In Fiona Hardy’s novel How to Write the Soundtrack to Your Life, the protagonist, Murphy, reflects on the association between songs and feelings.

As more songs played, I kept thinking about that. How songs made people feel different ways, like they were in different seasons. Like they were running, or sitting calmly, or at the beach; or the feeling they had when their dog had gone to the vet and not come back; or when they were at their grandma’s farm and it was night and so dark they could see everything and nothing. And the more they spoke, the more I knew I was desperate to play my keyboard. To make something like these things. To build a feeling.

This had me thinking about the role of music in setting space. For example, the soundtrack to Sons of Anarchy draws on many familar tracks, but interprets them to fit a particular feel. Or David Lynch’s subversive choices, such as the use of Roy Orbison’s In Dreams in Blue Velvet.

To me, Lynch and Orbison both occupy a space in their respective art forms as singular voices. Each seem to traverse or explore more dream-like or subconscious terrain and each bring back a vision that is unique, that is, perhaps, candy colored.

Another way of looking at the creation of space, is the search for a space long lost. This is what Daniel Leviton unpacks in regards to the association between music and the memory of a particular time in life,

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Finally got a copy Fiona and Ms. 9 told me that you know if you are going to be interested in a book in 7 seconds. I was kind of worried, but she said it was the next book on the list to read. Just gotta finish The Magic Wishing Chair first 🙂
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Can I ask a dumb question, who took this photo, knowing that smartphones did not yet exist in Year 11? I do not remember people walking around corridors taking photos.
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Congratulations Fiona
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Congratulations Fiona. Look forward to reading it.
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Even if I did play Body Movin’ for my kid brother when he was young https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uvRBUw_Ls2o As a parent, I am agreeing with @JulieAnneGrasso. Unless there is something about the particular song that is an imperative, I would say no 🙁
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Fiona, not exactly sure what you are after or what constitutes a ‘blog’ these days, but I’d recommend reading @Kate_ohalloran writing on the matter https://www.abc.net.au/news/kate-ohalloran/10821058 she also has a podcast @KickLikeAGirlFM
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Huge congratulations Fiona.
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This is such an important message Fiona. It reminds me of Austin Kleon’s message from Steal Like an Artist:

What a good artist understands is that nothing comes from nowhere. All creative work builds on what came before. Nothing is completely original.

We however forget about stealing from our past selves.

This is what I like about Song Exploder, where artists break down the birth of an idea.

Replied to Required watching: Fiona Hardy’s favourite childhood films by Em, Author at Affirm Press (Affirm Press)

Fiona Hardy’s brilliant debut novel How to Make a Movie in 12 Days is, in part, an homage to her long-held love of all things film. (If you couldn’t tell by the title, just check out the 20-page school holidays movie guide at the back of the book.) Here, Fiona shares five films that kick-started her movie madness.

Fiona, I forgot about the ‘Hire ten for $xxx’ deal while growing up. It was always so serendipitous. There would be those few films that had just transferred from Overnight to Weekly that you wanted to rent, but then you would be left grabbing all sorts of random flicks to get up to the given total.

On a side note, you might be interested in Reclaim Video and the effort to reclaim lost memories and technology.