Replied to Vulnerability by Corrie (cbarclay.global2.vic.edu.au)
Empathy is about feeling with people and understanding with emotion the plight they may be in. It takes a true human connection to be made for empathy to be real and genuine. It is that empathetic connection that makes the feeling of being vulnerable better.
Nice post to start back on Corrie. Whether it be restorative practice or positive education, the emotional side seems to something we are addressing more and more today. I wrote about emotions and coaching last year. One of my concerns with this area is that it becomes another thing to typecast students (and teachers) with. See for example PISA’s move into pyschometric testing.
Replied to How to Win an Argument Every Time, Why You Should Not, & What it Means for Education by Bernard Bull (Etale)
it is not good to win arguments every time. As much as I value the article and the infographic, and as much as I took a little time to track down the context for the infographic, the title focuses our attention on trying to win the argument every time. I disagree, and not just in situations where we recognize that we are wrong. Sometimes we are completely convinced that we are right, but we are not. To win would take us and others further away from the objective truth or the wisest course of action. I contend that the pursuit of such an approach, while we will never do it fully or perfectly, is an important part of civil discourse, the cultivation of wisdom, much needed leadership, and actual progress. If truth matters and we value wisdom in the modern world, then skill in rhetoric must always be paired with humility and a love for that which is wise, true, beautiful, and good.
This is a useful post Bernard. It reminds me of a post I wrote a few years ago on the dangers of tribes and evolving the conversation. It feels as if social media pushes us to these extremes at times, rather than the grey space.

Coming from a Literature background, so often things are structured are power and persuasion. I feel if I had (or have) my time again how I might bring some more nuanced conversations in the classroom. I think that the Visible Learning routines can be helpful in developing this.

Liked How Do You Invest Your Most Valuable Asset – Your Attention? by Tim Kastelle (The Discipline of Innovation)
We make choices about how we invest attention constantly, and, mostly, unconsciously. There’s value in thinking about this more consciously. And I’m not talking about efficiency. This isn’t about making more efficient use of time. It’s about making our investments more purpose-driven.
Liked Every User a Neo | Linux Journal (linuxjournal.com)
We can't be in control of our lives as long as those lives are contained by platforms and we lack the tools for mastery over our virtual bodies and minds online. It doesn't matter if Facebook, Google and the rest have no malicious intent, or if they really do want to "bring the world closer together", or to "organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful" or to "develop services that significantly improve the lives of as many people as possible". We need to be free and independent agents of our selves.
Bookmarked Behind the Revolutionary Power of Black Panther (TIME.com)
The revolutionary thing about Black Panther is that it envisions a world not devoid of racism but one in which black people have the wealth, technology and military might to level the playing field—a scenario applicable not only to the predominantly white landscape of Hollywood but, more important, to the world at large.
This piece captures some of the hope and hype associatwd with the new Black Panther film. It also provides a discussion of the original Black Panther movement. Along with this post from the BBC, they explain why the movie is so important right now in a step to give voice back to a marginalised voice within society. As Austin Collins explains in The Ringer:

How much better would most superhero movies be if, rather than fall back on the plain anonymity of World War I and II villains, they rooted themselves in a live, urgent sense of culture? What if Christopher Nolan’s Batman films had anchored themselves in a genuine sense of economic disparity, rather than continually paying lip service to that idea through a vaguely conceived millionaire and his abuses of power? What if the Avengers’ Ultron had more of a palpable fear of public surveillance? Seeing Bruce Wayne or even 007 get a tour of their new toys, meanwhile, is always fun, as tropes go, but imagine that those toys, and the monied, technologically advanced societies they imply, had become possible only through an element that had the power to reverse the course of colonial history. Wouldn’t those tools seem more powerful, the stakes in their design that much higher? That’s what it feels like to watch Black Panther.

Replied to Teaching Critical Thinking? These Mythbusters Activities Will Help by Bill Ferriter (The Tempered Radical)
Our goal is to help students recognize that gaps in thinking aren’t something to be afraid of.  They are something to be openly acknowledged and then addressed through deliberate attempts to gather more information.
Bill this is fantastic idea. I like the use of a graphic organiser to scaffold the thinking. It reminds me of the Zoom In routine, where it is impossible to ‘know’ what the image is, therefore forcing student to justify their interpretations.
Bookmarked Eight steps to write a literature review (W. Ian O'Byrne)
A literature review is not an annotated bibliography. An annotated bibliography is a document in which you briefly summarize briefly each article that you have reviewed. The literature review does contain a summary of your research, but it goes beyond the typical annotated bibliography by focusing on a specific topic of interest and includes a critical analysis of the relationship among different works, and relating this research to your work.
Ian O’Byrne summarises eight points to work through in thinking about literature review:

  • Define a topic and audience
  • Iteratively search and re-search the literature
  • Take notes as you read
  • Consider the type of review you’re writing
  • Keep your review focused, but also broad
  • Think critically and be consistent
  • Develop a logical structure to your argument
  • Use critical feedback as your guide

I never knew that literature reviews were so nuanced. Along with his post on annotated bibliographies, these resources are those to save for a later time.

Replied to Find a Doorway That Fits Us Both by Tom Barrett (The Curious Creative)
As King suggests the first line is an invitation. As a teacher this might be the first interaction in a school day, or the opening activity of a period of learning. Crucial moments to draw learners in and engage their curiosity.
I think that this counts for blogs as well. With the statistics suggesting that people rarely read beyond the first few lines, it is important to make it count. For the last year I have been starting each post with an ‘excerpt’ that hopefully helps readers know if it is of interest.
Liked The remarkable privilege of being a male politician by Julia Baird (The Sydney Morning Herald)
Yes, it's complicated and ugly and dirty and no one wants regular updates about the sordid behaviour of our elected representatives, who are, after all imperfect like the rest of us. But I smell a rat. Could it be that when a prominent bloke strays it's a cliche, and when a woman does it, it's time to grab some popcorn?