Replied to Too Long; Didn’t Read #158 (W. Ian O'Byrne)
Each week when I write this newsletter, it is always interesting to me to see stories that suggest that social media is downright bad for us. For people that are hooked, it is like a drug. For people that don’t use social media and networks, they don’t understand why people care, or use these tools.
Ian, the irony of the JSON change is that I downloaded my content and cleaned it up months ago. Really hoping that someone develops an easy to use parser one day so that I can store all my statuses and check-ins in my site, even if they are private.
Liked Monetizing Your Device Location Data With LotaData (apievangelist.com)
In a world where our data is the new oil, I’m interested in any way that I can help level the playing field, and seeing how we can put more control back into the device owners hands. Allowing mobile phone, wearable, drone, automobile, and other connected device owners to aggregate and monetize their own data in a personal or professional capacity. Helping us all better understand the value of our own bits, and potentially generating some extra cash from its existence. I don’t think any of us are going to get rich doing this, but if we can put a little cash back in our own pockets, and limit the exploitation of our bits by other companies and device manufacturers, it might change the game to be a little more in our favor.
Replied to Too Long; Didn’t Read #157 (W. Ian O'Byrne)

Some computer science academics at Northeastern University ran an experiment testing over 17,000 of the most popular apps on Android to see if they’re collecting information and sending it back somewhere else. They found no evidence of an app unexpectedly activating the microphone or sending audio out when not prompted to do so. Like good scientists, they refuse to say that their study definitively proves that your phone isn’t secretly listening to you, but they didn’t find a single instance of it happening. Instead, they discovered a different disturbing practice: apps recording a phone’s screen and sending that information out to third parties.

I thought that it was just me with the strange feeling like I am being listened too. Really disconcerting that instead they are capturing images. This is a worry on multiple levels. That any semblance of privacy has seemingly left the building, but also the waste associated with collecting such data.

I am reminded of the discussion of a big data tax mentioned in Sabeel Rahman’s post The New Octopus. James Bridle also talks about the ‘Age of the Image’ in the New Dark Age:

As digital culture becomes faster, higher bandwidth, and more image-based, it also becomes more costly and destructive – both literally and figuratively. It requires more input and energy, and affirms the supremacy of the image – the visual representation of data – as the representation of the world.

Replied to Making Sense of Blog Post Content Data? My Own Spanner Found in the Bottom of the Toolbox (CogDogBlog)
For the obviously obvious statement, WordPress is built on a database. The question is, besides data like visitor counts, what can you infer from the data in the posts and metadata itself?
I am always fascinated what data we are collecting, whether conscious of it or not.

This reminds me of Tom Woodward’s work with Sheets and data. I wonder if this will work for Post Kinds too? Off to dig around in the code.

The good news for both advertising and publishing is that neither needs adtech. What’s more, people can signal what they want out of the sites they visit—and from the whole marketplace. In fact the Internet itself was designed for exactly that. The GDPR just made the market a lot more willing to start hearing clues from customers that have been laying in plain sight for almost twenty years.

Doc Searls

A reflection on looking at cars and sharing data.

The Tyranny of Metrics; and the Dark Web
http://www.abc.net.au/radionational/programs/futuretense/the-tyranny-of-metrics-and-the-dark-web/9831438
In the first half of this episode of Future Tense, Antony Funnell speaks with Dr Jerry Muller about his book The Tyranny of Metrics. The conversation provides a useful provocation when it comes to metrics and measurements. It is interesting listening to this alongaide Alfie Kohn’s book Punished by Reward and Cathy O’Neill’s Weapons of Math Destruction.

The second part of the episode addresses the Dark Web.

Bookmarked Privacy Postcards, or Poison Pill Privacy by Bill FitzgeraldBill Fitzgerald (FunnyMonkey)

For those who want to use this structure to create your own Privacy Postcards, I have created a skeleton structure on Github. Please, feel free to clone this, copy it, modify it, and make it your own.

Bill Fitzgerald provides a framework for unpacking privacy when it comes to apps, especially in the Play Store.
Bookmarked The 12-month turnaround: How the dumpers drove oBike out of town (The Age)
The controversial and distinctive yellow bicycles operated by Singaporean company oBike will soon disappear as quickly as they appeared.
I remember when I first saw an oBike in action, a guy rolled up to a train station and dumped it near the on ramp. In this article from The Age, Simone Fox Koob reflects on their rise and fall in Melbourne. The dockless bike share scheme is managed by an mobile app. After concerns were raised around Uber, I was sceptical of the data collected by the company. I feel the disruption may have gone too far and caused the creative revolt.

The ET oBike

It will be interesting to see how competitors respond and what – if any – changes they make.

Liked Facebook Gave Device Makers Deep Access to Data on Users and Friends by Gabriel J.X. Dance (nytimes.com)
In the furor that followed, Facebook’s leaders said that the kind of access exploited by Cambridge in 2014 was cut off by the next year, when Facebook prohibited developers from collecting information from users’ friends. But the company officials did not disclose that Facebook had exempted the makers of cellphones, tablets and other hardware from such restrictions.