Liked 25 Years of EdTech – 2003: Blogs by mweller (blog.edtechie.net)
If I had a desert island EdTech, it would be blogging, and that is not just in a nostalgic sense. No other educational technology has continued to develop, as the proliferation of WordPress sites attests, and also remain so full of potential. I’ve waxed lyrical about academic blogging many times before, but for almost every ed tech that comes along, I find myself thinking that a blog version would be better: e-portfolios, VLEs, MOOCs, OERs, social networks.
Liked Why It's Important To Bring Blogging Back Now More Than Ever (Anouska)
It’s time to bring the blogs BACK. If you like the content you see from bloggers, take the time to check out their blog. If you have a blog, don’t be discouraged. Keep writing. Keep creating. Because at the end of the day, Instagram is only a social media platform. It will be replaced by the next big thing. But as long as you look after your little corner of the internet, no app can take that away from you.
Replied to Time to get back into this blogging thing (My Thoughts...)
I realised the other day that I haven’t blogged for some time and started to reflect on why this journey of sharing my learning and my thoughts began. A number of years back I encountered som…
Great to have you back in the blogosphere Donelle. Not sure we ever stop learning about this blogging thing. Leaving the classroom has been interesting in regards to writing and reflecting. However, I always love learning so there is always something.
Bookmarked 9 Reasons Nobody Pays Attention to Your Content (You Need to Hear This) (Inc.com)
Just because you're putting images on Instagram doesn't mean they're any good. It's not about just doing. It's about doing with purpose. So, here are some things to think about as you continue building your brand online--and why people might not be paying attention to you in the first place.
Although I have questions about personal ‘branding’, there were a few useful points. However I also think that questions of message and value can be in the eye of the beholder. In part this returns to some of Bill Ferriter’s concerns associated with audiences.
Liked BloggerCon: The Rule of Links by Dave Winer (bloggercon.scripting.com)
The Rule of Links is that you link when it's appropriate to do so. Linking is an art. It's a choice. You don't link from every word or even every noun, or from the subject of every sentence. But when a reader reasonably would want to know more about the subject, the Rule of Links says you should link to it.
Replied to The Edublogger’s Guide To Podcasting by Kathleen Morris (The Edublogger)
This guide helps teachers and students learn how to consume and create their own podcasts.
This is a thorough guide Kathleen. I think that podcasts offer so much potential. I have written before about creating podcasts with Edublogs, as well as collected together a number of resources and reflections.

One of the challenges I have faced of late is creating using a Chromebook. I love Audacity, but this is not an option. I wonder if the addition of Android apps will alleviate this. Interestingly, it is easier to edit video on a Chromebook, than audio.

A development that I have engaged lately is the idea of microcasts. I think that as a model, it offers a different entry point. In some ways Flipgrid captures some of this.

Another useful tool is Jon Udell’s work around clipping video and audio. This then allows you to embed snippets, therefore offering yet another entry point.

Bookmarked 16 Curation Tools for Teachers and Students by Kasey Bell (Shake Up Learning)
Depending on the purpose of your curation, there are certain tools that may fit your needs better than others. This list has it all! Whether you are curating professional learning resources, planning a lesson, or creating something to share, there’s a tool below that can help you do it!
Kasey Bell curates a collection of curation tools. I have collected together my thoughts on various tools before, however Bell’s list goes far beyond this. I really like her point of using different tools for different purposes. I am however left wondering about the longevity of them all and their subsequent data. Take for example, the recent closure of Storify. At least in using things like Google Sheets or blogs there are options for how to save the information. I think that just as there has been a push for RSS again, I feel that there is a potential to revisit blogs and there many possibilities. For example, chris Aldrich has documented his workflow, which includes the maintenance of a modern day commonplace book.
Replied to Reducing friction by Mark Mark (mpospese.com)
What I’m doing is not exactly POSSE because status posts under 280 characters are cross-posted to Twitter as plain tweets and don’t link back here, but that’s fine by me. I don’t care if Twitter has copies of my photos and words as long as I have the originals hosted here on my blog. I downsized from two blogs to one, and now instead of tweeting, I publish status posts to my blog (which get cross-posted to Twitter). I mostly use micro.blog’s iOS app for status posts, but any WordPress-compatible client would work.
Interestingly, I actually went from one to two in my transition to the Indieweb. I wanted to leave my main blog, Read Write Respond, for my longer posts, while I use Read Write Collect for everything else. I must admit that I am progressively consolidating more and more of my disparate parts.

I am intrigued by the idea of relying on micro.blogs to manage comments. Treating it like that reminds me a little of Disqus.

Why Teachers And Students Should Blog: 18 Benefits of Educational Blogging

Kathleen Morris summarises a range of benefits associated with student blogging. This is a useful provocation. My only question is the potential of developing a social media space. Maybe this is covered by the idea of an ‘online hub’.