Replied to Google Is Collecting Your Data—Even When Your Phone Isn’t in Use (adweek.com)
Google collected considerably more user data when mobile phones were moving around and were in use. One researcher carried around a factory-reset Android phone with a new Google Account and used it as she went about the regular course of the day. That data, the researchers concluded, was pretty reliable. Google was ultimately able to identify that researcher’s interests “with remarkable accuracy” over the course of the 24-hour period, they wrote.
I am left wondering how much of this ‘tracking’ is associated with our move to cloud computing? How much does Microsoft capture? And does Apple even provide like for like? Is their offering as comprehensive? I feel that in general we need to get better at appreciating data that is being collected.

via Audrey Watters

Liked Canberra education system set for 10-year overhaul in move to 'personalised learning' - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) (mobile.abc.net.au)
instead of filing into a gym hall to write in silence under a ticking clock, the ACT Government wants to leverage big data to keep a "minute-to-minute" pulse on how students are learning. "Wouldn't it be wonderful if at any point along their educational journey, students were able to get really responsive feedback? Technology needs to enhance learning," Mr Willis said.
Liked Why the NAPLAN results delay is a storm in a teacup by Jim Tognolini (The Conversation)

The real issue underpinning the controversy is the misuse of NAPLAN data. It was never intended that NAPLAN data would be used for fine-grained comparison of students.

The MySchool website has contributed to the misuse of NAPLAN data. For example, the scores from the site are being used to make comparisons irrespective of the “error bands” that need to be taken into account when making comparisons. People are ascribing a level of precision to the results that was never intended when the tests were developed. The test was never designed to be high-stakes and the results should not be used as such.

When people challenge the “validity” of the NAPLAN test, they should be challenging the validity of the use of the results. NAPLAN has a high degree of validity, but we need to understand it better and use the results in a more judicious and defensible manner. The correct use of NAPLAN data is a major issue and it needs to be addressed as a matter of priority.

Bookmarked The Information on School Websites Is Not as Safe as You Think by E.K. Moore (nytimes.com)
Some tracking scripts may be harmless. But others are designed to recognize I.P. addresses and embed cookies that collect information prized by advertisers.
E.K. Moore discusses the presence of trackers on school websites. One of the interesting points was the impact of YouTube on all this:

Google’s DoubleClick ad trackers, for instance, are commonly found on school pages that host YouTube videos, like the Community Website Introduction video on a school site in Massapequa, on New York’s Long Island. The trackers tee up videos containing advertising on the school page, once its own video finishes playing.

I have reflected upon this topic elsewhere.

Replied to Celebrating the things we don’t measure by Gillian Light (a macgirl in a pc world)
  • how much more my students now speak in weekly literature circle discussions and how well prepared they are for what they want to say;
  • how engrossed they are in reading and how invested they are in the characters they identify with;
  • the quality of their questioning and the deep thinking they do about what they read, identifying themes, ideas and wonderings that hadn’t occurred to me;
  • their heightened understanding of how certain text types can be very powerful and really get things done, as seen through the number of them wanting to write to different levels of government after our parliamentary excursion;
  • their confidence in managing their own learning and identifying their own goals, inside and outside of the classroom;
  • their growing time and resource management skills that now see some of them much more able to find the key items they need at the start of the day and end the day feeling organised;
  • the coping strategies they have developed to deal with their own times of stress or anxiety and which they now avail themselves of without any need for a reminder from me;
  • the empathy they have developed towards not only each other but towards fellow human beings in the world beyond our classroom, as evident in the ideas they have about how they can improve their world for everyone’s benefit.
I remember a few years ago, when the new review process came in, I made every effort to stretch what the notion of data. Most teachers just fell into line with the simplicity of one years growth for one years teaching. Although ‘growth’ is important, to only focus on the summative feels like it misses something.