Bookmarked A New Approach for Listening by an author
I am not into frameworks so these are just suggestions for an approach to listening. It may not be rocket science but these are my thoughts鈥t starts with recognizing that our listening is limited by what we hear (how widely we are exposed to diverse ideas and how deeply we interact with them) and also how we hear (how open we are, how aware of our own biases and where others are coming from) and how we notice what we don鈥檛 hear (silence, between lines).
Maha Bali reflects on the different approaches to listening, including widely, deeply, openly, repeatedly, outside, inside, to silence, between the lines and to take action. On the flip side, Bali warns about lip service listening.
Liked WALL路E by an author (Typeset in the Future)
From a trash-filled Earth to the futuristic Axiom and back again, WALL路E is a finely crafted balance between consumerist dystopia and sixties space-race optimism. Please join me, then, for a detailed dive into the uniquely robotic future of a remarkably human film, as seen through the eyes of its eponymous hero, WALL路E.
Liked The Avid Reader: Helen Schulman on As I Lay Dying (Literary Hub)
More astonishing to me was that in mining his characters鈥 thoughts and private struggles, Faulkner used elevated maximalist language, the poetic and truest manifestation of these poor country people鈥檚 psyches and souls鈥攁nd not the inarticulate staccato utterances that we hear realistically employed in active dialogue in scenes. This lashing together of characters and readers, through the tongues of the angels, is I think the most brilliant of all his moves. I felt as if knew each one to the marrow, their secrets and their sorrows, and most intriguingly to me their selfish inner motivations, the motors that made them run.
Bookmarked What the earliest fragments of English reveal (bbc.com)
The earliest fragments of English reveal how interconnected Europe has been for centuries, finds Cameron Laux. He traces a history of the language through 10 objects and manuscripts.
This collection of historical artefacts is insightful both from the perspective of language, as well as the origins associated with each. It seems that every piece involves some element of luck as to how it survived that it makes you wonder the texts that have been lost over time and how this may impact our appreciation of the past.
Bookmarked If you want to be a writer, you have to be a reader first by an author
It鈥檚 been said a million times 鈥 it鈥檚 one of the main points of my books Steal Like An Artist and Show Your Work! 鈥 and yet, it still seems to be controversial or confusing to young people who are starting out: If you want to be a writer, you have to be a reader first.
Austin Kleon provides a collection of quotes outlining the importance of reading before writing. It is interesting to think about this in regards to J. Hillis Miller’s argument that reading itself is an act of writing:

As we read we compose, without thinking about it, a kind of running commentary or marginal jotting that adds more words to the words on the page. There is always already writing as the accompaniment to reading.

Liked On Reading (Julian Stodd's Learning Blog)
Reading is the process of gently breaking yourself: eroding dogma, undermining聽opinion, fracturing certainty. It鈥檚 a continual process of renewal: evaluating the things that we are sure are true, against new evidence that our certainty maybe unfounded, leaving us with the choice of growth, or stagnation. It鈥檚 an aggregated activity: we may not read one page that changes us, but the pages, in aggregate,聽change聽us immeasurably. If we are open to the opportunity.
Liked Opinion | The Writer Who Destroyed an Empire (nytimes.com)
All this would give the writer great satisfaction. But though feted and exploited by questionable allies, Solzhenitsyn should be remembered for his role as a truth-teller. He risked his all to drive a stake through the heart of Soviet communism and did more than any other single human being to undermine its credibility and bring the Soviet state to its knees.
Bookmarked Revisiting the Genius of Middlemarch by an author (Literary Hub)
Some great novelists, like Jane Austen, mostly absent themselves from their narratives. George Eliot is present everywhere in Middlemarch, often speaking in the first person. We are in the company of someone humorously wise. It is risky for a novelist to explain her characters鈥 behavior by making observations from life, but she does so with a subtlety that animates those characters rather than turning them into demonstrations.
I remember Middlemarch as being a novel of small things. I really should reread it as it has been a few years.
Liked A process for analytical writing鈥 by an author

Bianca鈥檚 (uncomplicated) textual analysis process:

  1. Read the text carefully and highlight the bits that I think are really interesting and evocative (make me imagine people, places, situations or think about big ideas).
  2. Under each human experience rubric heading (see table given in class) write one or two things that I found in the text. These become sub-headings under the main rubric headings.
  3. I then number each thing I鈥檝e found (e.g. 鈥1. Striving for authenticity鈥) and then go through my highlighted bits in the text and put the relevant number beside it. (i.e. the quote(s) I highlighted that best evidences 鈥榮triving for authenticity鈥).
  4. I type up the quotes under the headings/sub-headings in a new document. For each quote I try to identify what device is being used by the composer to communicate the idea and add this beside it. This isn鈥檛 always something you can put your finger on in the example, like a metaphor or simile, but could be something broader like characterisation, structure, perspective or narrative voice that the example shows.
  5. For each piece of evidence, I think about why the identified device is effective at making the reader think about the identified idea in the subheading, and why the composer would want me to think about that idea, or feel a particular emotion, or imagine a particular situation etc. This is about the purpose and the effect of the device used to create meaning.
  6. Once I have all of this information, I start to write. Usually I write in IDEA sentences (it is natural for me now and allows me to say more in less words) but not always, so don鈥檛 confine yourself to a formula.