Liked πŸ‘“ Apps of a Feather by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
If I was sitting on a huge pile of Twitter related code with a full set of Twitter related reading/posting functionality, I think I’d head toward some of the new open protocols coming out of the IndieWeb to build a new user base. By supporting feeds like RSS, ATOM, JSON feed, and even h-feed (possibly via Microsub) for the feed reader portion and building in the open Micropub spec, one could rejuvenate old Twitter apps to work with a myriad of microblog-like (and even traditional blog) functionality on platforms like WordPress, Drupal, Craft, WithKnown, Jekyll, Kirby, Hugo, micro.blog, and a myriad of others in the future. Suddenly all those old Twitter apps could rise from the ashes and invigorate a new, more open community. Given the open β€œarchitecture” of the community, it would give developers much more direct control of both their software and futures than Twitter has ever given them as well as a deeper sense of impact while simultaneously eating a nice portion of Twitter’s lunch. With less than a week’s worth of work, I suspect that many of these old apps could have new and more fruitful lives than the scraps they were getting before.
Replied to 🎧 β€˜The Daily’: Can Facebook Be Fixed? | The New York Times by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
I’m coming much closer to calling it quits on Facebook. I’ve outlined a plan for extracting myself and just need to begin implementation. I’ve even got a potential scalable plan for family/friends who would like to leave as well.
My Facebook account has lay dormant for a year or so. I feel that leaving would not be so hard, however I really want a workable archive. I really like what Jonathon LaCour did. Just feel that all that parsing is Generation 1 and that is not me. I wonder if this is an #IndieWeb opportunity? To develop a meaningful extraction plan that includes keeping a working archive?

I am also mindful that simply leaving is only one part of the puzzle.

Listened An Indieweb Podcast Episode 0 by David ShanskeDavid Shanske from David Shanske
This is a test episode of An Indieweb Podcast(working title). In it, Chris Aldrich and I talk about a variety of Indieweb topics, with the theme of Considering the User, inspired by an article we were reading.

I really enjoyed this David and Chris. It was a wonderful insight into the #IndieWeb community. A couple of take-aways:

  1. The possibilities associated with Post-Kinds. I am wondering if instead of creating additional tags and categories that I need to craft my own kinds to differentiate between podcasts and music.
  2. I feel that the future lies in the community. I concur with Chris that I do not think that my place is coding the future. Instead I think that my contribution is in testing and trialing different additions. A point that I made in response to Eli Mellen.

If theis were to become a semi-regular occurance, it would be good to have a basic summary of discussions, as well as links to support further investigations.

Oh, and in regards to ‘impact’ (something that we love in the education world), it encouraged me to add GitHub to Bridgy. Thank you for the support and community as always.

Bookmarked Feed reader revolution by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
It's time to embrace open & disrupt social media
Aldrich outlines some of the current problems associated with social media. This includes reducing external access (see Medium) in an effort to control the content. For at the end of the day, they are simply content management systems. What is needed though is an integrated reader that allows for the ability to easily interact. Enter the #IndieWeb and the missing pieces to the puzzle, such as webmentions and micropub.

In a different post, Aldrich extends this discussion by breaking down his workflow. He explains how he uses of Inoreader to sort through content and then saves content to his site. He also uses Calibre and Kindle to manage documents.

Adding to this discussion, Aaron Parecki has released an IndieWeb Reader which builds on these pieces and processes for an integrated solution. I think that the challenge moving forward is the simplicity of such solutions for Generation 3 and 4.

Replied to Thoughts on linkblogs, bookmarks, reads, likes, favorites, follows, and related links (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
How I view these content types on my personal website/online commonplace book.
This is a useful reflection Chris. I find the correlation with social media spaces interesting. For example, what maybe a clap in one space maybe a star in another. I have down the path of organising my space around contributions, creations and response.

In regards to ‘responses’ I have discussed my different uses before. Basically, they follow the structure of Post Kinds, but there are times when I break them down further using tags:

  • πŸ“‘ / Bookmarks: Used for posts of interest, with added commentary and quotes added.
  • πŸ‘ / Likes: Used for links that I have little to say about, but want to like. The same as a +1 on Google+ or a star on Mastodon.
  • πŸ€” / Questions: A cross between a bookmark and a reply, questions are used as a means of posing wonderings and what ifs.
  • πŸ’¬ / Replies: Although in part serving the same purpose as a bookmark, replies allow for an interaction with the author.
  • πŸ“š / Reads: Used to collect together marginalia associated with books. I usually just bookmark articles.
  • 🎧 / Podcasts: Similar to a bookmarks and likes, this indicates podcasts.i haved listened to and engaged with.
  • 🎡 / Music: This is for reviews and reflections on music.
  • πŸ“Ί / Watched: Used for video I have watched, particular online. Although these are sometimes kept as bookmarks when they involve mixed media.
  • πŸ“° / Newsletters: My newsletter provides an opportunity to review the various bookmarks saved throughout the month. Although this could be automated using a platform like MailChimp (as Doug Belshaw does), I choose to do this manually and further add to my commentary.

I must admit that I am always making minor changes. It is far from set.

Replied to Enabling two way communication with WordPress and GitHub for Issues by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
This week, using the magic of open web standards, I was able to write an issue post on my own website, automatically syndicate a copy of it to GitHub, and later automatically receive a reply to the copy on GitHub back to my original post as a comment there. This gives my personal website a means of ...
Chris I love the methodical approach you provide here. As I read it allows me to easily identify what I have already done or still need to do. My only hiccup is Bridgy Publish.

Everything that I have read seems to state that this is easy or seemingly obvious. I registered with Bridgy years ago. I then had issues attaching accounts to Bridgy Publish.

I probobly should document this properly. Always thought that it was me, so turned to other plugins, such as IndieWeb and SNAP.

Bookmarked Seth's Blog: Delighting in sacrifice by Seth Godin (sethgodin.typepad.com)
The act of sacrifice, of foregoing one thing in our journey toward another one, one more generous, virtuous and useful, is actually a little piece of the satisfaction of the goal itself. If it comes easy, it's not the same.
There are some who complain about the effort associated with commenting from my own site, especially when you often have to comment on the other site as well. Yet without people making this ‘sacrifice’ for a deomstratebly better web.
Replied to Reply to Storify Bites the Dust. If You Have WordPress, You Don’t Need Another Third Party Clown Service (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
Better than relying on the auto-embed handled by WordPress, actually copy the entire embed from Twitter to capture the text and content from the original.
I really like your point Chris in regards to the difference between the shortcode and the embed code. I wonder if there is a potential to build on Martin Hawksey’s TAGS work to smash the different parts together in Sheets rather than manually copying the embed code for each Tweet. Something like this:

=β€œ<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p dir="ltr" lang="en">”&text&” β€” (@”&from_user&”) β€œ&source&” β€œ&created_at” <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8">”

I still need to think about how to accommodate “twitter-tweet” so that Sheets reads this as text too.

Doing it this way would allow users to download a list of their tweets and potentially paste the IDs into tags and then generate the embed code.