Bookmarked The ones who disappear (austinkleon.com)
“I chose not to take the standard options in my business – going to Vegas and singing your great hits, if you’re lucky, or going to hell, which is where Elvis went,” Lennon said. “Walking away is much harder than carrying on.”
Austin Kleon collects together a number of perspectives on the challenges of walking away and finding balance. Kleon discusses the choices of Rick Moranis and John Lennon’s choices to stay at home with children.

This seems in contrast to those like Robyn Williams whose lives are deeply connected to their art. As Cherri Minns describes:

If he wasn’t working, he was a shell of himself. And when he worked, it was like a light bulb was turned on.

Replied to Stop dreaming, Australia: Google is staying in Sydney by John McDuling (The Sydney Morning Herald)
Amazon, for example, is currently auditioning 20 US cities to be the location for its second headquarters in North America. Those shortlisted include "rust-belt" cities such as Pittsburgh, Indianapolis and Columbus, Ohio (although two decidedly 'global' cities, New York and Washington DC, are the firm favourites to prevail). The reaction from Australian cities to whispers that Google could leave Sydney suggests the search giant could have conducted a similar bake-off in Australia if it wanted to.
Maybe Google could move to Federation Square in Melbourne? It would seem that is a space for sale.
Bookmarked Programming with Scratch – An educator guide. (ReconfigurED.)
Scratch is a graphical programming language and online community where users can program and share interactive media such as stories, games and animations. Whilst it is targeted at 8 to 16 year olds, anyone of any age can write a program in Scratch.
Anthony Speranza provides a useful introduction to Scratch. An often underrated application, Scratch provides an insight into some of the ways that the web works, particularly in regards to ‘blocks’. Sometimes it feels as if you are not really coding unless you are working with some form of language. The problem is that this is not how the world works. More often than not it is about building on the ideas (and snippets) of others. Look at WordPress’ move to Gutenberg. In addition to this, we interact with ‘blocks’ each and everyday in the applications and sites that we use. One only needs to use something like Mozilla’s X-Ray Goggles to start realising that inherent complexity within the web.
Liked I believe in the IndieWeb. It needs to believe in itself
Webmention, like most every IndieWeb technology, hides its light under a bushel of deep obscurity. I discovered IndieWeb three months ago by happenstance, and since then exactly zero of my fellow web-working professionals with whom I’ve brought up the subject had heard of it before that moment. On the one hand, I find this truly fascinating: here is a geographically diverse group of deeply caring technologists who have not just invented but, over most of a decade, refined and iterated tools for a truly democratized web. They have developed them to a point where the web’s core standards body has recognized their merit, and — more to the point — where a jaded lifelong web-engineer like me can so much as glance at them and immediately feel amazed by their coiled-spring potential, suddenly hungry to start working with them myself.
Replied to Gonski 2.0: Promoting a deficit view of Australian teachers (the édu flâneuse)
Of course we can and should improve Australian education. Of course we should have high expectations of students and educators. Of course we should develop our knowledge of effective teaching, learning and leading. Of course we should continue to develop our engagement with research and evidence. But Australian education is not a factory model of mass education production. It is not a calamitous problem to be solved, a bunch of broken individuals to be fixed, or a commercial opportunity ready to be flooded by corporate solutions. Australian teachers, school leaders and schools deserve trust, respect, support and involvement in policymaking.
I am really interested in your point about rhetoric. Another interesting read on the topic of testing and improvement is National Testing in Schools. I was really struct by the influence that NAPLAN has had on the way we speak about learning and education as a whole, especially Nicole Mockler’s chapter. It feels that this report continues some of this.
Bookmarked Glenn Savage on #Gonski2 (Filling the pail)
Having taught curriculum theory for many years, my personal view is that I think we need to be careful not to get caught up in curriculum fads that do much to celebrate the notion of transcending so-called ‘siloed disciplines’ in favour of what, in reality, can often be an atmospheric assemblage of dispositions we’re apparently supposed to structure learning around. - Glenn Savage
This continues Savage’s commentary on Gonski 2.0 (see The Conversation and listen to the ABC.) He raises a number of concerns about jumping straight into implementation, arguing that we need to run a number of pilots to test some of recommendations before over-investing. He is also wary of fads and solutions.

I can tell you, I’ve worked in some of the most disadvantaged schools in the Western world and when I arrived at work in the morning, the challenges I faced weren’t poor kids with fixed mindsets. Instead, I had poor kids who hadn’t had breakfast, who were shivering because their parents couldn’t afford uniforms, or who were suffering trauma from their time in refugee camps. Mindsets had nothing to do with it.

From an ideological point-of-view, he does not think that approaching the document from only one lens offers much. Instead he offers a number of plausible interpretations to demonstrate the possibilities.