Liked Bad news: there's no solution to false information online by Ben WerdmüllerBen Werdmüller (Ben Werdmüller)
Imagine, instead, if I could highlight a stated fact I disagree with in an article, and annotate it by linking that exact segment from my website, from a post on a social network, from an annotations platform, or from a dedicated rating site like Tribeworthy. As a first step, it could be enough to link to the page as a whole. Browsers could then find backlinks to that segment or page and help me understand the conversation around it from everywhere on the web. There's no censoring body, and decentralized technologies work well enough today that we wouldn't need to trust any single company to host all of these backlinks. Each browser could then use its own algorithms to figure out which backlinks to display and how best to make sense of the information, making space for them to find a competitive advantage around providing context.
Bookmarked Building an Instant Life Plan and telling your personal story by Ben WerdmüllerBen Werdmüller (Ben Werdmüller)
I think humans are meant to freestyle; living by too many sets of rules closes you off to new possibilities. Conversely, having guiding principles, and treating them as a kind of living document, could be helpful.
Ben Werdmüller dive into digital identity and storytelling. He provides a series of quick prompts to help with the process.

Hi! I’m [halfsheet Post-It]

I believe the world is [no more than three regular Post-Its]

I make money by [halfsheet Post-It]

My employers are [no more than three halfsheet Post-Its]

My key work skills are [no more than three regular Post-Its]

My key personal attributes are [no more than three regular Post-Its]

My key lifestyle risks are [three regular Post-Its]

My key work risks are [three regular Post-Its]

Risks parking lot

Above all, to be successful, I need to [three regular Post-Its]

My key next steps are [three regular Post-Its]

This continues on from a past post reimagining the traditional resume, instead focusing on what you are proud of.

I wish there was a place where I could read the story of a person. Everybody’s journey is so different and beautiful; each one leads to who we are. It would be the anti-LinkedIn. And because you wouldn’t “engage with brands”, it would be the anti-Facebook, too. Instead, it would be a record of the beauty and diversity of humanity, and a thing to point to when someone asks, “who are you?”

I am also reminded of Doug Belshaw’s thoughts on emojis, identity and trust.

Replied to I’m done with syndication. Let’s help people be themselves on the web. by Ben WerdmüllerBen Werdmüller (Ben Werdmüller)
POSSE requires participation from the networks. I think it might be more effective to move all the value away: publish on your own site, and use independent readers like Woodwind or Newsblur to consume content. Forget using social networks as the conduit. Let’s go full indie.
Ben, ever since taking the dive into the #IndieWeb, I have wondered what a ‘full indie’ experience might look like. When I think of McLuhan’s ‘Law of Media’ I think #IndieWeb:

  • AMPLIFIES: control of content
  • REVERSES: ease of use
  • REVIVES: community and connections from the early blogging days
  • ELIMINATES: dependency of platforms capitalism

I must admit that I am yet to dig into things like Woodwind or Aaron Parecki’s IndieWeb Reader. Personally, if people cannot be bothered following my blog, I have a monthly newsletter which summarises various links and posts. I also like Adam Procter’s initiative of a weekly summary you can subscribe to.

I guess the question is what steps need to occur for a ‘full indieweb’ experience? Process? Applications?

Bookmarked Personality Tests and the Downfall of Democracy by Ben Werdmuller (word.weid.io)
Facebook has been designed to be an information-gathering engine in order to more effectively sell personalized advertising. Its algorithm also attempts to deeply understand your interests in order to “optimize for engagement”: keep you using the site, and therefore viewing those personalized ads, for as long as possible. Its users access Facebook for 50 minutes a day. In order to gather the most information it can, Facebook has been engineered to be the world’s most efficient peer pressure engine. Users on the platform are constantly being persuaded to stay; those who try and leave report being relentlessly emailed with personalized, emotional content to try and get them to come back.
Werdmuller explains how the use of personality quizzes can be and have been used by Facebook to develop a complex profile. In light of the Facebook breach and concerns around Cambridge Analytica, Werdmuller explains that none of this should surprise anyone. It is how the platform has been designed.

Tantek Çelik explains this in the IndieWeb Chat:

The big reveal (IMO) of the FB/CA disclosures is that nothing you post to FB is actually “private”, in practice it is silently shared with random apps (that you happen to use your FB ID to sign into), which then are sharing it with other orgs via acquisition or just outright selling your data.