Liked 'Pools with moveable floors': the private school arms race intensifies by Henrietta Cook (The Age)
The data, released by the Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority and an accurate snapshot of spending in the nation's schools, shows the state's independent schools shelled out $552.8 million on capital works in 2016. This compares with $326.9 million for Victorian state schools, which educate 63 per cent of all students, and $343.7 million for Catholic schools.
Listened The EduProtocol Field Guide: By Jon Corippo and Marlena Hebern from The TeacherCast Educational Network
In this episode of “Ask the Tech Coach,” we sit down with Jon Corippo and Marlena Hebern to discuss their new book Bring Your Teaching into Focus: The EduProtocol Field Guide
Replied to Is your School an X or Why School? by Richard Wells (EDUWELLS)
Students and schools focussed on why they exist develop stronger engagement in all activities and this results in making achievement in what we do much easier.
I really enjoyed Sinek’s book.

One of the interesting points that I found was that ‘why’ is not necessarily something that you just sit around and decide. It involves culture and therefore action. In some respect it reminds me of trust. You cannot necessarily create ‘trust’, instead you put in place the conditions for trust to prosper. I think that the challenge we face is creating the conditions for why to prosper. I think that your book goes some way to doing this. However, I imagine that it will always be based on context and involve idiosyncrasies.

Bookmarked 10 definitions of datafication (in education) by Ben Williamson (code acts in education)
In simple terms, datafication can be said to refer to ways of seeing, understanding and engaging with the world through digital data. This definition draws attention to how data makes things visible, knowable, and explainable, and thus amenable to some form of action or intervention. However, to be a bit more specific, there are at least ten ways of defining datafication.
Ben Williamson documents ten ways of defining ‘datafication’:

  • Historically
  • Technically
  • Epistemologically
  • Ontologically
  • Socially
  • Politically
  • Culturally
  • Imaginatively
  • Dystopically
  • Legally & ethically

This is a good introduction to his book Big Data in Education.

Liked Open Letter to School District 61 on the use of Google Apps For Education (GAFE) – Brad Payne by Brad (bradpayne.ca)
Parental consent, while legally sufficient, is an insufficient mechanism to protect the privacy of children and the confidentiality of student records because: It assumes parents have adequate digital literacy to make informed choices about their children’s privacy. It assumes school district immunity despite obligations under Section 79.1.b of the B.C. School Act. It assumes Google has incentive to adequately inform parents about the risks of data retention, profiling and automated decision making. It assumes computational statistical inferences derived from machine learning algorithms doesn’t threaten the privacy of children. I offer five recommendations: Strengthen the conditions for consent to be given. Expand the definition of digital literacy and offer learning opportunities for parents and teachers. Make it as easy to withdraw consent as it is to give consent. Create meaningful alternatives for students of parents who opt out. Phase out and discontinue use of GAFE in the classroom.
This is an interesting read from Brad Payne. It comes back to Douglas Rushkoff’s argument that social media should never be used in schools. It has me thinking about the ways that data associated with private Facebook groups could be scraped surreptitiously.
Replied to ‘My Learning’ by Greg Miller (LEARN AND LEAD)
As students progress through Years 8, 9 & 10 in the coming years, there will increasingly be more and more time for students to self direct their Personalised Curriculum. This may include, but is not limited to: Acceleration of core curriculum subjects leading to early commencement of HSC in one or two subjects. If required, intervention strategies for those students who do not meet minimum national benchmark standards for literacy and numeracy. Early commencement of VET (Vocational and Educational Training) subjects either at school or through TAFE. Participation in Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs), completion of digital badge courses or informal internships with local industry experts and ‘start ups’. Self directed electives and collaborative projects as a result of students working with teachers with the following provocation: Knowing my Strengths, Motivations and Interests (SIM), how can I use my identified talents and affirmed capabilities to ensure a better world?
This is a great achievement Greg.

It has been fascinating following your thinking in this area. There are so many assumptions that go unquestioned. I am reminded of some of the work at Geelong College and Templestowe College.

My wondering is the ramification for aspects such as reporting and timetables. I remember visiting a school that had gone down a similar path for Year 6’s and listening to the amount of work that went into creating ‘personalised’ report templates. Will this just come back to your template around your six pillars? I was speaking with a representative from Compass who told me about CENet contract.

I know that it seems trivial, however I think that these tedious elements are often overlooked and I would love to know your thoughts.

Liked ‘Monocropping the Mind’ by Benjamin Doxtdator (Long View on Education)
On one level, the human capital narrative creates a restrictive idea of what is a valuable aim for education, most often preparing students for jobs in STEM. While national prosperity is supposed to hang on this monoculture experiment, there’s also a calculation that some – many – will fail unless they have the entrepreneurial skills and grit to make something of themselves. On another level, this free-market ideology is indeed an artificial ecology, propped up by massive (and often unacknowledged) state investment in information technology and biotech sectors and a stripping back of social services. We have gotten to a point where, as Shiva argues, alternatives are closed and killed off.