Bookmarked Globalizing education standards with ISO 21001 by Ben Williamson (code acts in education)
Standards may seem invisible, but they matter—they are consequential to how the world is organized, how people and their behaviour are regulated, and how processes and objects are defined and measured. Those who control standards therefore hold great power to coordinate and organize social, economic, cultural, ethical and political life. Standards constitute societies.
Ben Williamson takes a deep dive into the new ISO 21001 standard designed to structure educational management. This is significant, because such global standards have the potential to define and shape the future. As Williamson explains:

In the tangible world, standards define almost everything. There are standards for the dimensions of kitchen goods and furniture, standard measures, standard fonts and paper sizes, standard economic models, standards for food products, standard business practices, standard forms to fill in, standard formats for cataloguing and indexing, governmental standards, standard classifications of illness and healthiness, standards for ensuring software can operate on computer hardware and that data are interoperable across systems, and much more.

People are standardized too. Standard measures of personality or citizenship, standards of dress and behaviour, standards for credit-scoring and social media profiling, and standards that define social class, socio-economic status, gender, nationality and ethnicity all affect people’s everyday lives. Standard linguistic definitions help us make sense of ourselves and the world we inhabit.

ISO identifies a number of benefits in their press release:

a) better alignment of educational mission, vision, objectives and action plans
b) inclusive and equitable quality education for all
c) promotion of self-learning and lifelong learning opportunities
d) more personalized learning and effective response to special educational needs
e) consistent processes and evaluation tools to demonstrate and increase effectiveness and efficiency
f) increased credibility of the educational organization
g) recognized means to enable organizations to demonstrate commitment to education management practices in the most effective manner
h) a model for improvement
i) harmonization of national standards within an international framework
j) widened participation of interested parties
k) stimulation of excellence and innovation

The problem with this list is that there are so many biases built in and that become a guide for the global operating system.

Liked The Back to Basics Conundrum in Early Learning: Reflecting on the Past to Move us Forward (Technology Rich Inquiry Based Research)
I invited participants to create a story based on their stick and stone creations, using Tier 2 words and other literary techniques. This is a complex way of looking at a basic part of every early childhood educator’s practice – reading to children and supporting emerging writers.
Bookmarked An American Chromebook Crisis: new report shows sad trends of how students are using the devices by Andy Losik (andylosik.blogspot.com.au)
When the technological investment in five million learners is being primarily spent playing games with questionable educational benefit, taking low level assessments, and watching YouTube then we have an edtech crisis on our hands. We can have "certified this" and "distinguished that" honors in our email signatures and be "ambassadors" for a thousand apps and sites but this report shows us the grim reality of how devices are really being used.
Andy Losik provides a summary of the Go Guardian 2018 Benchmark Report: An analysis of emerging trends in Chromebook usage. He highlights his concern about what time is being spent on:

A huge amount of Chromebook use is being spent on educationally questionable video games, low level assessments, and YouTube

I think that this all highlights another point, the influence of outside influences on education. Whether it be Go Guardian, Kahoot! or Texthelp, every company is now a data company – a point Genevieve Bell makes. The concern is whose data? I wonder where such collections will sit with the changes associated with GDPR.

N.B. Don’t tell Stager!

Liked Avoid Binary Thinking. Go To The Grey. by Chris Wejr (chriswejr.com)
it is EASY to tweet a dichotomous statement in a succinct manner that gets people’s attention and gets 100s of retweets; but we often lose out on the grey and miss out on the opportunity to engage.  If we do feel the need to make a polarizing statement, we need to be willing to engage when someone challenges us.  Keep the social in social media; respond when we are respectfully challenged so the conversation can move deeper and move to the heart of the statement. We need to continually reflect, be willing to be challenged and open to others’ ideas and opinions.
Replied to Australia Day Eve Provocations (LEARN AND LEAD)
Do what’s hard. Place high expectations on yourself. Take risks. Do something that matters
Great post Greg. So much to take in as we go into the new year. The thing I was left wondering about each of the contexts were the conditions that made leadership possible in each of the scenarios. Whether it be a mandate, some sort of sacrifice or thesupport from those around us, I wondering if we also have a shared responsibility to not only lead ourselves, but also help others lead as well?
Bookmarked The Victorian State Education System…from the inside out and the outside in. by Peter Hutton (LinkedIn)
Establishing and leading one of the most progressive and innovative schools in Australia, and if the Finnish based HundrED organisation are to be believed, one of the most innovative in the world, I have often been asked what is my relationship with the DET
Former principal of Templestowe College, Peter Hutton, reflects on his connection with the Victorian Department of Education. One quote that caught my eye was this:

Unless there are parental complaints, if the school’s numbers are stable or growing and your data is tracking ok, essentially DET allow you to innovate and do as you please. I have loved this level of professional autonomy and dare I say trust shown by DET in its’ Principals. Not really the ogre that people sometimes suspect. In fact many senior staff have provided me with encouragement and professional support during the more innovative years at TC.

I have heard Hutton present before. It will be interesting to see where his ‘EdRevolution’ goes and grows.

Listened Is a private high school education really worth it? by Hugh Riminton from Radio National - Sunday Extra
Is a private high school education really worth the cost?
This is an important debate. I am unsure much is gained, especially when the private sector argue that they are working on equity more than the select entry public schools. It would be fair to say that this is not what Gonski was talking about in his original review.
Bookmarked Looking beyond code to make the future work for everyone (Google)
Moving beyond code and intensive degrees to these constant, lightweight and ubiquitous forms of education will take resources and experimentation. But that effort should help close today’s skills gaps, while making sure future skills gaps don’t open. That’s part of the reason Google has invested $1 billion over five years to help find new approaches to connect people to opportunities at work and help small and medium businesses everywhere grow in the digital economy. We should make sure that the next generation of jobs are good jobs, in every sense. Rather than thinking of education as the opening act, we need to make sure it’s a constant, natural and simple act across life—with lightweight, flexible courses, skills and programs available to everyone.
Sundar Pichai talks about supporting on-going education. In part this is about education, but it is also about digital literacies. I was particularly taken by the statement about creating jobs for the future:

We should make sure that the next generation of jobs are good jobs, in every sense.

I am not sure what good jobs exactly refers to or are. Good for whom and for what?

Replied to Education and the Fourth Industrial Revolution – Learning {Re}imagined – Medium by Graham Brown-Martin (Medium)
We are on the precipice of what the World Economic Forum calls the Fourth Industrial Revolution. Artificial intelligence. Automation. Ubiquitous, mobile supercomputing. Intelligent robots. Self…
Graham, i understand that we are in a time of rapid change, but I am not sure how many times I can hear the case for new jobs? My concern is that new jobs implies that there are jobs today or in the past that have not changed, is that really true?

Take education, it can be so easy to make the case that education has not changed for X amount of years, but what does that actually mean? I believe that a teaches job changes every year on a number of levels — policy, classroom, values etc. To say that things do not change dumbs things down to some meaningless context. This is one of the problems with Hattie’s ignorance of outside influences (although this seems to have been covered by the new approaches to Visible Wellbeing and Visible Parenting). I would argue that if Papert were writing, thinking and educating today then his thinking might be different too? Do you agree? Teaching changes.

Let’s take this from a different perspective, say music. I remember watching Synth Britannia, a documentary following a generation of post-punk musicians who took the synthesizer from the experimental fringes to the centre of the pop stage. One of the things that stood out was the influence of technology (synthesizers) on the sound. It can be easy to listen to some of the music now and cringe at the lack of texture of these early synthesisers, but these artists were taking the tool to its extreme. However, this movement was as much a response to politics, to society, as it was to the tool. To do the supposed ‘same’ today would not be the same in my view. Even applying constraints to replicate the recording environment, this is always a choice which you can always escape. It was not back then. However, people still record, create, produce, play music. Has the job changed? What does it actually mean to be a musician or a producer?

Maybe I have missed something? Maybe I don’t get it. I am happy for a different perspective, but I have stopped worrying about jobs and titles, because I have always found them misleading.