So much of the discussion around the recent scandal involving the use of sandpaper to scuff the ball has been blamed on Cameron Bancroft, Steve Smith and David Warner. This documentary takes a wider look. Painting a picture of a perfect storm, it touches on David Warner being on edge, past history involving South Africa using a lolly to shine the ball, the creation of a competitive culture that incentivised winning and one of Australia’s youngest captains when he took the reigns.
In this presentation, Austin Kleon considers the question of “How to keep going” He answers this with ten points:

  1. Everyday is Groundhog Day
  2. Build a ‘bliss station’
  3. Forget the noun, follow the verb
  4. Make gifts
  5. The ordinary + extra attention = extra-ordinary
  6. Art is FOR life
  7. You’re allow to change your mind
  8. When in doubt, tidy up
  9. Demon’s hate fresh air so take a walk
  10. Spend time on something that will outlast you

I find Kleon one of those writers (and artists) who you can come back to again as a point of reflection.

Image via “Happy Little Trees” by nolnet https://flickr.com/photos/nolnet/5589665399 is licensed under CC BY-NC
Quote via Austin Kleon ‘How to Keep Going’

It was in Oct. 2016, in Berlin, during Michelberger Music. Between each show of the festival, we were kidnapping a person in the audience, which we were taking to a secret room where an artist was waiting. Between the two of them, a unique experience : a One To One concert.

There were seven performances recorded, featuring artists such as Bon Iver:

And Damien Rice:

There is something about the space of these performances that is really captivating. I imagine that watching these performances would be hard.

Watched
danah boyd discusses concerns about the weaponising of media literacy through denalism and says that there is a need for cognitive strengthening. This includes:

  1. “Actively taking things out of context can be helpful for analysis”
  2. “help students truly appreciate epistemological differences”
  3. “help students see how they fill in gaps when the information presented to them is sparse and how hard it is to overcome priors [confirmation bias and selective attention]”

Benjamin Doxtdator raises the concern that focusing on the individual:

Would boyd’s cognitive strength training exercises have helped here? No. Turning inwards to psychology, rather outwards to the political context, is precisely what gives us ‘lone wolf’ analyses of white supremacy.

Instead Doxtdator suggests considering the technical infrastructure. Interestingly, she does touch on platforms in the Q&A at the end:

One of the things that is funny is that these technologies get designed for a very particular idea of what they could be used for and then they twist in different ways.source

The original text that the keynote was based on can be found here, while a response to some of the criticism can be found here.

Along with Alexandra Samuel’s work and Doug Belshaw’s reflection. this webinar featuring Anya Kamenetz poses a number of considerations in regards to parenting in a digital age.

Move No. 1: “Here are some scary things that can happen with too much screen time — obesity sleep issues…behavioral issues, issues around the kid’s relationship to the media that they’re using … If you’re seeing any of that, then whatever you’re doing, you should do less,” she said.

Move No. 2: “You do need a system for what the rules are going to be that is clear and communicated to your kid. And, you can do it based on time, but you can also do it based on occasion, and/or priority. … Cut back if you need to cut back, make a system, and then, think about shifting toward the positive. What is it that our kids love about the time they’re spending online. How can you build on that? How can you stretch it toward other interesting uses? So that’s the enjoy part. I think it’s fairly simple. It’s a formula for making decisions. It’s a rubric. It’s not a rule,” Kamenetz added.