Liked When Every App Crashes (Anil Dash)

we have to demand of our technology what we have of our food, clothing, medicine and other essential needs: visibility into how they’re supplied & sourced, understanding the workers & working conditions that shape them, and accountability when the system has failures. When the supply chain for Tylenol was vulnerable, the manufacturer addressed the issue directly. When consumers wanted to know their tuna was dolphin-safe, companies responded.

That raises a few key questions: Who makes your apps? Where are they sourced? Which apps do you use that were made by people you trust?

Replied to Social distancing? Moog and Korg have made their synth apps free to keep you occupied (Resident Advisor)

The iOS versions of the Minimoog Model D and the Korg Kaossilator can now be downloaded free of charge.

This is fantastic. I think I could get lost in both of these apps for hours.
Replied to Freshen Up Your Trello Workflows With These 7 New Features (blog.trello.com)

Many people have the same card or similar cards across multiple Trello boards that they work with, and it can be a pain to keep them all consistent. We’re pleased to report that one of our Power-Up partners has created the ability to mirror Trello cards!

I really like the idea of mirroring cards across boards. I think that has been one of my biggest bugbears with Trello.
Liked The Toca Boca Story – The Startup – Medium by Danielle Newnham (Medium)

So, our research and strategy has helped a lot and has actually created a great environment for our staff because they bought into the business from the beginning. We have created a confined space in our business with very strict parameters. The business is digital toys; it’s not winning, no losing, no stress, no high scores, no rules. It’s open-ended, focusing on creativity; playful, fun experiences. You have to buy into all of these things before you start here.

We do open-ended children’s apps that don’t have any rules, so you have to focus on the fun. If you start at the company and you know that, then it’s completely free because we don’t go to staff and tell them to make it a different color. As long as you buy into the initial constraints, it’s free. In fact, I have designers who say they have never worked somewhere where they have been given so much freedom, which is ironic considering that we have limited down the market so much. But it is very free for them as long as you buy into the idea — and I think that is a result of strategy. It also creates a good work environment because, quite frankly, if I think I could design better than the designer, then I have probably hired the wrong person. If I can’t bet on the designer to know best, then something is wrong.