Listened Is a private high school education really worth it? by Hugh Riminton from Radio National - Sunday Extra
Is a private high school education really worth the cost?
This is an important debate. I am unsure much is gained, especially when the private sector argue that they are working on equity more than the select entry public schools. It would be fair to say that this is not what Gonski was talking about in his original review.
Bookmarked Looking beyond code to make the future work for everyone (Google)
Moving beyond code and intensive degrees to these constant, lightweight and ubiquitous forms of education will take resources and experimentation. But that effort should help close today’s skills gaps, while making sure future skills gaps don’t open. That’s part of the reason Google has invested $1 billion over five years to help find new approaches to connect people to opportunities at work and help small and medium businesses everywhere grow in the digital economy. We should make sure that the next generation of jobs are good jobs, in every sense. Rather than thinking of education as the opening act, we need to make sure it’s a constant, natural and simple act across life—with lightweight, flexible courses, skills and programs available to everyone.
Sundar Pichai talks about supporting on-going education. In part this is about education, but it is also about digital literacies. I was particularly taken by the statement about creating jobs for the future:

We should make sure that the next generation of jobs are good jobs, in every sense.

I am not sure what good jobs exactly refers to or are. Good for whom and for what?

Replied to Education and the Fourth Industrial Revolution – Learning {Re}imagined – Medium by Graham Brown-Martin (Medium)
We are on the precipice of what the World Economic Forum calls the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Artificial intelligence. Automation. Ubiquitous, mobile supercomputing. Intelligent robots. Self…
Graham, i understand that we are in a time of rapid change, but I am not sure how many times I can hear the case for new jobs? My concern is that new jobs implies that there are jobs today or in the past that have not changed, is that really true?

Take education, it can be so easy to make the case that education has not changed for X amount of years, but what does that actually mean? I believe that a teaches job changes every year on a number of levels — policy, classroom, values etc. To say that things do not change dumbs things down to some meaningless context. This is one of the problems with Hattie’s ignorance of outside influences (although this seems to have been covered by the new approaches to Visible Wellbeing and Visible Parenting). I would argue that if Papert were writing, thinking and educating today then his thinking might be different too? Do you agree? Teaching changes.

Let’s take this from a different perspective, say music. I remember watching Synth Britannia, a documentary following a generation of post-punk musicians who took the synthesizer from the experimental fringes to the centre of the pop stage. One of the things that stood out was the influence of technology (synthesizers) on the sound. It can be easy to listen to some of the music now and cringe at the lack of texture of these early synthesisers, but these artists were taking the tool to its extreme. However, this movement was as much a response to politics, to society, as it was to the tool. To do the supposed ‘same’ today would not be the same in my view. Even applying constraints to replicate the recording environment, this is always a choice which you can always escape. It was not back then. However, people still record, create, produce, play music. Has the job changed? What does it actually mean to be a musician or a producer?

Maybe I have missed something? Maybe I don’t get it. I am happy for a different perspective, but I have stopped worrying about jobs and titles, because I have always found them misleading.

Bookmarked Why Are Our Most Important Teachers Paid the Least? (mobile.nytimes.com)
Many preschool teachers live on the edge of financial ruin. Would improving their training — and their pay — improve outcomes for their students?
Jeenen Interlandi provides a view into the problems associated with preschool in the USA:

Teaching preschoolers is every bit as complicated and important as teaching any of the K-12 grades, if not more so. But we still treat preschool teachers like babysitters.

This reminds me of the work of Bronwyn Hinz.

Via Ian O’Byrne’s TLDR Newsletter

Bookmarked 'We must kill this cult of measuring everything that schools do' (Tes)
The idea that the solution to the nefarious effects of constant high-stakes measurement is to bring in more high-stakes measurement – albeit of a different thing – is palpably insane. It is further evidence, if we needed any, that we have surrendered our profession to a cultish scientism whose mantra is measurement.
JT Dutaut wonders about a future where the solution to too much testing in education is more testing.
Bookmarked 'Too much control': Pasi Sahlberg on what Finland can teach Australian schools by Michael McGowan (the Guardian)
“One way to think about it is maybe, you have all these good things – funding, your economy, good teachers – but you’re not improving. Maybe the problem is that things are tied up in a system that is not able to be flexible enough for teachers. Maybe there is not enough trust in Australia in good teachers.”
An article discussing Finnish education, the importance of play in the early years, the problems with NAPLAN and a focus on equity in Australian education.
Replied to Why I Hate Homework and How the Research Backs Me Up (Imagination Soup)
Do your students spend hours a night doing homework? Mine do. And I hate it- maybe even more than they do. Most of the time they just do it and don't complain. But I'm complaining! I'd so much rather my kids get much needed down-time after school to: play, nap, read, run, swing, dance, twirl, build, create, draw, invent, or design.
Thanks for the great post Melissa. I could not agree more about homework. I feel like so many elements in education the high ground is so often held by those more conservative. Personally, I would love to scrap homework, however it is not always the overall consensus. Also, there are many parents out there who seem to believe that homework is somehow essential to success. In the end, I feel that homework underwrites the relationships that we as teachers continually try and build with students. There is nothing more depressing than the awkward conversation with parents seeming whinging about the failure to submit homework.