Bookmarked Chernobyl’s radiation legacy: Zombie reactors and an invisible enemy – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
Linton Besser, Mark Doman, Alex Palmer and Nathanael Scott report on the invisible legacy that is nuclear radiation that will continue to haunt parts of Europe for hundreds and even thousands of years. As Sofia Bezverhaya, a resident who lived then and still now within 30 kilometres of the Chernobyl reactor:

This fallout was an “invisible enemy”, Sofia said. Although she “neither saw it nor felt it [and] it had no colour and no taste”, it would go on to take the lives of many of those close to her.

People are still suffering the ill effects from eating contaminated food, such as milk and berries.

As of January, of the 2.1 million people registered with Ukraine’s health authorities for treatment for Chernobyl-related illnesses, 350,000 were children.

The biggest concern is that with ageing facilities and lapsed safety standards due to financial pressures, it is feasible for another catastrophe to occur:

“This is why we call them zombie reactors, because on the one hand, we have them running. We use the electricity from them. And from the other hand, we understand that there are safety shortcomings in those reactors that might lead to an accident with the potential major consequences.” Iryana Holovko said.

The episode of Foreign Correspondent can be viewed here:

via ABC Weekend Readspo

Bookmarked How plants reclaimed Chernobyl’s poisoned land (bbc.com)

Trees and other kinds of vegetation have proven to be remarkably resilient to the intense radiation around the nuclear disaster zone.

Stuart Thompson discusses the rewilding of the environment around Chernobyl. This reminds me of the discussion of radioactive blueberries on the Guardian’s Today in Focus podcast.