Replied to Browser Hygiene for Better Privacy – Think of it Like Washing Your Hands Online! by Bill FitzgeraldBill Fitzgerald (funnymonkey.com)

With these steps in place — a distinct browser profile for work and school, some tuned settings in the browser to increase protection, and some ad blocking paired with a password manager — you have made some real improvements in safeguarding your privacy. The first few days you use this setup, it might feel awkward. That’s okay – it’s a new way of working, and change generally feels awkward.

Stick with it. As the steps become familiar, this way of working will become second nature — and that’s a skill you will need after the pandemic is over. It’s not like adtech and the other companies that track us are going away anytime soon.

I remember Doug Belshaw writing something similar for a Chromebook a few years ago.
Bookmarked Unity (adactio.com)

On the face of it, more unity sounds good. It sounds like more collaboration. More cooperation.

But then I think of situations where complete unity isn’t necessarily a good thing. Take political systems, for example. If you have hundreds of different political parties, that’s not ideal. But if you only have one political party, that’s very bad indeed!

There’s a sweet spot somewhere in between where there’s a base of level of agreement and cooperation, but there’s also plenty of room for disagreement and opposition. Right now, the browser landscape is just about still in that sweet spot. It’s like a two-party system where one party has a crushing majority. Checks and balances exist, but they’re in peril.

Jeremy Keith reflects on the release of the new Edge browser built on top of Chromium.