Bookmarked Wild About Books by Kim Yeomans (wildaboutbooks.global2.vic.edu.au)
The Wild about books blog is a place for me to continue to share books I have enjoyed reading as well as letting you know about author or bookish events that make reading even more fun.
Kim Yeomans has started a new blog to share books for young readers. Along with Bianca Hewes’ Instagram account @Jimmy_Reads_Books and Pernille Ripp’s collections, these sites are useful resources when looking for new titles.
Liked One More Time for the People in the Back by Pernille Ripp (pernillesripp.com)
We need to speak books. To share books. To have books that show them who they are and also what others are. To celebrate books and all types of reading so that within our classrooms and schools every child can see themselves as a kid who reads. As a kid whose reading matters.ย  As a kid who doesnโ€™t read โ€œeasyโ€ books, who doesnโ€™t cheat in reading when they listen to audio books.ย  As a kid who might not just be a reader someday, completely dismissing that they are, indeed, already a reader. And not just in their own eyes but in our eyes as well. So I suppose I can say it one more time; what we do with the reading we do matters. What we donโ€™t do with the reading we do matters. The identities we help create matter. And the words our students share about what is killing their love of reading matters.ย  the least we can do is listen to them. And we must bring back common sense reading practices to protect the very kids whose reading lives we were told to nurture, to protect, and to grow.
Liked Text tradeoffs as we move from print to pixel by wiobyrne (W. Ian O'Byrne)
A broadened view of text is needed to consider the various forms and modes of text in our world. These might include text in a printed book, a street sign, a video game, a YouTube video, an animated GIF, audio podcast, etc. We can no longer look at only one form of text as โ€œcorrectโ€, and all other forms of reading and writing as not involving true literacy practices.
Bookmarked How to Write an Edu-book (The Confident Teacher)
I wanted to share my own edu-bookery. It is important to state that for me, regular blogging and writing separate to a book is an excellent mental work-bench for writing a book, offering me the discipline needed to write habitually and at length. Still, my book writing process is really quite specific and I have fell upon a helpful habit in writing my latest book.
Alex Quigley discusses his six steps to writing a book:

  1. Coin an idea and chapter structure
  2. Delve into the research
  3. Review the notes
  4. Transfer notes to seperate word files
  5. Write the book
  6. Draft and edit

In addition to the reflections from Mary Myatt, Tom Sherrington and Ryan Holiday, they offer a useful insight into the writing process. It is interesting to compare these with the process often taught in schools. So often students get straight into writing without giving time to the initial planning process.

Bookmarked Some Small Ideas to Help Students Self-Select Books Better by Pernille Ripp (pernillesripp.com)
I was asked this morning on Twitter how we move students beyond wanting hand-picked recommendations every time they book shop. How do they move beyond needing someone, typically, the adult or trusted reading role model to help them find the next book to read?
Pernille Ripp lists the things that she does to move students from hand-picked books:

  • We build our libraries, both whole school and classroom libraries.
  • We carefully craft our book displays.
  • We have a to-be-read list.
  • We book talk books almost every day.
  • We do lessons on how to book shop.
  • We just say no.
  • We dive into their reading identity.
  • We read every single day in class.

This continues on from an earlier post discussing reading programs