Bookmarked A Provocation for the Open Pedagogy Community (Hapgood)
All my former university hosted sites are gone. We built up a WPMU instance at Keene in 2010, and the lack of broad adoption meant when I left in 2013 we shut it down. I ran some wiki on university servers here and at Keene, and those are gone too. All my self-hosted sites are corrupted from hacks or transfer errors in imports. Go back into this blog and you’ll find sparse posting schedule for some years between 2010 and 2012 and it’s because those posts got nuked in a 2012 hack. I had to go out to the Wayback Machine and reconstruct the important ones by hand.
Responding to Dave Winer’s news that Harvard are closing down blogs.harvard.edu, the first academic blog hosting space, Mike Caulfield wonders about the temporal nature of institutional and self hosting. He discusses the multitude of sites that have now disappeared as they were either closed or corrupted. This is something he has discussed before. It makes me wonder whether things are any different now? It also makes me wonder about the Domain of One’s Own project and the IndieWeb, what happens when we move out of our homes? What does it mean to have a canonical link or keep a digital commonplace book?
Replied to My Class: Student Blogging Made Easy! by Kathleen Morris (The Edublogger)
My Class has had an update! Our management tool is ideal for teachers with students who either have their own student blog or publish posts on the class blog. This post explains all the features of My Class and how to use it.
I love My Class in Edublogs and feel that it is often overlooked in light of other platforms, such as SeeSaw.

Is the addition of email-less accounts in line with GDPR? I remember discovering the hack to be able to create accounts using ‘+text’ on the end of a Google account. The only issue is that this can sometimes contriven the local policy in place.

For example, Global2 requires students to sign up with their school email.

Originally published on Read Write Collect

Replied to Is Blogging Dead? by Anne Mirtschin (On an e-Journey with Generation Y)
Blogging is not dead and will not be while I and many others teach Digital Technologies! I am as passionate as ever about blogging and want my students to be too!
Blogging may not be dead, but it is not the same as it was? Whether it be the community, the comments or the platforms. Do you disagree?

Originally published at Read Write Collect

Liked Back to the Blog (Dan Cohen)
It is psychological gravity, not technical inertia, however, that is the bigger antagonist of the open web. Human beings are social animals and centralized social media like Twitter and Facebook provide a powerful sense of ambient humanity—that feeling that “others are here”—that is often missing when one writes on one’s own site. Facebook has a whole team of Ph.D.s in social psychology finding ways to increase that feeling of ambient humanity and thus increase your usage of their service.
Replied to #EDU522 Launch Videos and Updates: Join an #IndieWeb Blogging 101 Course by Greg McVerryGreg McVerry (jgregorymcverry.com)
The time has arrived and a new breed of educational bloggers will emerge from the ashes of the #EDU522. Having a focus on learning, open pedagogy, and the #indieweb as educators we will spend the next three weeks understanding how to teach with digital tools by trying out new digital tools.
I love what you are putting together here Greg. I am reminded of #walkmyworld work, as well as the Rhizo MOOCS.

Not sure how much I will be contributing, but will definitely be dipping in and out where I can.

Listened 001: Hello World! from Reclaim Today

In this inaugural episode of Reclaim Today we go full meta and discuss why we're starting this and what we hope to get out of it.

Enjoyed listening to the first episode, even if there is shame associated with podcasts. Even worse, I came upon it via Tim Owens’ post and used Huffduffer to capture it.
Replied to How Do You Find New/Interesting Blogs? by Kicks CondorKicks Condor (kickscondor.com)
Mostly, similar to what coldbrain has said, I find blogs when they are casually mentioned on a blog or comment somewhere. Stuff like blogrolls and directories and such just don’t seem to exist.
I have always found the traditional ‘list’ blogroll as limited and cumbersome. That is why I developed my own template. When I find a new author I add it to my spreadsheet.

I like this in part, but also find the workflow a little annoying. I wish it were more integrated with my site. That is what interests me about Chris Aldrich’s work.

Bookmarked Blog Case Study: Student Run Newspaper by Kathleen Morris (The Edublogger)
A student run newspaper is one type of blog that can offer many advantages for students. This post showcases an impressive newspaper run by the students at Zurich International School in Switzerland (ZIS).
The Lion’s Journal is another example of a collaborative production to add to the many faces of blogging.