Bookmarked Opinion | No, You Can’t Ignore Email. It’s Rude. by an author (nytimes.com)
Being overwhelmed is no excuse. It’s hard to be good at your job if you’re bad at responding to people.
Adam Grant explains that email today is what taking calls was in the 90’s. He explains that simply ignoring them is not a solution. Instead we need to have clearer processes in place, whether it be alternative means of contact or writing short replies explaining this.

Remember that a short reply is kinder and more professional than none at all. If you have too much on your plate, come clean: “I don’t have the bandwidth to add this.” If it’s not your expertise, just say so: “Sorry, this isn’t in my wheelhouse.” And if you want to say no, just say “no.”

The one caveat, emails from strangers continually asking for something. These can be ignored.

I have a few general rules. You should not feel obliged to respond to strangers asking you to share their content on social media, introduce them to your more famous colleagues, spend hours advising them on something they’ve created or “jump on a call this afternoon.” If someone you barely know emails you a dozen times a month and is always asking you to do something for him, you can ignore those emails guilt-free.

Bookmarked Why we hate using email but love sending texts (bbc.com)
They both allow us to stay in touch, but while email often attracts ire, text messaging is more popular than ever. Is the way we choose to communicate saying more than we might think?
Bryan Lufkin reflects on the changes associated with our use of email overtime. Whereas it was restricted to a few users, now everyone (and every company) has your address now. The argument made is that people are now more willing to text or ‘snap’. I wonder if this is due to the lack of novelty provided by other spaces? This article provides a different perspective than Quinn Norton’s history of the technology.
Listened 004: Tech Talk Thursdays from Reclaim Today

Your weekly Q&A session where we debunk the hosting myths, show you how the donuts get made, and answer all your burning questions about web hosting or anything else you have on your mind.

Tim Owens breaks down all the different facets of email. He discusses spam, servers, iMap vs Pop and various setup considerations.
Replied to no more email subscriptions (jarche.com)
There are several ways to subscribe to this blog and I have just removed two: Feedburner (Google), and Webfish. This will be the last post you receive via email as I am cancelling subscriptions and deleting all subscribers in the next 24 hours. Why am I doing this? 1. I do not agree with Google’s...
Harold, you have me thinking about my use of email. I think that I will maintain my email related to my newsletter. However, I am wondering about my blog(s).

Another option you didn’t include in following blogs via email is IFTTT.

Bookmarked Email Is Dangerous (The Atlantic)
Email has changed since then, but not much. Most of what’s changed in the last 45 years is email clients—the software we use to access email. They’ve clumsily bolted on new functionality onto the old email, without fixing any of the underlying protocols to support that functionality.
In my work with schools there is a lot of conversations that seem to end with “just email [insert content] to them”. Although this is convenient, it is not always the best practice. In this post from Quinn Norton in The Atlantic she shares why. Continuing to remind us how everything is broken, Norton gives a history of email and many of its inherent flaws. This comes on the back of the latest discovery of bugs associated with supposed encrypted email.