Liked Reply to Ian O’Bryne on annotations by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (BoffoSocko)
Ideally they’d want to have webmentions work in two places. It would be great if they could send webmentions of annotations/highlights to the original page itself, so that the site owner is aware that their content is being marked up or used in this manner.
I am really intrigued by the work going on this space. I think that the addition of webmentions and micropub specifications would be a huge positive.

I really must dig in, as I can see this being a replacement for Diigo, which I have progressively moved away from this year. Although Press Forward might offer some of this functionality too.

Replied to Three examples of annotations, bookmarking, & sharing in my digital commonplace book (W. Ian O'Byrne)
For me, a breakthrough came when I posted a piece about Interviewing my digital domains. Chris Aldrich took the time to use Hypothesis to mark up my post and archive this all here. He then reflected on this use of highlights and marginalia. All of this had me thinking about opportunities to modify my process as detailed up above, to include Hypothesis to mark up and annotate posts, as opposed to just pulling quotes from the piece.
Thanks for sharing this Ian. I prefer Option 3 as it provides more options.
Liked An Outline for Using Hypothesis for Owning your Annotations and Highlights by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (BoffoSocko)

There are certainly variations of ways for attempting to own one’s own annotations using Hypothesis and syndicating them to one’s website (via a PESOS workflow), but I thought I’d outline the quickest version I’m aware of that requires little to no programming or code, but also allows some relatively pretty results. While some of the portions below are WordPress specific, there’s certainly no reason they couldn’t be implemented for other systems.

Replied to 📑 Highlight of “Interviewing my digital domains” by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (BoffoSocko)
Typically a highlight wouldn’t include a textual note (like this), otherwise it would be considered marginalia or a general annotation. Perhaps I’ll get around to adding an annotation type shortly as well.
In regards to post kinds, how is a highlight different from a quote?
Replied to Some thoughts on highlights and marginalia with examples by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
Earlier today I created a read post with some highlights and marginalia related to a post by Ian O’Bryne. In addition to posting it and the data for my own purposes, I’m also did it as a manual test of sorts, particularly since it seemed apropos in reply to Ian’s particular post. I thought I’d take a stab at continuing to refine my work at owning and controlling my own highlights, notes, and annotations on the web. I suspect that being able to better support this will also help to bring more self-publishing and its benefits to the halls of academe.
Thank you so much for writing this post Chris. I was actually going to ask your process and will enjoy reading how you use RSS to curate it. I have always liked the idea of Hypothesis, but felt frustrated by the way that it shows up on my site randomly. I did find an aggregator, but wondered how it could be incorporated within comments like on Medium. This might also be another step for me in leaving Diigo, time will tell.
Liked Annotations are an easy way to Show Your Work (Jon Udell)
Not every source link warrants this treatment. When a citation refers to a specific context in a source, though, it’s really helpful to send the reader directly to that context. It can be time-consuming to follow a set of direct links to see cited passages in context. Why not collapse them into the article from which they are cited? That’s what HypothesisFootnotes does. The scattered contexts defined by a set of Hypothesis direct links are assembled into a package of footnotes within the article. Readers can still visit those contexts, of course, but since time is short and attention is scarce, it’s helpful to collapse them into an included summary.
Liked How to improve Wikipedia citations with Hypothesis direct links (Jon Udell)
Wikipedia aims to be verifiable. Every statement of fact should be supported by a reliable source that the reader can check. Citations in Wikipedia typically refer to online documents accessible at URLs. But with the advent of standard web annotation we can do better. We can add citations to Wikipedia that refer precisely to statements that support Wikipedia articles.
Bookmarked Hypothes.is Aggregator ― A WordPress Plugin (Kris Shaffer)
I've created a WordPress plugin called Hypothes.is Aggregator, which will allow WordPress users ― bloggers, teachers, and students alike ― to collect their own annotations, annotations on a topic of interest, or annotations from/about a class, and present them in a page or post on the WordPress platform. It's easy to install, easy to use, and (I hope) will be of value to students, scholars, teachers, and writers.
This is an interesting approach to collecting comments and contributions from around the web.