Listened Facial recognition login for porn? from Radio National

The Department of Home Affairs has suggested using face scans to confirm people’s age before they watch online pornography and access restricted gambling sites.

The launch of digital drivers licences in NSW, Google in court and Twitter just decided to do something that Facebook have refused to do.

Guests: Ariel Bogle, online technology reporter ABC RN science @arielbogle and Matt Hopkins, Pedestrian Daily @mopkins88

As the proposal for a porn block worked so well for the UK, it would seem that Australia is considering going down the same path. The most interesting comment was that as the government did so well with the census, what could possibly go wrong with facial recognition?
Liked filter success

If we are to rely less on machines and more on fellow humans we will have to put more effort into our knowledge filtering. Inside large companies, human filters can be identified, promoted, and supported. The identification of knowledgeable people should be an important management function. The organization can also help people to codify some of their knowledge, especially through stories. I have noted before that stories connect knowledge. Stories can provide the contextual glue, holding information together in some semblance of order for our brains to process into knowledge. Stories also help to develop empathy and in the longer term, trust. Knowledge in trusted networks flows faster.

Liked Internet Content Filter History: Filtering Out the Bad Stuff (Tedium: The Dull Side of the Internet.)

Today in Tedium: If there’s one thing I’ve learned in my years as a writer, it’s that when someone doesn’t like something enough to email about it, they start their message out with “I read with great interest …” before diving into their gripe. With that in mind, I read with great interest Tumblr’s announcement about censoring adult content on its platform, which saddened me as a longtime Tumblr user—not because I was looking for that content, but because a creative outlet I once greatly appreciated was losing much of its freedom. The filter is terrible, of course, and its terribleness reminded me of the bad old days of early web filtering, when the internet was new and its capabilities poorly understood. And as the conversation about the European Union’s Article 11 and Article 13—the latter of which would effectively require pervasive filters for copyright on many platforms—now’s a good time to look into that history. I love you, Tumblr, but today’s Tedium is talking filters. — Ernie @ Tedium