Replied to Enabling two way communication with WordPress and GitHub for Issues by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
This week, using the magic of open web standards, I was able to write an issue post on my own website, automatically syndicate a copy of it to GitHub, and later automatically receive a reply to the copy on GitHub back to my original post as a comment there. This gives my personal website a means of ...
Chris I love the methodical approach you provide here. As I read it allows me to easily identify what I have already done or still need to do. My only hiccup is Bridgy Publish.

Everything that I have read seems to state that this is easy or seemingly obvious. I registered with Bridgy years ago. I then had issues attaching accounts to Bridgy Publish.

I probobly should document this properly. Always thought that it was me, so turned to other plugins, such as IndieWeb and SNAP.

Liked Pedagogy, Not Outcomes – How to Do Maker Models for Language Arts by dave dave (davecormier.com)
But the journey of maker into language arts isn’t just a matter of finding time in the day. It makes sense because of narrative. So much of the creative is about coming up with a narrative for what you’re doing. Whether that’s just the name of the thing that has evolved out of your creative process or a whole story about it. The communication. The writing. The collaboration. The reflection. These are key skills that are needed for citizenship. Team that up with some coding and some maker skills and you’ve got a killer combination.
Liked Supporting Digital Practice – making time-for-learning by Dave CormierDave Cormier (davecormier.com)
‘Digital Practices’ are the things that I do that are born out of the affordances of our digital communications platforms. It is an assemblage of the digital skills i might have mediated through the digital literacy and habits that i have acquired. Or, to put it more simply, it’s ‘being digital’.
Bookmarked 3 Simple Ways to Differentiate Instruction in Any Class (A.J. JULIANI)
Differentiation definitely makes sense, but again the question is HOW to do it in a class of 27 students.
AJ Juliani shares three strategies to support differentiation:

  • Assess the Process, Not the Product
  • Flip the Lecture, Flexible Groups the Following Day
  • Pick-Your-Station Activity
Bookmarked metrics, thy name is vanity (jarche.com)
About a year ago I deleted Google Analytics from this website. I no longer know where visitors come from, what they find interesting, or what they click on. This has liberated my thinking and I believe has made my writing a bit better. I always wrote for myself but I would regularly peak at my statistics. Was my viewership going up? What did people read? How did they get there? What search terms were people using? — Who cares? There are a lot of numbers that ‘social media experts’ will tell you to maximize. But there are few that make any difference.
Harold Jarche reflects on turning Google Analytics off. He instead suggests that the metric that matters (for him) is how many books he sells and how many people sign upmto his courses. He gives the example of a course that had hundreds of likes and reposts, yet only one person signed up. This has me thinking about which metric matters to me and the way in which I engage with other people’s ideas and projects. This is particularly pertinent to my focus on intent.
Liked Bernard Zuel (Bernard Zuel | Music Journalist)
Music journalist-at-large - blog, reviews & other media.
I came across this great site from Bernard Zuel sharing a range of interviews and reviews associated with music. My question though is why Wix? I really want someone to explain to me the appeal? I cannot read the content within my readers, instead pushed to the actual site. However, the reading experience there is poor. I respect the supposed simplicity, however I am left feeling that what Wix returns is not worth the compromise.
Listened Depth of Field by Sarah Blasko

I remember when I first came upon Sarah Blasko. It was a cover of Crowded House’s Don’t Dream It’s Over for the compilation She Will Have Her Way:

One of the things that struck me was the way that she cut things back to basics. Although her work often includes rich arrangements, this never seems over done. Her latest album is no different.

Although her use of synth bass and programmed beats leads to comparisons with artists like Goldfrapp, it never seems to reach the same dancefloor intensity. This mix often creates a feeling of fragility throughout the album. I was reminded in part of my experience listening to LCD Soundsystem’s album american dreams. The more I listened, the more the choice to hold back on elements made sense. I found that it is one of those albums that never seems settled and subsequently hooks you in because of it.

Read Gregory Alekseenko for a track by track breakdown.