Bookmarked There Are Two Ways to Read - One Is Useless – Zat Rana – Medium by Zat Rana (Medium)
Right, wrong, and the value of reading.
According to Zat Rana, reading is not about being right or wrong, but rather about being open new ideas and lessons.

The only filter worth having is the one that distinguishes between what is relevant and what is not; what matters and what doesn’t.

When you filter by right or wrong, not only are you trying to paint a whole with the smaller component of its parts, but you’re also limiting what you understand. Who is to say that there isn’t a lesson in what is wrong? Or more importantly, who is to say that what you assume to be right or wrong is just a current bias that, one day, you will come to readjust?

Any time I reread a book that has been important to me in the past, I always come back with new lessons. Most books contain more than one idea, and they say different things in different places.source

The challenge is to be open to the opportunity to be moved.

Every word, every sentence, and every paragraph of a good piece of writing has the potential to teach you something. That doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t be selective about what you read or that you can’t give up on something that isn’t speaking to you. What it means is that for something to move you, you have to be ready to be moved.source

Liked Reference lists as sites of diversity? Citations matter. (the édu flâneuse)
Who we cite positions our work in a field. It aligns us with particular epistemologies and ontologies; ways of knowing and of ways of being. It can polarise us from others.
Although a bit different, I have been thinking of this lately in regards to my monthly newsletter. The Semantic Linkbacks plugin provides a tally of all the links referenced (and pinged) within the specific post.

A screenshot of some of my links in one of my posts.

As much as I try and broaden the voices incorporated, I fear that my bias (and ego) my take over. One of these days I should collect this data and analyse it.

Watched

Beautiful things grow out of shit. Nobody ever believes that. Everyone thinks that Beethoven had his string quartets completely in his head—they somehow appeared there and formed in his head—and all he had to do was write them down and they would be manifest to the world. But what I think is so interesting, and would really be a lesson that everybody should learn, is that things come out of nothing. Things evolve out of nothing. You know, the tiniest seed in the right situation turns into the most beautiful forest. And then the most promising seed in the wrong situation turns into nothing. I think this would be important for people to understand, because it gives people confidence in their own lives to know that’s how things work.

If you walk around with the idea that there are some people who are so gifted—they have these wonderful things in their head but and you’re not one of them, you’re just sort of a normal person, you could never do anything like that—then you live a different kind of life. You could have another kind of life where you could say, well, I know that things come from nothing very much, start from unpromising beginnings, and I’m an unpromising beginning, and I could start something.

via Austin Kleon

Listened SEASON 2! Episode 1 Permission and SEO and Blogs by Seth Godin from Akimbo
Seth Godin reflects on the changes to his blog over time. This is related to his recent move to WordPress as a blogging platform. In the process he discusses changes to blogging, particularly related to SEO. He also touches on the importance of being specific, generous and consistent enough when connecting ideas.
Replied to Blogging, small-b, Big B (W. Ian O'Byrne)
Currently, my main blog serves as a space for me to narrate my work, or think out loud. I see it as a machine where I consume, curate, and archive materials on my breadcrumbs site, synthesize each week in my newsletter, and then perhaps pull together the loose threads (as I see them) in posts on my blog…or elsewhere. All of these ideas are half-formed at best. They may go on to other things or spaces. As an example, bookmarks saved in the breadcrumbs often turn into blog posts. A series of blog posts have turned into keynotes or lectures. A collection are currently morphing into a book or two. But, all of these ideas are raw, and serve as pre-prints to work that may live later on, or always exist in their current format. When content turns into an article, publication, or other content outside of my main website, I usually bring it back to my spaces by providing a “Director’s Cut” version of my work that includes the Google Doc of the original draft or other insights.
There are times Ian when I wonder why I post what I do. Then there are moments like this, and also recently with another post, where the comments and interaction have really stretched my thinking.

I also really like your point about little beginnings leading to greater things. I have found that the more deliberate approach of using my blog for more, rather than social media, has led to more connections. Reminds me of Amy Burvall’s point about ‘gathering dust for stars.’

Liked a post by https://colinwalker.blog/Colin%20Walker.png Colin Walkerhttps://colinwalker.blog/Colin%20Walker.png Colin Walker (colinwalker.blog)

Ideas are the seeds we plant; some may fall on stony ground but the lucky few find the fertile soils of curious minds just as our minds become incubators for the seeds of others.

As these ideas grow so we take cuttings and offshoots, replant them and let them develop in new, interesting ways. Sometimes they will seem the same but there will be nuance. They may share language or tread the same ground but there will always be variance, just as different cuttings from the same plant will adapt to conditions in a new environment.

It can sometimes be hard to see the possibility of blogging and the web. For me it is about continually joining the dots and making the connections. As Amy Burvall highlights,

In order to connect dots, one must first have the dots

That is the power of Webmentions. My little callout to say, “Hey, interesting idea(s)”. Sharing is where it starts.