Replied to Mapping the data infrastructure of market reform in higher education (code acts in education)

As with all data infrastructure, mapping the HE data infrastructure is a complex task. In this initial attempt to document it, I am following Rob Kitchin’s call for case studies that trace out the ‘sociotechnical arrangements’ of people, organizations, policies, discourses and technologies involved in the development, evolution, influence, dead-ends and failures of data infrastructures. It is necessarily a very partial account of a much larger project to follow the development, rollout and upkeep of a new data infrastructure in UK HE, and to chart how big data, learning analytics and adaptive learning technologies are being positioned as part of this program to deliver a reformed ‘smart’ sector for the future.

Ben this is a fascinating read. I love the way that you bring all the parts of the assemblage into view. The only question that I was left wondering is the role of SIF specifications has with higher education?
Liked Thanks for the Feedback (Adrian Camm)

One of my big takeaways from Thanks for the Feedback: The Science and Art of Receiving Feedback Well is the fact that we often have multiple issues present in any feedback conversation that confuse, disorient and lead to conflict. When this occurs we need to be explicit and signpost that this is the case with a statement like, “I think that there are two topics here. Let’s discuss each topic fully, but separately, as both are important. Ok. Let’s loop back to the start and start with the first topic.”

Liked An ocean of inquiry… (Kath Murdoch)

If you are thinking ahead about your year… and the kinds of inquiries you might engage your students in, consider an inquiry into the ocean – and our connection to it – as one of your learning contexts. Resources abound. There is no shortage of experts and organisations and plenty of rock pools still left to gaze upon in wonder. If you are asking yourself : What’s worth inquiring into? You might find this video clip helps answer that question. How will your teaching contribute to the imperative to care for this precious blue planet in 2018?

Bookmarked Should Your Class Or Student Blogs Be Public Or Private? by Kathleen Morris (The Edublogger)

A dilemma that faces many educators new blogging is the question of whether they should be publishing their students’ information and work online. They might wonder if their class or student blogs should be public for anyone to see, or private for a limited audience (or no one) to view.

Kathleen Morris unpacks the benefits of both private and public blogs. She provides a number of arguments with evidence to support. This is particularly pertinent to schools and educators.

Edublogs on Private vs Public

Personally, when I supported classroom blogs they were closed as I was not comfortable that everyone who needed to be was fully aware of the consequences. I think though that Kin Lane’s advice on APIs can be applied, approach everything as if it is public even if it is not.

Bookmarked API Life Cycle Basics: Documentation (apievangelist.com)

API documentation should not be static. It should always be driven from OpenAPI, JSON Schema, and other pipeline artifacts. Documentation should be part of the CI/CD build process, and published as part of an API portal life cycle as mentioned above. API documentation should exist for ALL APIs that are deployed within an organization, and used to drive conversations across development as well as business groups–making sure the details of API design are always in as plain language as possible.

Kin Lane as the API Evangelist on the importance of documentation, this is a part of his work on API Basics
Liked Would You Like The Z Version Or The S Version? by Graham (gwegner.edublogs.org)

PersonaliSed learning for me involves student choice, students helping define the direction of the learning and students showcasing their learning in ways that are personal. Education technology’s role in this scenario is an enabler allowing the student access to information that they want, connection to resources and people that can help them in that learning and to create their own solution / product / showcase. PersonaliZed learning wants the technology to be in control, pushing or elevating the student through pre-determined content and concepts – Khan Academy without the choice is what springs into my head. Like you point out, the Z version promises what the s version has been shown to be capable of but reduces it all down to (in your words) “various modular ‘fun’ activities under the trending veneer of gamification.”

Liked What do teachers do on Twitter? Emerging findings. by IaninSheffield (Marginal Notes)

In pre-internet times, connecting with colleagues (and/or experts) having shared interests often depended on proximity. Twitter now enables those connections to become possible where once it might have been much less common.

Liked Tread Softly (Freeing the Angel)

When children are tiny, they are reliant on the gentle nurturing of adults. They need us to play with them, to give them lots of warmth and attention and love. As they grow older we can be a bit tougher on them, show them how to stand up in the world that they live in, and help them succeed. But when they are tiny we need to handle them gently. And they are only tiny for a very short while. So maybe we should all tread softly, lest we tread upon their dreams.

Bookmarked I Started the Media Men List (The Cut)

Last year, I wrote that women just recounting their experiences of sexism did not seem like enough. I wanted action, legislation, measurable markers of change. Now I think that the task at hand might be more rudimentary than I assumed: The experience of making the spreadsheet has shown me that it is still explosive, radical, and productively dangerous for women to say what we mean. But this doesn’t mean that I’ve lowered my hopes. Like a lot of feminists, I think about how women can build power, help one another, and work toward justice. But it is less common for us to examine the ways we might wield the power we already have. Among the most potent of these powers is the knowledge of our own experiences. The women who used the spreadsheet, and who spread it to others, used this power in a special way, and I’m thankful to all of them.

Moira Donegan recounts her experience of producing the anonymous Shitty Media Men Google Spreadsheet. This is a reminder of the way in which power and privilege so often outweigh the supposed potential of technology.

Via Hack Education Weekly Newsletter

Replied to Ask Me Anything (AMA) (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)
Chris, I have been investigating bookmarking lately. I noticed that you trialed Radio3 a while back. I like what it offers in regards to syndication, but was wondering if there was a way of doing the same sort of thing in WordPress? That is, post a ‘Like’ on my site, but publicise the original link? I guess I could do this manually, I was just dreaming of something a little more automated?
Bookmarked White, Male, And Convincing Myself I Am Doing Good With Technology (kinlane.com)

Technology is a trip. Web technology is a delusion-ally virtual trip. It really seems to have many of us by the balls (pun intended), and working us like a puppet. I still perform this act on a daily basis via API Evangelist. Why? Because it makes me money! Of course, I’m always working to minimize the bullshit. Something I’m continuing to do by eliminating the mission driven rhetoric, but I just can’t quit API Evangelist. I’ve assumed this persona, and can’t seem to shake it. As I keep working to understand the beast I’ve created, I will continue to tell the story here on the blog.

Kin Lane reflects on the addictive nature of technology and the way in which he has convinced himself over time that he is actually doing good. This touches on the some of the ideas around ‘automating inequality’.
Bookmarked Beyond the Rhetoric of Algorithmic Solutionism (Points)

Rather than thinking of AI as “artificial intelligence,” Eubanks effectively builds the case for how we should think that AI often means “automating inequality” in practice.

danah boyd reviews a book by Virginia Eubanks which takes a look at the way(s) that algorithms work within particular communities. Along with Weapons of Math Destruction and Williamson’s Big Data in Education, they provide a useful starting point for discussing big data today.
Bookmarked Ancient Tree Structure Is Like a Forest unto Itself (Scientific American)

Some 370 million years ago cladoxylopsid trees stood at least eight meters tall, capped by branches with twiggy appendages instead of leaves. They looked a bit like spindly palm trees. Today their scant remains reveal little about their insides; in most cases their innards had rotted before the trees fossilized, and storms had filled them with sand. But the recent find of two well-preserved fossils in China has exposed the trees’ inner workings—which are like no other species studied before.

Daisy Yuhas documents the discovery of an extinct tree with a trunk made up like laticework, a hollow core and no leaves.

via Freshly Brewed Thoughts by Laura Hilliger

Bookmarked All The Ways Your Smartphone And Its Apps Can Track You (Gizmodo Australia)

In the end your smartphone use is helping to build up a picture of who you are and the kind of advertising you’re interested in for companies like Google, Facebook, and others — even if an app isn’t part of a massive advertising network, it may well sell its data to one. Apple stands apart in this regard, keeping the data it tracks for its own use and largely on a single device, though of course the apps that run on iOS have more freedom to do what they want.

Even if you’re reasonably content to put up with some monitoring on Android and iOS, it’s important to know what kind of data you’re giving up every time you switch your smartphone on. Whether it means you uninstall a few social media tools, or disable location tracking for a few apps, it gives you some semblance of control over your privacy.

Mark Nield explains some ways that phones track users, including capturing location settings via photographs. He also provides some tips for how to regain some of the control through the privacy settings. Along with Adam Greenfield’s breakdown of the smartphone, these posts help to highlight what data is being gathered about us and how.
Replied to Replying on Micro.blog is a bit like being able to comment o… by john john (John’s World Wide Wall Display)

Replying on Micro.blog is a bit like being able to comment on someone’s site from your RSS reader. It is nice to have so many ways & places to chat.

Comment directly.

Via micro.blog.

On own site via webmentions when you want to own your thought or add it to another bubble.
Like this: Like Loading…

One of the things that I notice about Micro.Blogs in regards to your blog John
is the amount of interaction that you seem to get. This post is a prime example.

Some talk about the death of comments, but I feel that comments have changed and evolved. Now there are many things that ‘make a comment’ all tied together with webmentions.

I do wonder though in regards to Micro.Blogs whether it is about the features and affordances of the platform or if it is the community that exists there? Or are they intertwined, somehow learning from each other?

Replied to Redesigning Doug Belshaw’s Thought Shrapnel (Open Educational Thinkering)

Check out my redesigned newsletter (and blog!)

Doug, I think I may have lost count to how many blogs you are up to, let alone domains. I have ventured down a different path of having two blogs, my main site and another which collects many disparate things. In part because I was struggling to maintain so many moving parts, but also because I have dived into the IndieWeb.

Do you have any hiccups with so many sites? For example, it was my understanding that Bridgy has certain limitations. Although moving away from the silos, I guess that may not be a concern?

Looking forward to following the links, along with the newsletter.

Aaron.

Bookmarked The human solution to Facebook’s machine-produced problems also won’t work (dsearls)

The best thing for Zuck to do is get the hell out, let it finish failing, and start over with something new and better, based on what he and others have learned from the experience. (Which tends to be the best teacher. And hell, he’s still young.) It should help him—and all of us—to know that all companies fail; they just fail faster in Silicon Valley.

Doc Searls on why Facebook’s attempt to fix itself will fail and how the world has changed.
Bookmarked Good theft vs. bad theft (austinkleon.com)

Despite the common saying, imitation is not flattery. It’s transformation that is flattery: taking what you’ve stolen and turning it into something new.

Austin Kleon returns to an idea that is central to his book Steal Like an Artist. Summarising TS Eliot, Kleon suggests that the secret is not imitation, but rather transformation. This reminds me of Harold Bloom’s idea of ‘anxiety’. I also love Kleon’s closing remarks:

If you met the artist you’re stealing from in a stalled elevator, would they shake your hand or punch you in the face?

Replied to A Digital Food Diary on My Own Website (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)

Food and Drink on my own website
I’ve been wanting to do it for a while, but I’ve finally started making eat and drink posts. The display isn’t exactly what I want yet, but it’s getting there. For myself and those reading, I’ll try to continue tweaking on templates, but with the start of …

Is there a limit? Chris, I love how your site just keeps on developing. I am not sure if I am going to start adding such stories to my site, but it really gives me hope about a better web.
Replied to

Mariana, just wondering where you have stored your archived lists? I was notified of there deletion via ‘Broken Links’. I really liked your Storify on GIFs.

I am in fear if this is a start of a series of dominoes. My Tumblr posts are all POSSE’d, however I really need to think about my Flickr collection. Must admit it has really sparked me to reconsider a number of practices and processes, which is probably good.