platforms who come along and prey upon our desire for more traffic, and the magical network effects they will bring, but it will NEVER be worth abandoning our own domain. Platforms come and go, pivot, shift courses, and rarely will think of you as more than just a data point. Nobody will ever care as much about your content, data, and audience as you do, and I’m hoping folks are starting to learn their lesson after the whole Facebook bullshit.
Great post Kin. Personally, I have really enjoyed digging into the #IndieWeb and taking my blogging and experience with –domains even further. One of my frustrations with Medium is the lack of webmentions. I can understand why – all about the eyeballs – and I do not agree. Like yourself, there are some random posts I POSSE there, but most of the time stay away.

The other half of the conversation is the functionality provided on Medium. If people want ‘annotations’, they can use things like Hypothes.is, if they want to provide the options to link, they can add fragmentions, while there are many themes that provide similar look and feel. To be honest, I think that Hackeducation.com is one of the cleanest reading experiences.

Although third-party applications make it ‘easy’ to sharecrop, the question is at what cost?

Listened 047: The Web is Neither Good or Bad…nor is it Neutral. It’s an Amplifier with Jeremy Keith from User Defenders Podcast
Jeremy Keith reveals how the web is neither good or bad, nor neutral, but an amplifier. He inspires us to not let the future be just something that happens to us, but rather something we make with the small things we do today. He encourages us to build software ethically with our users’ psychological vulnerabilities in mind. He motivates us to not build on rented land, but to publish using the superpower of our own URLs. He also shows us how looking to the past is just as important as looking to the future.
Here is a breakdown of the episode:

  • Iron Man Photo Story (4:43)
  • On Net Neutrality (13:31)
  • What’s “Adactio”? (20:44)
  • Is the Internet Good or Evil? (24:41)
  • Hippocratic Oath for Software Designers (35:51)
  • Resilient Web Design (49:06)
  • Why do you Love the Web so Much? (54:26)

The best of the web is people sharing what they know

  • The Power and Generosity of the Community (63:05)
  • What Comes Next? (71:34)
  • Listener Question? (73:44)
  • Last Words to the Builders of the Web (74:18)
Bookmarked pfefferle/ZenPress (GitHub)
ZenPress - Pure Zen for WordPress
I recently started exploring David Shanske’s 2016 IndieWeb Theme for Read Write Collect. Before, I had been using Matthias Pfefferle’s Zen Press. I really like Zen for its looks and still may go back or use it for my main site. It has the feel of Medium without being in Medium. My concerns were:

  • There were small quirks with how Syndication Links and Search Results were presented (since changed)
  • I could not master my widgets, particularly the way it repeated some widgets at the bottom of the page, even after I had changed them in Appearance settings.
  • I was unable to get a child theme to work, even with the help of Chris Aldrich. (Zen has five stylesheets.)
  • I could not get the Notes post kind to work with Micro.Blog as I think a default heading was included within the RSS (again fixed since)
Replied Duplicate photos in post when using 'photo' post-kind · Issue #147 · dshanske/indieweb-post-kinds (GitHub)
I have an issue when I use the photo post-kind in a WP post. When including a photo in a post and setting the post-kind to 'Photo' I find the photo is duplicated in the post
@raretrack I have been experiencing the same thing.

It also seems to happen when I add audio too.

I inserted the image as ‘Full’ size. I think that you propobably defaulted to ‘Medium’. I assume that the initial image is ‘Full’ too.

I wonder if there is a way to ‘hide’ the inserted image and then it just shows the media content at the beginning of the post?

Replied Fragmentions for Better Highlighting and Direct References on the Web by Chris Aldrich (Boffosocko)
Fragmention is a portmanteau word made up of fragment and mention (or even Webmention), but in more technical terms, it’s a simple way of creating a URL that not only targets a particular page on the internet, but allows you to target a specific sub-section of that page whether it’s a photo, paragraph, a few words, or even specific HTML elements like
or on such a page. In short, it’s like a permalink to content within a web page instead of just the page itself.
Another fantastic post Chris. I love the notion of mentioning a specific part of the text and find it particular useful to link back to sections from my longer posts or parts of my newsletters.

I find it interesting to consider alongside Hypothesis and wonder what the different use cases are?

I have added the plugin, but found the documentation associated with Kartik Prabhu’s additional code confusing, so left it. Is this what Khurt was referring to?

I look forward to seeing where all this grows?

Aaron

P.S. I thought that Flickr sent webmentions (as it is attached to Bridgy), however I was clearly wrong. Sorry.

Bookmarked The punk rock internet – how DIY ​​rebels ​are working to ​replace the tech giants by John Harris (the Guardian)
Around the world, a handful of visionaries are plotting an alternative ​online ​future​.​ ​Is it really possible to remake the internet in a way that’s egalitarian, decentralised and free of snooping​?​
John Harris speaks with a number of people about alternatives to today’s dependence on super nodes and silos. Aral Balkan and Laura Kalbag talk about their concept of a indienet where users control their data:

Using the blueprint of Heartbeat, they want to create a new kind of internet they call the indienet – in which people control their data, are not tracked and each own an equal space online. This would be a radical alternative to what we have now: giant “supernodes” that have made a few men in northern California unimaginable amounts of money thanks to the ocean of lucrative personal information billions of people hand over in exchange for their services.

While David Irvine discusses the idea of a distributed SAFE network built on blockchain technology:

The acronym SAFE stands for “Safe Access for Everyone”. In this model, rather than being stored on distant servers, people’s data – files, documents, social-media interactions – will be broken into fragments, encrypted and scattered around other people’s computers and smartphones, meaning that hacking and data theft will become impossible. Thanks to a system of self-authentication in which a Safe user’s encrypted information would only be put back together and unlocked on their own devices, there will be no centrally held passwords.

No one will leave data trails, so there will be nothing for big online companies to harvest. The financial lubricant, Irvine says, will be a cryptocurrency called Safecoin: users will pay to store data on the network, and also be rewarded for storing other people’s (encrypted) information on their devices. Software developers, meanwhile, will be rewarded with Safecoin according to the popularity of their apps. There is a community of around 7,000 interested people already working on services that will work on the Safe network, including alternatives to platforms such as Facebook and YouTube.

It is interesting to consider these ideas alongside that of the #IndieWeb community. I think both are aspiring to create a demonstrably better web. It will be interesting to see where all of this goes.

Bookmarked The IndieWeb outside of Facebook is full of opportunities - The Garage by Johannes Ernst (Garage)
Promote your own site, or promote on Facebook? Turns out you can do both, and do even better: have your website join the IndieWeb.
I still think Chris Aldrich’s introduction is the most thorough, however it is good to have some of the concepts explained by different people. For example, I like Johannes Ernst’s explanation of webmentions:

Webmention is a simpler but more powerful version of Pingbacks that you might be familiar with. Webmention enables your site to tell somebody else’s site that you posted something about their content on your own site. Think of it as distributed blog comments on steroids.

H/T Doug Belshaw

Liked Microblogging by Paul Robert Lloyd
Maybe a growing disillusion with social networks and the recent resurgence in blogging will bring with it an interest in these newer IndieWeb standards. I’d love to see more consumer-oriented publishing tools adopt MicroPub and Webmention so that their empowering capabilities become available to all. And it’d be great to see competitors to Micro.blog, each with their take on how to fix the problems we’ve uncovered during our embrace of social media. We have the technology; we just have to use it.