Liked There’s a soup of rubbish in the Pacific that’s almost as big as Queensland (ABC News)

Whether you’re focusing on count or mass, I think it is alarming and we all recognise that this is an increasing global project and it’s going to take local solutions as well as hopefully global governance to help resolve the issues

Bookmarked Google Forms: Pre-Fill an Answer by Alice Keeler (Teacher Tech)

Notice in this peer evaluation Form below that the students would enter the names of their peers and the project title. This has a high probability of messy data. As a teacher, you will want to sort and filter the peer evaluation results by each student’s project. For this, you will want each students name and project title spelled exactly the same.

This is another great example of the power of the URL. I love the possibilities of this, especially when combined with Google Sheets to provide a means of managing variables. Keeler also provides templates to work from.
Liked The Paradox of Universal Basic Income (WIRED)

Touted as an elegant solution to the problem of poverty in America and the impending decimation of jobs by automation, UBI is a hot topic today in the “salons” hosted by tech and hedge-fund billionaires. The idea of UBI in fact is an old idea, older than me even: Either through direct cash payments or some sort of negative income tax, we should support people in need—or even everyone—to increase well-being and lift society overall.

Interestingly, this notion has had broad support from conservatives like Milton Friedman and progressives such as Martin Luther King Jr. On the other hand, UBI also has been criticized by conservatives as well as liberals.

Replied to The Do’s and Don’ts of Google Slides – EdTechTeam (EdTechTeam)

A User Guide for students using Google Slides. Help your students get the most out of Google Slides as a powerful publishing and presentation tool. Easy to follow guide showcasing the features of Google Slides to promote top notch designs that help students thrive and be successful in their learning.

I have been noticing more and more that there has been a change of quality when it comes to adding images to slides. I was happy with my workflow in creating various graphics, but have found images added lately to be pixelated. Is this about the quality of the source image or Slides?
Bookmarked Cambridge Analytica Part 2: The Lessons We Need To Learn About Social Media And Propaganda – New Matilda (New Matilda)

In the second of a two part series, Michael Brull looks at the scandal that is wiping billions of dollars in value off the world’s richest company… and it’s about much more than just social media and data mining. British news program on Channel 4 has exposed Cambridge Analytica and Facebook for what has becomeMore

Michael Brull looks at the scandal that is wiping billions of dollars in value off the world’s richest company… and it’s about much more than just social media and data mining. One of the things that stood out was how we even know what we know about Cambridge Analytica:

The reason we know about Cambridge Analytica is because of some British investigative reporters posing as Sri Lankans hoping to recruit them for a campaign. That is, our information about what other organisations like Cambridge Analytica do is fragmentary. We don’t know if the Clinton campaign acted similarly. We don’t know how they affected campaigning in Australia. We don’t know if they harvested data on Australians, or sold that data to Australian politicians, or their electoral campaigns.

The reality is, there is no way of truly knowing who is spending what when the information being generated is inserted into the bloodstream of the internet.

Bookmarked The four types of online discussion. Where are you? (W. Ian O’Byrne)

The four types of discussion found online can be used to identify the general tendencies individuals have as they communicate, comment, and react in online spaces. An individual may have a series of posts and comments that spread across multiple quadrants as they socialize and participate in online spaces. Yet, wherever there is a large concentration of messages on this model, that identifies the type of communication you generally engage in.

This matrix really has me thinking, especially about different contexts online. For example, with a Twitter chats, when you have different people meeting together with different intents (dialogue vs. debate), how is it that it works? Or does it?

Replied to 🎧 ‘The Daily’: Can Facebook Be Fixed? | The New York Times by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)

I’m coming much closer to calling it quits on Facebook. I’ve outlined a plan for extracting myself and just need to begin implementation. I’ve even got a potential scalable plan for family/friends who would like to leave as well.

My Facebook account has lay dormant for a year or so. I feel that leaving would not be so hard, however I really want a workable archive. I really like what Jonathon LaCour did. Just feel that all that parsing is Generation 1 and that is not me. I wonder if this is an #IndieWeb opportunity? To develop a meaningful extraction plan that includes keeping a working archive?

I am also mindful that simply leaving is only one part of the puzzle.

Bookmarked Whose meeting is this? A simple checklist (sethgodin.typepad.com)

There’s one person responsible.

The time allocated matches what’s needed, not what the calendar app says.

Everyone invited is someone who needs to be there, and no key party is missing.

There’s a default step forward if someone doesn’t come.

There’s no better way to move this forward than to have this meeting.

The desired outcome is clearly stated. The organizer has described what would have to happen for the meeting to be cancelled or to stop midway. “This is what I want to happen,” and if there’s a “yes,” we’re done.

All relevant information, including analysis, is available to all in plenty of time to be reviewed in advance.

Seth Godin provides a set of questions to consider. I wonder how many of the meetings I have been a part of would actually tick all these, especially the last:

All relevant information, including analysis, is available to all in plenty of time to be reviewed in advance.

This is a checklist to come back to regularly.

Replied to The Edublogger’s Guide To Podcasting by Kathleen Morris (The Edublogger)

This guide helps teachers and students learn how to consume and create their own podcasts.

This is a thorough guide Kathleen. I think that podcasts offer so much potential. I have written before about creating podcasts with Edublogs, as well as collected together a number of resources and reflections.

One of the challenges I have faced of late is creating using a Chromebook. I love Audacity, but this is not an option. I wonder if the addition of Android apps will alleviate this. Interestingly, it is easier to edit video on a Chromebook, than audio.

A development that I have engaged lately is the idea of microcasts. I think that as a model, it offers a different entry point. In some ways Flipgrid captures some of this.

Another useful tool is Jon Udell’s work around clipping video and audio. This then allows you to embed snippets, therefore offering yet another entry point.

Bookmarked

Richard, I love this point:

“There is no such thing as a typical day. Every student’s day is different and no two students have the same timetable.”

I worked at a school that went with a choice based program a few years ago. The problem with it was that it was as old as I was.

Although the students had choice, it was choice over what teacher’s were willing to offer. I guess that would be the next step.

I like the work Greg Miller is doing in this area.

Replied to Freshly Brewed Thoughts: March 30, 2018 (mailchi.mp)

I’m supporting Thought Shrapnel on Patreon and I have to say, I’m inspired by Doug’s use of the platform. I updated my own Patreon page a bit and have started sharing things just for patrons.

I find this move to Patreon interesting. I have unpacked it elsewhere. I am wondering about the impact that this has on the open web? Am I allowed to share something that is for a privileged audience?
So much of the discussion around the recent scandal involving the use of sandpaper to scuff the ball has been blamed on Cameron Bancroft, Steve Smith and David Warner. This documentary takes a wider look. Painting a picture of a perfect storm, it touches on David Warner being on edge, past history involving South Africa using a lolly to shine the ball, the creation of a competitive culture that incentivised winning and one of Australia’s youngest captains when he took the reigns.
Bookmarked 16 Curation Tools for Teachers and Students (Shake Up Learning)

Depending on the purpose of your curation, there are certain tools that may fit your needs better than others. This list has it all! Whether you are curating professional learning resources, planning a lesson, or creating something to share, there’s a tool below that can help you do it!

Kasey Bell curates a collection of curation tools. I have collected together my thoughts on various tools before, however Bell’s list goes far beyond this. I really like her point of using different tools for different purposes. I am however left wondering about the longevity of them all and their subsequent data. Take for example, the recent closure of Storify. At least in using things like Google Sheets or blogs there are options for how to save the information. I think that just as there has been a push for RSS again, I feel that there is a potential to revisit blogs and there many possibilities. For example, chris Aldrich has documented his workflow, which includes the maintenance of a modern day commonplace book.
Listened Kate Bush, Radio 4 on Music – BBC Radio 4 from BBC

In November 2005, Kate Bush broke a 12 year silence with the release of her double album ‘Aerial’, In this programme she gives a very rare interview to John Wilson in a special edition of Front Row, where she talks about why the album took so long to appear and tells some of the stories behind the songs.


Kate Bush reflects on music, the influence of technology and way in which she crafts her work.

I think that it would be a shame that, amoungst all this technology, for us to lose our sense of humanity. Music is suffering greatly from the overuse of computers and taking away the human element, which art is about human expression. I think machines and technologies should be used by people, you should not be a slave to them.

This reminded me of the discussion of Nigel Godrich’s use of tape in the production of music as a part of episode two of the Soundbreaking documentary.

via Austin Kleon

📰 eLearn Update (March 2018)

Here is a collection of links and resources associated with GSuite and Hapara for March 2018.


Updates

Resources

Drive

Chrome

Research

Docs

Slides

Forms

Sheets

Sites

Classroom

Geo Tools

  • Google Maps learns 39 new languages – Google are making Google Maps even more useful by adding 39 new languages—spoken by an estimated 1.25 billion people worldwide: Afrikaans, Albanian, Amharic, Armenian, Azerbaijani, Bosnian, Burmese, Croatian, Czech, Danish, Estonian, Filipino, Finnish, Georgian, Hebrew, Icelandic, Indonesian, Kazakh, Khmer, Kyrgyz, Lao, Latvian, Lithuanian, Macedonian, Malay, Mongolian, Norwegian, Persian, Romanian, Serbian, Slovak, Slovenian, Swahili, Swedish, Turkish, Ukrainian, Uzbek, Vietnamese, and Zulu.

Connecting Classrooms

Keep

YouTube

General

Liked 5G technology may change the world, but not for a while yet (ABC News)

5G stands for “fifth generation mobile”.

It builds on the current 4G network but promises to deliver higher peak connection speeds and lower latency, or time delays.

5G’s higher connection speeds will be possible thanks to improved radio technologies, increased allocations of radio spectrum and by using many more antenna sites or base stations than today’s networks.

Each antenna will serve a smaller area, or cell.

Liked Yes, Project-Based Learning Gets Kids Ready for the Test (and so much more) (A.J. JULIANI)

I’d ask anyone who is criticizing PBL in the classroom to talk to the teachers and students who have had this opportunity. I’d ask them to look at what students are creating, making, and building during this time. I’d ask them to talk to the parents about their students’ attitude towards learning.

I give two answers to the question above:

Try it for a day and see what happens. Start small and build from there.
Teach through the project, instead of using the project as an “end-of-unit” assessment that takes more time than a multiple choice test. When kids learn during the project, the time constraint goes away.

Liked How Do We Build 21st Century Business Skills?

So this year we launched a new MBA Industry Project program at UQ.

The way we pitch it to businesses is: do you have a problem that you know is strategically important, but you don’t currently have the bandwidth within your organisation to find the best solution? If so, we will put a team of MBA on that problem for one semester to help you find the best way forward.

(And if so, and if you’re in Australia, and you’re interested, please get in touch!)

The way we pitch it to students is: if you look at that list of 21st Century capabilities, and agree that they are important, this is the best way to build them.

Replied to Issue #119 of the TL;DR Newsletter – rethinking the simple bare necessities. (mailchi.mp)

My concern is not Google, Facebook, and others that I give my data…my concern is the unseen/unknown companies that buy my data. Also, keep in mind that your biggest concern (in the U.S.) should be your Internet Service Provider (ISP). They’re sucking up your data, watching your searching/browsing habits, connecting this to your billing info, and selling/giving this off to everyone.

This is such an interesting topic Ian. I too have touched upon it in my newsletter. I agree with your point that there are bigger, dirtier parties at play within this area, I am just concerned about excluding the FANGS from the discussion.

I also wonder what ‘informed consent’ looks like in the future? I think improvements to the Terms and Conditions is only the beginning. It has me returning to Doug Belshaw’s elements:


“The 8 Essential Elements of Digital Literacies #digilit” by mrkrndvs is licensed under CC BY-SA

To be ‘informed’ surely is about having a deeper understanding of the way that technology and literacies work?