Replied to Tangle Logic by Venkatesh RaoVenkatesh Rao (ribbonfarm.com)

Millennia of human building have convinced us that orderliness (with or without greebles) is somehow efficient and tangles are “messy and inefficient.” And it’s not a modern or even medieval phenomenon. I recall my high-school history teacher instructing us that the streets of Indus Valley cities were “efficient” because they intersected at right angles and were “well-laid out” in an obviously planned way, compared to other Bronze Age peer civilizations. She taught us the usual textbook justification: that this somehow made them self-cleaning because the wind swept the streets naturally. More modern thought typically treats straight lines anywhere (roads from capitals to airports, and colonial-era boundaries being the classic examples) as a mark of an authoritarian presence. There may be some accidental benefits for narrow use cases, such as street-sweeping by prevailing winds, but that’s not the reason they exist. They exist because an authoritarian has carved out an island of surplus resources for himself and his buddies, and decided to lay it out as a neat, untangled zone.

Complex answers, how else to describe a complex world? This reminds me of Dave Cormier’s discuss of complicated and complex in education.
Listened Just-In-Time or Just-In-Case economy? from abc.net.au

A little known management theory called Just-In-Time was originally devised to make supply chains in the Japanese car industry more efficient. In the second decade of the 21st century it underpins all economic and organisational activity right across the globe

But a growing number of economists and business management experts believe the Just-In-Time philosophy has reduced the resilience of industry and influenced the casualisation of employment. And in a time of coronavirus, they argue, it now threatens our future economic and social wellbeing.

Antony Funnell leads a conversation into fragility of just-in-time supply chains. This feels like it touches on the work of Nassim Nicholas Taleb.
Bookmarked Sportsbet’s big punt (ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation))

The barrage of blokey ads. The sponsorship signage. The steady drip of endorsements by smiling sports stars.

Online betting giants are pumping millions into the battle for the minds and wallets of Australian punters, with a singular aim: making you reach for your phone.

Now a 7.30 investigation can reveal details about the powerful machinery behind one of the country’s leading sports betting operators — a company that has spent nearly half a billion dollars over five years on endeavours aimed at tightening its grip on this rapidly growing market.

Paul Farrell, Inga Ting and Amy Donaldson investigate the tangled web of influence associated with SportsBet. From various sporting clubs to the tech giants, the 7:30 Report uncovers the ways in which the betting company has managed to spend nearly half a billion on advertising in a five year period. This reminds me of a post from Tom Cummings from a few years ago looking at the roll gambling had in relation to Hawthorne’s grand final success.