Liked Empty half the Earth of its humans. It's the only way to save the planet | Kim Stanley Robinson by Kim Stanley Robinson (the Guardian)
The Global Footprint Network estimates that we use up our annual supply of renewable resources by August every year, after which we are cutting into non-renewable supplies – in effect stealing from future generations. Eating the seed corn, they used to call it. At the same time we’re pumping carbon dioxide into the atmosphere at a rate that is changing the climate in dangerous ways and will certainly damage agriculture.
Liked Text tradeoffs as we move from print to pixel by wiobyrne (W. Ian O'Byrne)
A broadened view of text is needed to consider the various forms and modes of text in our world. These might include text in a printed book, a street sign, a video game, a YouTube video, an animated GIF, audio podcast, etc. We can no longer look at only one form of text as “correct”, and all other forms of reading and writing as not involving true literacy practices.
Replied to Digg Shrugg by Alan LevineAlan Levine (CogDogBlog)
Born as the bastard child of Google Reader, Digg’s own spawn came into being June 26, 2013 as a ray of hope for the RSS fanatics, aiming to offer the same feature set as the dead Google parent. Digg Reader lived a placid life, not quite firmly connected with it’s parent’s products (whatever they are) but performed a yeoman’s service for the dwindling few who believed in the choice of news and information sources, rather than sucking up to the hose of some algorithm. But Digg Reader’s health was failing as many noticed the dwindling reliability and upkeep of the mobile app. It’s death was mercifully quick, it did not suffer long, yet left most wondering in its wake why it was even sick.
I totally get your point about feed readers not actually holding our information as such, I think that Inoreader takes this a step further with the ability to subscribe to feeds which can easily be stored in WordPress. Maybe there is a potential of a linksplot?
Replied to @mrkrndvs I've really been interested in the collection/curation I see from you & @chrisaldrich - I'm in the process of figuring out how to build up a WordPress site to serve as the by wiobyrnewiobyrne (Scholar Social)
@mrkrndvs I've really been interested in the collection/curation I see from you & @chrisaldrich - I'm in the process of figuring out how to build up a WordPress site to serve as the "commonplace book" on the WordPress site, keep it simple, and have it pump into my weekly newsletter. Any links/guida...
I agree with @ChrisAldrich about post kind plugins. Although I have more variants than the kinds provided, they offer a really good starting point.

Clint Lalonde Also wrote about the use of MailPoet To curate his newsletter. It doesn’t suit me at this point in time, but might suit you. Also, I think MailChimp allows you to collate via blog posts too? I assume that is what @dajbelshaw is doing with Thought Shrapnel.

Liked How Netflix works: the (hugely simplified) complex stuff that happens every time you hit Play by Mayukh Nair (Medium)
This is what happens when you hit that Play button: Hundreds of microservices, or tiny independent programs, work together to make one large Netflix service. Content legally acquired or licensed is converted into a size that fits your screen, and protected from being copied. Servers across the world make a copy of it and store it so that the closest one to you delivers it at max quality and speed. When you select a show, your Netflix app cherry picks which of these servers will it load the video from. You are now gripped by Frank Underwood’s chilling tactics, given depression by BoJack Horseman’s rollercoaster life, tickled by Dev in Master of None and made phobic to the future of technology by the stories in Black Mirror. And your lifespan decreases as your binge watching turns you into a couch potato.
In this presentation, Austin Kleon considers the question of “How to keep going” He answers this with ten points:

  1. Everyday is Groundhog Day
  2. Build a ‘bliss station’
  3. Forget the noun, follow the verb
  4. Make gifts
  5. The ordinary + extra attention = extra-ordinary
  6. Art is FOR life
  7. You’re allow to change your mind
  8. When in doubt, tidy up
  9. Demon’s hate fresh air so take a walk
  10. Spend time on something that will outlast you

I find Kleon one of those writers (and artists) who you can come back to again as a point of reflection.

Image via “Happy Little Trees” by nolnet https://flickr.com/photos/nolnet/5589665399 is licensed under CC BY-NC
Quote via Austin Kleon ‘How to Keep Going’