Replied to The Edublogger’s Guide To Podcasting by Kathleen Morris (The Edublogger)
This guide helps teachers and students learn how to consume and create their own podcasts.
This is a thorough guide Kathleen. I think that podcasts offer so much potential. I have written before about creating podcasts with Edublogs, as well as collected together a number of resources and reflections.

One of the challenges I have faced of late is creating using a Chromebook. I love Audacity, but this is not an option. I wonder if the addition of Android apps will alleviate this. Interestingly, it is easier to edit video on a Chromebook, than audio.

A development that I have engaged lately is the idea of microcasts. I think that as a model, it offers a different entry point. In some ways Flipgrid captures some of this.

Another useful tool is Jon Udell’s work around clipping video and audio. This then allows you to embed snippets, therefore offering yet another entry point.

Bookmarked 16 Curation Tools for Teachers and Students by Kasey Bell (Shake Up Learning)
Depending on the purpose of your curation, there are certain tools that may fit your needs better than others. This list has it all! Whether you are curating professional learning resources, planning a lesson, or creating something to share, there’s a tool below that can help you do it!
Kasey Bell curates a collection of curation tools. I have collected together my thoughts on various tools before, however Bell’s list goes far beyond this. I really like her point of using different tools for different purposes. I am however left wondering about the longevity of them all and their subsequent data. Take for example, the recent closure of Storify. At least in using things like Google Sheets or blogs there are options for how to save the information. I think that just as there has been a push for RSS again, I feel that there is a potential to revisit blogs and there many possibilities. For example, chris Aldrich has documented his workflow, which includes the maintenance of a modern day commonplace book.
Replied to Reducing friction by Mark Mark (mpospese.com)
What I’m doing is not exactly POSSE because status posts under 280 characters are cross-posted to Twitter as plain tweets and don’t link back here, but that’s fine by me. I don’t care if Twitter has copies of my photos and words as long as I have the originals hosted here on my blog. I downsized from two blogs to one, and now instead of tweeting, I publish status posts to my blog (which get cross-posted to Twitter). I mostly use micro.blog’s iOS app for status posts, but any WordPress-compatible client would work.
Interestingly, I actually went from one to two in my transition to the Indieweb. I wanted to leave my main blog, Read Write Respond, for my longer posts, while I use Read Write Collect for everything else. I must admit that I am progressively consolidating more and more of my disparate parts.

I am intrigued by the idea of relying on micro.blogs to manage comments. Treating it like that reminds me a little of Disqus.

Why Teachers And Students Should Blog: 18 Benefits of Educational Blogging

Kathleen Morris summarises a range of benefits associated with student blogging. This is a useful provocation. My only question is the potential of developing a social media space. Maybe this is covered by the idea of an ‘online hub’.

Replied to Radio #EDUtalk 07-03-2018 Loose Learners Ep 9 The State of Blogging by John Johnston (EDUtalk)
This episode explores a favourite topic for both John and Mariana – blogging. It explores the current state of things.

Thank you John for the mention. The blogger who I think you were trying to remember is Bill Ferriter. He wrote an interesting post reflecting on the myth of audience.

I sometimes wonder if people like Dave Winer and Alan Levine are the real ‘Big B Bloggers’. This is not because they curate a platform for financial purposes, which they don’t, but because they each in their own ways take blogging to the extremes of what is possible. I consider their pursuit as both cognitive and technical. I think that Micro.blog and #IndieWeb communities capture this too. This is the Big B blogging that I am interested in.

Bookmarked Small b blogging (tomcritchlow.com)
Small b blogging is learning to write and think with the network. Small b blogging is writing content designed for small deliberate audiences and showing it to them. Small b blogging is deliberately chasing interesting ideas over pageviews and scale. An attempt at genuine connection vs the gloss and polish and mass market of most “content marketing”. And remember that you are your own audience! Small b blogging is writing things that you link back to and reference time and time again. Ideas that can evolve and grow as your thinking and audience grows.
Tom Critchlow provides a case for network blogging where your focus is on a particular audience:

So I challenge you to think clearly about the many disparate networks you’re part of and think about the ideas you might want to offer those networks that you don’t want to get lost in the feed. Ideas you might want to return to. Think about how writing with and for the network might enable you to start blogging. Forget the big B blogging model. Forget Medium’s promise of page views and claps. Forget the guest post on Inc, Forbes and Entrepreneur. Forget Fast Company. Forget fast content.

This stands in contrast to the idea or argument that blogging is first and fore mostly personal.


via Doug Belshaw

Listened This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition by Marty McGuire from martymcgui.re
This Week in the IndieWeb Audio Edition is a weekly audio summary of This Week in the IndieWeb,a digest of activities of the IndieWeb community.
Just as with the Domain of One’s Own, the #IndieWeb is as much a mindset, an approach to a more open and democratic web, as it is about the tools. Marty McGuire’s weekly take on the IndieWeb News is a great way to stay abreast of this evolving space. A regular mix of interviews, events, posts and wiki updates is a great place to capture ideas and be inspired. McGuire also provides captions to support the audio.
Replied to Writing to connect: knowing the “other” outside time & space (Reflecting Allowed)
Writing across each other’s blogs, I love how in some MOOCs, when people are focused on the same topic, one writes a post connecting ideas from multiple other posts, taking the ideas further, grabbing comments from elsewhere, and making something new, then recycling the ideas again. It’s a kind of “distributed” collaborative writing.
This is an intriguing reflection Maha. I like your points about writing across blogs, as well as connecting beyond ourselves. The one question I was left wondering is whether you would right the same post now? I too have written myself about the benefits of connected education. With both posts written a few years ago, I wonder if anything has changed? Would you still have the same outlook?
Bookmarked Different Approaches To Using Student Blogs And Digital Portfolios by Kathleen Morris (The Edublogger)
I have observed differences in how student blogs work in a variety of areas. There appears to be a spectrum in at least six key areas
Kathleen Morris provides a series of steps to follow when setting up blogs in the classroom. She also created a graphic to capture this:

Having said this, she is also mindful that every school has its own context and exists at a different point on the continuum of six aspects: duration, privacy, content, reflection, quality and control.