Replied to Something Weird is Happening on Twitter Right Now by an author (Tempered Radical)

What if instead of using social spaces to simply share content, we made a New Year’s Resolution to engage in more conversations with one another? What if we made a commitment to ask more provocative questions or to play the Devil’s Advocate more often?

Even better Bill is if we had such conversations from the comfort of our own backyard using bridgy and webmenbtions, rather than someone else’s playground?
Replied to Digital Citizenship: Where Are We Now? by Dean Shareski

Let me share a few ideas about how we might think about digital citizenship moving forward.

Continue to think of it as citizenship and not digital.
Spend time reflecting on what it means to be a good citizen.
Cite examples of positive and negative use of technology and social media
Get very comfortable with the nuances and reserve judgment. Let kids decide what and if social media has value and where its problematic
Talk about mental health and technology
Explore the research on the brain and stress
Engage in experiments of restraints and disconnection
Include the adults. This is not exclusively an issue for kids but an issue for everyone
Think carefully about any policies you enact
Don’t make it punitive. Even if you conclude you think mobile phones are a distraction, focus on the benefits for students. Allow them to recognize it as a distraction. This isn’t about control but it should be about informed choices.
Be okay with teachers having different policies. Not every discipline warrants the use of technology. If a teacher doesn’t see value, don’t force them to use it. Conversely if a teacher does see value don’t restrict them.

I find it a difficult conversation to flip from talking about the constructive use of technology to being more critical. I feel that the first challenge is being informed, while the next step is to develop better habits.

In regards to your balanced approach you maybe interested in Ian Guest’s work exploring Twitter to support professional development. It provides some novel insights and questions.

Knowing that you don’t read my blog, in am intrigued what your collection of ideas looks like in a world without social media? Maybe that is a good place to start?

Bookmarked Are All Voices Equal? – Ideas and Thoughts (ideasandthoughts.org)

I’m grateful for the advent of the web and social media by providing me with a voice. I’ve been able to publish many ideas over that last 12 years that previously would have only lived in my head. Through that publishing, I’ve been able to think through some things and had the benefit of others to add their thoughts as well. However, as much as this has democratized knowledge, it has also diluted the importance of expertise. The barriers of the previous publishing world lacked the ability to include all voices but it did help identify expertise. As adults and educators, I think we have to work harder to identify the smart people and allow their ideas to be heard over the din of social media. Expertise is not found in followers but on the quality and evidence of ideas that have proven the test of time.

Dean Shareski reflects on the place of voice in education. Whether it be students in the classroom or educators online, he argues that there are times when some voices are more important than others. This continues the argument that Thomas Guskey recently made about merely searching the web. I wonder where this leaves participatory culture, comments and blogging? Is it a reminder that such acts are first and fore-mostly selfish?
Liked Technology as Distraction – Ideas and Thoughts (ideasandthoughts.org)

Schools have not traditionally been asked to care for student’s health beyond a mandatory few classes. This isn’t as exciting as helping kids become entrepreneurs, creating an app, getting a scholarship or even just helping them graduate. Talking about the power and potential of technology is exciting and very palatable. I should know, I’ve done this and continue to get invited to share messages that promote technology as a powerful tool for learning. I’m not going to stop but I have and will continue to embed hard truths and realities about focusing on what really matters.

Replied to Still Amusing Ourselves To Death – Ideas and Thoughts (ideasandthoughts.org)

Trying to be a truly informed citizen today is almost impossible. As an educator, this is where we have an enormous challenge. My work and presentations have me dabbling at this and yet being frustrated by the cultural tsunami of trite, bias and untruths bites that flood our feeds.

There is something uncanny about reading historical texts. I recently read a critique of MOOCs, only to then discover that it was five years old.

In your reflections I was taken by your current stance to:

  • Talk less.
  • Question everything.
  • Utilize the right spaces for the right purposes.

This is similar to my own recent reflection to:

  • Critically Reflect and Ask Questions
  • Learn from and through others
  • Engage in new challenges.

Social spaces have changed. They are not what they once were. However, it is disconcerting when we were warned so long ago.

I am off to find a copy of Amusing Ourselves to Death and dig into the past a little bit more.