Liked Why is machine learning 'hard'? (ai.stanford.edu)

Machine learning often boils down to the art of developing an intuition for where something went wrong (or could work better) when there are many dimensions of things that could go wrong (or work better). This is a key skill that you develop as you continue to build out machine learning projects: you begin to associate certain behavior signals with where the problem likely is in your debugging space.

Replied to Issue #149 of the TL;DR Newsletter - rethinking the simple bare necessities. by (TLDR)
Interesting view from Tom Hulme of Google Ventures arguing that teaching kids to code isn’t the future proofed ticket to future jobs as framed by many people. Deep machine learning will likely automate the writing of code relatively quickly. Creativity is going to be far more important in a future where software can code better than we can.
Wondering Ian if ‘coding’ can actually be a part of creativity? In my current work, I need to think creatively to design a solution that can accommodate a number of scenarios and situations, while at the same time being relatively simple. For me, this is about working within the constraints. I may not know how to code my solutions, but I am not going to buy a future where I have no knowledge of the way things work. I work with too many people who think they can make decisions (creative or critical) without understanding the context at hand.
Bookmarked Programming with Scratch – An educator guide. (ReconfigurED.)
Scratch is a graphical programming language and online community where users can program and share interactive media such as stories, games and animations. Whilst it is targeted at 8 to 16 year olds, anyone of any age can write a program in Scratch.
Anthony Speranza provides a useful introduction to Scratch. An often underrated application, Scratch provides an insight into some of the ways that the web works, particularly in regards to ‘blocks’. Sometimes it feels as if you are not really coding unless you are working with some form of language. The problem is that this is not how the world works. More often than not it is about building on the ideas (and snippets) of others. Look at WordPress’ move to Gutenberg. In addition to this, we interact with ‘blocks’ each and everyday in the applications and sites that we use. One only needs to use something like Mozilla’s X-Ray Goggles to start realising that inherent complexity within the web.
Bookmarked Critical Digital Fluency Revisited by Tom Woodward (bionicteaching.com)
I had the chance to talk to the kind folks from Middlebury about digital fluency Friday. I’ll probably do a better job getting into the depth of things with this as I was moving pretty rapidly for the 20 minute presentation. It’s also super-meta in a way that’s hard to articulate verbally so I...
Tom Woodward presented at Middlebury on the topic of ‘digital fluency’. These notes capture his thinking as he walks through different aspects associated with the topic. One thing that interested me was his discussion of the URL:

I started with the idea of the link/URL. It’s a uniquely digital capability. I used the Wikipedia structure to point out that the various flavors move you between languages for the same article. You may or may not notice something like that but knowing it gives you a bit of power, it opens an avenue of consideration, and it becomes a tool you can use with or without the web designer giving it to you directly.

I also turned a part of the text into a visual graphic which was included within a post on coding.

URL and Travel

“URL and https://readwriterespond.com/2018/01/hidden-code/Travel” by mrkrndvs is licensed under CC BY-SA