Listened IRL Podcast: Checking Out Online Shopping by an author from irlpodcast.org

When you shop, your data may be the most valuable thing for sale. This isn’t just true online — your data follows you into brick and mortar stores now as well. Manoush Zomorodi explores the hidden costs of shopping, online and off. Meet Meta Brown, a data scientist who unveils the information Amazon captures about you when you make an online purchase; Joseph Turow, who discusses how retailers are stripping us of our privacy; and Alana Semuels, who talks about becoming a hoarder with the advent of online shopping. Plus, learn about a college coffee shop where you can actually buy a drink with your data. (Is it worth it?)

This discussion of big data reminds me a comment by Ben Williamson in regards to ‘sensitive’ data captured by Class Dojo:

ClassDojo has been dealing with privacy concerns since its inception, and it has well-rehearsed responses. Its reply to The Times was: ‘No part of our mission requires the collection of sensitive information, so we don’t collect any. … We don’t ask for or receive any other information [such as] gender, no email, no phone number, no home address.’ But this possibly misses the point. The ‘sensitive information’ contained in ClassDojo is the behavioural record built up from teachers tapping reward points into the app.

It would seem that sometimes it is not the comments on social media we make or the food that we purchase from Uber Eats, but the actual purchasing of such items that matters. To focus on the noun, ignores the ‘information’ provided by the verb.

Liked Companies keep losing your data because it doesn't cost them anything by an author (Array)
If companies were paying out damages commensurate with the social costs their data recklessness imposes on the rest of us, it would have a very clarifying effect on their behavior -- insurers would get involved, refusing to write E&O policies for board members without massive premium hikes, etc. A little would go a long way, here.
Bookmarked How TripAdvisor changed travel by an author (the Guardian)
The long read: The world’s biggest travel site has turned the industry upside down – but now it is struggling to deal with the same kinds of problems that are vexing other tech giants like Facebook, Google and Twitter
I recently recieved an email from Trip Advisor informing me of a ‘big announcement’:

Imagine if everything you love about TripAdvisor was personalized around the friends and travel experts you follow, giving you an easy way to plan and make the most of every trip.

It was interesting thinking about this after reading the long read from Linda Kinstler discussing the rise of the platform. I wonder if it would have been better worked as:

Imagine if you provided TripAdvisor with a list of all your friends and those who you deem as ‘experts’ so that we can then use the profile to better target you with advertising on the web

Read Write Microcast #016 - Computer Games, Now and Then

That data-centric world seemed benign at first — smartness that helped us. We gave up data about ourselves, and the technology around us got smarter.(Genevieve Bell)

In this return to microcasting, I reflect on playing Command and Conquer and the way in which computer games have changed over time.

Bookmarked Friction-Free Racism — Real Life by an author (Real Life)
The end game of a surveillance society, from the perspective of those being watched, is to be subjected to whims of black-boxed code extended to the navigation of spaces, which are systematically stripped of important social and cultural clues. The personalized surveillance tech, meanwhile, will not make people less racist; it will make them more comfortable and protected in their racism.
Chris Gilliard unpacks the inherent racism encoded into the operations of the surveillance state. See for example Spotify’s recent announcement to add genealogy data to their algorithm. As a part of this investigation, Gilliard provides a number of questions to consider when thinking about such data.
Listened Ep. 106 Nora Bateson “Warm Data” from teamhuman.fm

Playing for Team Human today is systems thinker, writer, and filmmaker Nora Bateson. Nora will be telling us how to stop looking at things as objects and begin seeing the spaces and connections between

In a discussion with Douglas Rushkoff, Nora Bateson discusses the concept of ‘Warm Data’ and the interconnected nature of everything.

“Warm Data” is information about the interrelationships that integrate elements of a complex system. It has found the qualitative dynamics and offers another dimension of understanding to what is learned through quantitative data, (cold data).(source)

For Bateson, it is the relationships which bring the data alive.

This stems from the notion of ‘warm ideas’, as idea that leads you into another idea of relations. In this circumstance it is about going beyond departments and instead focusing on context.

The underlying premise of the IBI is to address and experiment with how we perceive. Our mandate is to look in other ways so that we might find other species of information and new patterns of connection not visible though current methodologies. We call this information “Warm Data”.(Mission Statement)

I was not exactly sure what this all looks like in practice, but did take away that it was about working together.

Liked Teacher learning, not student test results, should be a national priority for Australia (EduResearch Matters)
Useful data can also include teachers’ notes about student academic progress more generally, their level of attentiveness in class, as well as about their well-being and social engagement with their peers, and other adults in the school. Seeking to work productively with a wide and deep array of data, beyond simply standardized measures, is the key to fostering substantive teacher learning for student learning.