danah boyd discusses concerns about the weaponising of media literacy through denalism and says that there is a need for cognitive strengthening. This includes:

  1. “Actively taking things out of context can be helpful for analysis”
  2. “help students truly appreciate epistemological differences”
  3. “help students see how they fill in gaps when the information presented to them is sparse and how hard it is to overcome priors [confirmation bias and selective attention]”

Benjamin Doxtdator raises the concern that focusing on the individual:

Would boyd’s cognitive strength training exercises have helped here? No. Turning inwards to psychology, rather outwards to the political context, is precisely what gives us ‘lone wolf’ analyses of white supremacy.

Instead Doxtdator suggests considering the technical infrastructure. Interestingly, she does touch on platforms in the Q&A at the end:

One of the things that is funny is that these technologies get designed for a very particular idea of what they could be used for and then they twist in different ways.source

The original text that the keynote was based on can be found here, while a response to some of the criticism can be found here.

A comment made in the Q & A after boyd's keynote
Image via “Lego on Facebook” by amarois https://flickr.com/photos/amarois/6731246141 is licensed under CC BY-NC-SA
Quote via danah boyd
Along with Alexandra Samuel’s work and Doug Belshaw’s reflection. this webinar featuring Anya Kamenetz poses a number of considerations in regards to parenting in a digital age.

Move No. 1: “Here are some scary things that can happen with too much screen time — obesity sleep issues…behavioral issues, issues around the kid’s relationship to the media that they’re using … If you’re seeing any of that, then whatever you’re doing, you should do less,” she said.

Move No. 2: “You do need a system for what the rules are going to be that is clear and communicated to your kid. And, you can do it based on time, but you can also do it based on occasion, and/or priority. … Cut back if you need to cut back, make a system, and then, think about shifting toward the positive. What is it that our kids love about the time they’re spending online. How can you build on that? How can you stretch it toward other interesting uses? So that’s the enjoy part. I think it’s fairly simple. It’s a formula for making decisions. It’s a rubric. It’s not a rule,” Kamenetz added.

Bret Victor reimagines the makerspace built around tinkering and argues that it is in ‘seeing’ that we are able to make this a science. He talks about three forms of seeing:

  • seeing inside the object being made
  • seeing across time to observe the various changes
  • seeing across possibilities to assess which is best solution based on data and reason

Victor elaborates on his idea here, including various sketches. Interestingly, this reminds me of John Hattie’s idea of the Visible Classrooms, where everything is recorded and analysed. This also sounds similar to AltSchool.


Jim Groom pointed out that this is roadmap for Victor’s Dynamicland project.

On the 8th of December at The Overseas Passenger Terminal in Sydney Australia, BVN hosted its bi-annual conference – Futures Forum 2. The theme was ‘Knowledge and Ethics in the Next Machine Age’.

23:21 Larry Prusak: Knowledge and it’s Practices in the 21st Century

Prusak discusses the changes in knowledge over time and the impact that this has. This reminds me of Weinberger’s book Too Big To Know. Some quotes that stood out were:

Knowledge won’t flow without trust

and

Schools measure things they can measure even if it is not valuable

Again and again Prusak talks about going wide, getting out and meeting new people.

1:21:59 Professor Genevieve Bell: Being Human in a Digital Age

Bell points out that computing has become about the creation, circulation, curation and resistence of data. All companies are data companies now. For example, Westfield used to be a real estate company, but they are now a data company.

The problem with algorithms is that they are based on the familiar and retrospective, they do not account for wonder and serendipity.

As we design and develop standards for tomorrow, we need to think about the diversity associated with those boards and committees. If there are only white males at the table, how does this account for other perspectives.

We do want to be disconnected, even if Silicon Valley is built around being permanently connected. One of the things that we need to consider is what is means to have an analogue footprint.

Building on the discussion of data and trust, Bell makes the point:

The thing about trust is that you only get it once.

The question remains, who do we trust when our smart devices start selling our data.

In regards to the rise of the robots, our concern should be the artificial intelligence within them. One of the big problems is that robots follow rules and we don’t.

The future of technology that we need to be aspiring to develop a future where technology can support us with our art, wonder and curiosity.


A comment made during the presentation and shared after Bell had finished:

Is your current job the best place for you to make the world a better place?


2:49:51 Phillip Bernstein: The Future of Making Things: Design Practice in the Era of Connected Technology

Berstein unpacks six technical disruptions – data, computational design, simulation analysis, the internet of things, industrial construction and machine learning – and looks at the implications for architecture.

3:51:44 Dr Simon Longstaff: Ethics in the Next Machine Age

Dr Longstaff explores the ethics associated with technology. This includes the consideration of ethical design, a future vision – Athens or Eden – and the purpose to making. Discussing the technology of WWII, Longstaff states:

Technical mastery devoid of ethics is the root of all evil

He notes that just because we can, it does not mean we ought.

A collection of points to consider in regards to ethics in technology
A screenshot from Dr Longstaff

He also used two ads from AOL to contrast the choices for tomorrow:


H/T Tom Barrett

David Krevitt walks through creating a custom formula for conditional formatting. He is correct in saying that there are not many posts or reflections written about this. The formula that he uses (which can be found here) highlights a value found in a separate list in a separate tab:

=match($F12, indirect("'rangeTab'!$B$12:$B") ,0) 

I have used the following formula to highlight a whole row based on the contents of one cell:

=$O1="Yes"

Krevitt now has me wondering what else I could do.

The Webby Award-winning PS22 Chorus was formed in the year 2000. We are an ever-changing group of 5th graders from a public elementary school in Staten Island, New York. PS22 is NOT a “school for the arts,” and the chorus is not a magnet program. PS22 Chorus just features ordinary children achieving extraordinary accomplishments — musically and otherwise.