Replied to Analytical moves by Ian Guest (Marginal Notes)
Although these details are not attempting to satisfy the more positivist-leaning criterion of enabling replicability, they should nevertheless make it clear that I conducted a ‘rigorous’ study. Is there enough here to convince you of that? If not, what else would you like to see?
Once we trade in reproducibility I imagine that all we have is a case of ‘good-enough’ analysis? The problem I have is that if we were to approach this question from Fish’s interpretive communities then being convinced is not the challenge? If I am a positivist, will I ever be satisfied?
Replied to
Thanks Ian for the challenge.

Day 1 of 7: 7 black and white photos of your life. No humans, no explanations. Challenge someone new every day. Challenged by @IaninSheffield I now challenge @robert_schuetz.

Day 1 of 7: 7 black and white photos of your life. No humans, no explanations. Challenge someone new every day.
(Re)reading Adam Greenfield’s sociology of the smartphone today and I came upon this quote discussing the impact on our lives:

Work invades our personal time, private leaks into public, the intimate is trivially shared, and the concerns of the wider world seep into what ought to be a space for recuperation and recovery. Above all, horror finds us wherever we are.

Made me think about Pernille Ripp’s trials and tribulations on being a connected educator. It also made me think about the darkside to PD in 140 (or 280) characters.

Replied to Flânographie? by Ian Guest (Marginal Notes)
The mobility of the flanographer traces out pathways of experience. Observation, ongoing sense-making and mapping during the course of these perambulations are manifest in each of the three phases – data collection, analysis and presentation. It’s about following and making interconnections and associations. The flâneur’s sensibility means applying the same strategy consistently across the study.
It feels like flânography and assemblages go together?
Replied to In just one tweet? by Ian Guest (Marginal Notes)
A couple of weeks ago, I settled on the first iteration of my bullet points. Then a couple of days ago, while out running and listening to a podcast, I got closer to my tweet, or better yet, a phrase. It was just a word someone used on the podcast, not even related to my research, but which I felt captured the essence within the bullet points. I’ve found that teachers’ professional learning on Twitter is not a single thing, but many interwoven things brought together, working together. The word I heard on the podcast was ‘hybrid,’ but on getting home from the run, discovered it carried too much baggage, associated as it was with blended learning and more about a mixture of on and offline experiences. Even so, I knew I needed something which conveyed a similar sense of different elements working together; this is after all what assemblage is. After shuffling through a thesaurus or two (said he, neatly sidestepping the plural form), I settled on ‘Compound Learning.’ Although it didn’t feel quite the same as ‘hybrid learning,’ the more I think about it and try to flesh it out, the more right it feels.
I really like the idea of riffing off one word like ‘compound’, reminds me of my yearly focus on ‘one word‘.

Reading through your thoughts I was left wonder about the place of Twitter within it all. I understand that one needs a focus, but it sometimes feels arbitrary when reading through your work. I met you via a podcast, picked up resources via Diigo, read your blog and engaged on Twitter. When I think about this, I am left thinking that if you took Twitter out of the conversation – if such an extraction were possible – that not much would change. Is Twitter then the ‘original’ compound? It feels like the focus is connected learning or learning?

Not sure if that makes any sense? I am sure that I just don’t get it, but I thought I would share none the less.

Doctoral Research Image
Doctoral Research Image
Ian Guest created an image to visualise the ‘flânerie’ on Twitter. In a second version, Ian creates a gif to show the three layers.

“Doctoral Research Image” by IaninSheffield https://flickr.com/photos/ianinsheffield/40631136105 is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA

He also documents his thinking:

One of @meteropologeny’s maps was imported into Inkscape and created as a base layer onto which other layers were added.
Tweets were dropped on top of the district blocks. Fitting them to the size and shape of the buildings was possible, but I felt they began to lose their inherent ‘tweetness,’ so left them as simple rectangles. This meant I needed to mask out the underlying buildings …
Which is where the idea for using the Twitter bird came from, although …
It was important as a flâneur not to lose the sense of cityscape, so the next stage brought that back and introduced the different districts or quartiers as ways to categorise the tweets.
As explained previously, these tweets were arranged into different quartiers …
… with the whole street plan reintroduced so one might imagine a walk around the city whilst encountering the kinds of activity seen when wandering the Twitter timeline.
The street names are formed from blog post titles, each street intersecting the quartiers which the contents of the post exemplify.
In the final stage, for simplicity, the tweets are wiped and replaced by illustrative snippets from the blog posts on adjacent streets.

I particularly like Ian’s take on interpretations associated with the various layers. I remember creating a similar thing with transparencies in a project when I was at university.

Replied to Quite a week (Marginal Notes)
On Friday I did something I’ve never done before. Ever. I bunked off. It was a gloriously unseasonal spring day, I’d just handed in my first draft and I’d won a prize earlier in the week. I felt I deserved a treat, so took advantage of the sun and pedalled off on a longer bike ride than the winter usually permits. Coffee and cake provided an indulgent lunchtime treat as I basked in the sun. OK, so I did catch up on a couple of research-related podcasts during my journey, and by the time Sunday closed, I’d still clocked up a fifty-hour week, but having that weekday off still felt … naughty.
Congratulations Ian for getting your first draft in. I hope your leg is ok now too.
Replied to Why teachers are turning to Twitter by Brendon Hyndman (The Conversation)
Rather than a one-off professional learning event (such as a conference), Twitter provides a low-cost, easy to access platform. It requires little effort beyond 280 character posts or photos to connect with a range of education professionals, leaders and organisations.
I am a massive advocate of open education. I feel the possibility of a wider audience has taken my learning to a new level. Reading this post, I just feel that there is a massive question not considered.

If you interviewed my last year, would I provide the same response as I do now?

My experience of Twitter has waned of late. I still share there. I still engage with people. However, I have moved my learning to my own space. I think that this is important.

As with all technology, Twitter is ever evolving. The most recent news has been the depreciation of their API that allows for the development of external applications. Each of these changes has a consequence.

The other concern I have is which teachers are turning to Twitter? Chris Wejr questions whether every teacher is able to share who they are online?. Maha Bali also captures this in regards to open education:

what kind of privileges do we have that give us the power to have a space there – things like the English language, having the capacity for a good bandwidth on in the internet to do something like virtually connecting, having TIME to spare and being financially comfortable, being naturally willing to expose yourself and make yourself vulnerable – you have to have a lot of privileged to be willing to make yourself vulnerable. Because some people are already vulnerable and marginal and they cannot take certain risks online.

In addition to whether they can share themselves online, the other consideration is whether they must?

I wonder then if the title should be why some teachers are turning to Twitter and what does this say about education? Personally, I wonder whether more teachers will turn to the open web and a better web? Here is to hoping.

Replied to Technology and Learning. Evidence and Impact by Corrie Barclay (Learning and Leading)
It’s not been until my current place of employment that I was asked, repeatedly, by parents and caregivers about what the impact would be of iPad devices being integrated in to their student’s learning. In saying that, it does not mean that other parents and caregivers has not been concerned in ...
Interesting reflections Corrie.

I thought the one person to turn to in regards to the effectiveness of technology was Gary Stager. He certainly has some interesting things to say:

I am intrigued by your reference to Marzano in association with technology. Have you read his work on IWBs?

I have always had concerns with SAMR, my particular gripe is the lack of awareness to the wider context. I have really enjoyed following Ian Guest’s work assocaited with Twitter, in particular his reference to ‘non-human’ actors. This is why I think that there is hope with the Modern Learning Canvas to support teachers in developing a richer appreciation of practice. See for example the canvas I made assocaited with our learning model:


“Modern Learning Canvas – Instructional Model” by mrkrndvs is licensed under CC BY-SA

If we ask teachers to change their “roles, relationships and actions”, I think that we need a way of seeing and appreciating that. The canvas provides a great tool to identify transformation.

Lastly, in regards to wider research, I collected some links here if you need anything.

Aaron

Syndicated on collect.readwriterespond.com

Liked ‘Our’ positionality? by Ian Guest (Marginal Notes)
Bringing a sociomaterial sensibility built on actor-network theory to this study positions me in a particular way. This eschews the notion of a pre-existent reality ‘out-there’ waiting for the knowing subject to discover and explain it. Nor is reality constructed by the distant researcher through a set of discursive practices. Instead, reality is performative, brought into being as a result of the relationships which form and reform when actors, both human and nonhuman, intra-act. As a researcher of and with teachers using Twitter then, I am entangled with a heterogenous mix of educators, software platforms, digital devices, terms of service, time zones, screens, hashtags and notifications. What emerges from the study depends on the knowledge practices which are brought to bear, but these do not solely involve a researcher, research participants and standard qualitative methods, but also an eclectic mix of other nonhuman actors. Together their relational performances constitute ‘methods assemblage’ (Law, 2004), where different realities become enacted depending on the actors which participate. One implication might be that this should not be statement of my positionality, but of ours.