Replied to Podcast #39 – Using Adaptive Change Methods to Revolutionize Education (Modern Learners)
Do you know the difference between technical change and adaptive change? Most change in schools involves technical change, like “dressing up” the current situation, but not really addressing the underlying issues. Adaptive change, as defined by Harvard’s Ron Heifetz, is changing culture, worldview, and self-worth. These are the changes that are the hardest to make and require a re-imagination of our culture and our basic roles. The message is that we need to stop “playing around the edges” and make changes that really get to the core.


Another interesting listen, with so much to reflect upon.

One thing that stood out though was Will Richardson’s reference to “a post shared on LinkedIn and Facebook.” I wonder if this is the ‘Modern’ world, one ruled by platform capitalism? If:

We need to stop “playing around the edges” and make changes that really get to the core

then I wonder if this is really the core?

I understand our focus should be about ‘learning’, but if there is anything to come out of the recent Cambridge Analytica revelations, then it is surely that we need a better model moving forward.

The future may not involve everyone to #DeleteFacebook, but I would hope that those leading technological change would lead the way? I have the same concern about Anil Dash writing about the open web in a post on Medium. For me, the future is the IndieWeb, for others it is a Domain of One’s Own. I think that both of these discussions touch upon the idea of a canonical URL.

Replied to Assessment in the digital world….with a pencil by Gill (a macgirl in a pc world)
My current setup for my reading conference notes looks like this – a summary page at the start with hyperlinks to individual pages for each of the student records. The different colours on dates are for the fact that I share my grade with another teacher so this solution allows us both to take notes and know where the other teacher is up to.
When Reading Conferences rolled out across the WMR a few years ago, I pushed for doing conferences online. Initially this was via Google Docs and then Word documents on Dropbox.

In a Secondary environment, this allowed access to multiple stakeholders, both teachers and students. In hindsight, it did not work. Not only did students feel that reading was done to them, but it was also left to the English teachers. I reflected about it here.

When I moved down to Primary, I discovered the limits of capturing things like running records digitally. I can really see the possibilities of the pen in supporting this.

How do you see this continuing to evolve? Are students actively involved?

Bookmarked Tools come and go. Learning should not. And what’s a “free” edtech tool, anyway? by Lyn (lynhilt.com)
Do I need this tool? Why? How does it really support learning? What are the costs, both monetary and otherwise, of using this service? Do the rewards of use outweigh the risks? Is there a paid service I could explore that will meet my needs and better protect the privacy of my information and my students’ information? How can I inform parents/community members about our use of this tool and what mechanisms are in place for parents to opt their children out of using it? When this tool and/or its plan changes, how will we adjust? What will our plans be to make seamless transitions to other tools or strategies when the inevitable happens?
Lyn Hilt reflects on Padlet’s recent pivot to a paid subscription. She argues that if we stop and reflect on what we are doing in the classroom, there are often other options. Hilt also uses this as an opportunity to remind us what ‘free’ actually means, and it is not free as in beer. We therefore need to address some of the ethical questions around data and privacy. A point highlighted by the revelations of the ever increasing Cambridge Analytica breach.
Bookmarked The webinar must die: a friendly proposal by Bryan Alexander (Bryan Alexander)
Type I webinars are a mistake in 2018, and they need to die. We can leave them behind and take our presentations and conversations to other platforms, either Type II or by flipping the webinar. Or we can re-invent, re-use, and reboot Type I. In a time where discussions are more fraught and also more needed, we should do this now.
Bryan Alexander reflects on webinars comparing the lecture style with the more interactive videoconference. He argues the lecture style must go and is better presented as an asynchronous experience on a platform like YouTube, allowing for engagement through the comments. Another possibility is to flip the lecture presentation therefore allowing the webinar to be a discussion of the various points.
Replied to Virtually the same? by Matthew Esterman (Medium)
What kind of learning experience can ‘other’ realities provide that our physical realities don’t? What effects will (dramatically) reduced cost and much more prolific access to VR equipment mean for schools? What professional learning will be required for teachers, parents and students to fully utilise these kinds of technologies? How do we ensure that we don’t just create a new method of information consumption but critical thinking, collaboration and creativity?
I have written about VR before, from the perspective of Google Cardboard. Some ideas that I thought of were as a means of supporting vocabulary, real life learning, telling stories and sparking curiosity. It is an interesting space.
Listened The EduProtocol Field Guide: By Jon Corippo and Marlena Hebern from The TeacherCast Educational Network
In this episode of “Ask the Tech Coach,” we sit down with Jon Corippo and Marlena Hebern to discuss their new book Bring Your Teaching into Focus: The EduProtocol Field Guide