Bookmarked Getting personal: conferring with learners as they inquire by Kath Murdoch
Critical to the success of our experience with personal inquiry is the role of the teacher in conferring with learners. Far from being a routine that allows learners to simply โ€œgo off on their ownโ€ , teachers are working the room as coaches, guides, observers and co-researchers. Scheduled and spontaneous conferences are the mainstay of the teachersโ€™ role during iTime.
Kath Murdoch discusses the importance of conferring during the inquiry process. These conversations can contribute to formative assessment, getting to know students building trust, providing feedback and learning about learning. To support all this, Murdoch provides a list of tips and questions, such as providing multiple ideas if suggesting solutions or articulating what the child has taught you. I have found one of the biggest challenges with conferencing is to support students in owning this. In a different post,Tom Whitby discusses the power associated with communicating and conferring with parents and explains how this can influence our knowledge of students and the way they learn.
Bookmarked Why we hate using email but love sending texts by Bryan Lufkin (bbc.com)
They both allow us to stay in touch, but while email often attracts ire, text messaging is more popular than ever. Is the way we choose to communicate saying more than we might think?
Bryan Lufkin reflects on the changes associated with our use of email overtime. Whereas it was restricted to a few users, now everyone (and every company) has your address now. The argument made is that people are now more willing to text or ‘snap’. I wonder if this is due to the lack of novelty provided by other spaces? This article provides a different perspective than Quinn Norton’s history of the technology.