Watched

The environmental impact of border walls, explained.

Read more about the border wall’s effect on wildlife here: http://bit.ly/2GUHzqN

When we talk about the consequences of the proposed wall at the border of the US and Mexico, we usually think in terms of people. But along the political divide are rich pockets of biodiversity, with dwindling populations of species that rely on the ability to move back and forth across the border.

Under the 2005 REAL ID act, the Department of Homeland Security doesn’t have to comply with various environmental laws that might otherwise slow or halt construction in a sensitive area. Laws like the Endangered Species Act, the Clean Water Act, the National Environmental Policy Act or the Migratory Bird Treaty Act — none of those apply to border wall construction.

Several parcels of land, including the National Butterfly Center, a state park, and other areas in the federal wildlife refuge system — are still threatened by wall construction. It could still be years before construction starts in some of these areas — but there’s still a lot we don’t know about the full impact of barriers on biodiversity.

📓 Seams vs. Stitches

In an article discussing the state of Macbooks and iPads, Baldur Bjarnason discusses the difference between seams and stitches when it comes to design:

Seamlessness isn’t pretty; it’s opaque and obscures the underlying structures of the tool you are making.

A stitch or a seam isn’t ugly; it’s an affordance that exposes the design, construction, and make of what you’ve made in a way that lends itself to learning.

Beauty and uniformity are two entirely independent characteristics. Seamlessness can look ugly and stitches can be pretty.

Good design can only be seamless when it has just one job to do. Add more jobs and seamlessness becomes a hindrance.source

Replied to Craig Mod’s subtle redesign of the hardware Kindle (Doug Belshaw's Thought Shrapnel)
This is user interface design, or UI design for short. It’s important stuff, for as Steve Jobs famously said: “Everything in this world… was created by people no smarter than you” — and that’s particularly true in tech.
I must admit, I am new to the whole design world. Even though it drives me crazy at times – often because I have little control or influence over it – it is one of the things that I have enjoyed about my current work. Thinking deeply about users and how to streamline various processes has been really interesting.
Replied to Re-thinking the Homepage by Eddie Hinkle (eddiehinkle.com)
This is definitely not the end of my site revisions, it’s really just the start. But it allows me to use this for awhile and see what I like and don’t like.
I really like the look of this Eddie. I have always looked on at Chris Aldrich’s site and felt that it was a little bit beyond what I was after. However, you provide a different approach and show how it may not need to be so complicated. I do however like Aldrich’s breakdown of the different Post Kinds as a sort of menu.