Replied to LMS Dogma by Reverend (bavatuesdays)

E.M. Forster’s “The Machine Stops,” Brett Victor’s “The Future of Programming,” and Audrey Watter’s PLATO review. I liked the way the idea of dogma weaved its way through all three pieces, and it resonated with the students as well.

Jim, I love Victor’s presentation on programming, as much for the style as the message (can they be separated?) However, I was left rethinking it in light of Victor’s take on making makerspaces more ‘scientific’ seeing space. It had me thinking how sometimes we can trivially end up picking and choosing between ideas and thinkers. For example, I would love to know Watters’ take on Seeing Spaces.
Replied to Writing to connect: knowing the “other” outside time & space (Reflecting Allowed)

Writing across each other’s blogs, I love how in some MOOCs, when people are focused on the same topic, one writes a post connecting ideas from multiple other posts, taking the ideas further, grabbing comments from elsewhere, and making something new, then recycling the ideas again. It’s a kind of “distributed” collaborative writing.

This is an intriguing reflection Maha. I like your points about writing across blogs, as well as connecting beyond ourselves. The one question I was left wondering is whether you would right the same post now? I too have written myself about the benefits of connected education. With both posts written a few years ago, I wonder if anything has changed? Would you still have the same outlook?
Replied to Creating a strategic plan for your life by Ian O’Byrne (W. Ian O’Byrne)

We all have dreams, yet many of us chose not to allow them to become reality. There are many factors that may impede or restrict our ability to find a way to implement this plan. There may be specific people that subscribe to old narratives and chose to see us follow in their footsteps. The thing to remember in this process is that we all create and follow our own learning pathways. We should be the ones to determine the direction, goals, and success of our lives.

Ian, I am enjoying your series looking at vision, goals and life. I must admit that I am a little sceptical about ‘SMART’ goals. I like Steve Brophy’s notion of fuzzy goals. You might also be interested in Adrian Camm’s work around vision.
Replied to Facebook, Medium, And Staying The Course Within Your Own Domain (kinlane.com)

We all want more traffic, readers, and hopefully revenue around our work. It is always tempting to think the grass is greener on another platform. However, we should never lose sight of the importance of owning, operating, and cultivating our own domain. There will always be new platforms who come along and prey upon our desire for more traffic, and the magical network effects they will bring, but it will NEVER be worth abandoning our own domain. Platforms come and go, pivot, shift courses, and rarely will think of you as more than just a data point. Nobody will ever care as much about your content, data, and audience as you do, and I’m hoping folks are starting to learn their lesson after the whole Facebook bullshit.

Great post Kin. Personally, I have really enjoyed digging into the #IndieWeb and taking my blogging and experience with –domains even further. One of my frustrations with Medium is the lack of webmentions. I can understand why – all about the eyeballs – and I do not agree. Like yourself, there are some random posts I POSSE there, but most of the time stay away.

The other half of the conversation is the functionality provided on Medium. If people want ‘annotations’, they can use things like Hypothes.is, if they want to provide the options to link, they can add fragmentions, while there are many themes that provide similar look and feel. To be honest, I think that Hackeducation.com is one of the cleanest reading experiences.

Although third-party applications make it ‘easy’ to sharecrop, the question is at what cost?

Replied to Using Flickr to embed images (Meredith Fierro)

I stumbled across this solution when I was quickly reaching my storage quota for my website during ds106. I needed a way to upload all the images I created and didn’t have enough room on my website. So I thought I would show you all how simple it is to embed the images in posts and pages.

I have used Flickr for embedding images for a while. One challenge I have had is with featured images. I used to use a plugin that made the first embedded image the feature, but it stopped working, so now I manually upload. Not sure if you any thoughts for that?

My other concern is what might happen if Flickr were to flop or be sold off? What would happen in that situation?

Replied to Not Dead, Just Hibernating (colinwalker.blog)

Maybe it’s just because I have put myself in a particular position – with micro.blog and the Indieweb movement – but I see a thriving community of individuals, bloggers, looking to retake control of their online presence.Adam described the interview as “hard going” and on my first read though I only got as far as the following quote about talking to a high school class:

“When they ask…

I wasn’t there in the halycon days and only really started blogging after blogging supposedly died, but I like your point Colin about hibernation. I POSSE now, but I imagine a movement where people use their blogs to connect and communicate with other blogs.
Replied to Reply to Storify Bites the Dust. If You Have WordPress, You Don’t Need Another Third Party Clown Service (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)

Better than relying on the auto-embed handled by WordPress, actually copy the entire embed from Twitter to capture the text and content from the original.

I really like your point Chris in regards to the difference between the shortcode and the embed code. I wonder if there is a potential to build on Martin Hawksey’s TAGS work to smash the different parts together in Sheets rather than manually copying the embed code for each Tweet. Something like this:

=“<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" data-lang="en"><p dir="ltr" lang="en">”&text&” — (@”&from_user&”) “&source&” “&created_at” <script async src="https://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js" charset="utf-8">”

I still need to think about how to accommodate “twitter-tweet” so that Sheets reads this as text too.

Doing it this way would allow users to download a list of their tweets and potentially paste the IDs into tags and then generate the embed code.

Replied to I relished Om Malik’s post by Colin WalkerColin Walker (colinwalker.blog)

Having blogs as places to think out loud we can pool our resources. By following blogs we outsource the gathering of these snippets and they are buffered for easier perusal in the outboard memories of others, ready to be raided at our leisure.

But, in doing so, we should not forget our own, not forget to load up our memories from time to time to keep at least some of them fresh that we may be inspired.

Nice reflection Colin. I find it interesting the way that focuses and intents associated with blogging develop and evolve over time. Although I do sometimes go back to my Twitter feed to find past conversations, I agree with you that it is a bit of dumping spot. For a long time my habit has been to save links to Diigo and shared on Twitter. Is Diigo my ‘Commonplace Book’?

Bringing my processes in house and then POSSEing has actually made me a lot more mindful

  • A. of what I share
  • B. the notes, quotes and tags associated with this

It has also led to a lot more internal linking. I think that this practice is a continuation of what I started with my Wikity and curated newsletter. I think that the challenge is to continually “apply what you learn“. In the end, I wonder if an element of blogging is located in the present. As Clive Thompson suggests:

Having an audience can clarify thinking. It’s easy to win an argument inside your head. But when you face a real audience, you have to be truly convincing.(wired)

Replied to Schools That Claim to Be Ideal for All Are Closer to Ideal for Nobody (Etale)

If you are more firm on your position and say that a single school can truly be ideal for every student, then I must reply with a demand that you prove such an extreme claim. Do you really believe this or are you just holding to the position because it best supports some larger set of beliefs and values that you hold dear?

Another interesting post Bernard. I agree about the dangers of ideals. In regards to choice, I am reminded of Ewan McIntosh’s post arguing that a school can only have two core values that make up its ‘competitive position’.

My only concern is that not every school is even in a position to be competitive. This is beyond ‘vouchers’ in my opinion and relates to policy and priorities. Where I live, they have a special science school decked out with the latest and greatest, including mahogany trims around the door. Then down the road there is the ‘local’ with its asbestos risen classrooms. The science school is select entry and clearly has a different funding arrangement. This does not even touch on the problems of private verses public.

In an ideal world there would be equal access for all, but when some select entries soak up all the cash it just does not seem right?

Replied to Friends don’t let friends use Chromebooks for CoolMath. by Lyn Hilt (lynhilt.com)

The real crisis surrounding technology integration is a leadership crisis.

It’s a vision crisis. It’s the crisis that most of our schools are built around teaching cultures, not learning cultures. It’s a lack-of-clarity crisis.

Great post Lyn. I have discussed some of my issues elsewhere. I liked Andy Losik’s response, to highlight the creative possibilities associated with the Chromebook. However, I think that you hit the nail on the head Lyn with your point about vision.

Too often in education, the search is for the one answer. Just as with the wolves of Yellowstone, technology can not solve all our ills. It is only one part of the puzzle:

EdTech Enablers

“EdTech Enablers” by mrkrndvs is licensed under CC BY-SA

I recently reflected upon the place of Google to support librarians. Technology can offer so much, but it needs to connect in with the local context. I think that friends don’t let friends take products straight off the shelf, but that is a conversation for another day.

Replied to Duplicate photos in post when using 'photo' post-kind · Issue #147 · dshanske/indieweb-post-kinds (GitHub)

I have an issue when I use the photo post-kind in a WP post. When including a photo in a post and setting the post-kind to 'Photo' I find the photo is duplicated in the post

@raretrack I have been experiencing the same thing.

It also seems to happen when I add audio too.

I inserted the image as ‘Full’ size. I think that you propobably defaulted to ‘Medium’. I assume that the initial image is ‘Full’ too.

I wonder if there is a way to ‘hide’ the inserted image and then it just shows the media content at the beginning of the post?

Replied to Reading blogs in 2018: thoughts and things to do by Bryan Alexander (Bryan Alexander)

If some of us like reading blogs, perhaps it’s worth trying as a first step to RSSify as much of your world as you can.  That doesn’t mean using RSS, necessarily, but adjusting things around you to follow that principle.

I recently moved from Feedly to Inoreader as I liked the ability to subscribe to an OPML file that I can store on my blog. I actually find my of me reading in my feeds, as opposed to social media streams.
Replied to Vulnerability by Corrie (cbarclay.global2.vic.edu.au)

Empathy is about feeling with people and understanding with emotion the plight they may be in. It takes a true human connection to be made for empathy to be real and genuine. It is that empathetic connection that makes the feeling of being vulnerable better.

Nice post to start back on Corrie. Whether it be restorative practice or positive education, the emotional side seems to something we are addressing more and more today. I wrote about emotions and coaching last year. One of my concerns with this area is that it becomes another thing to typecast students (and teachers) with. See for example PISA’s move into pyschometric testing.
Replied to How to Win an Argument Every Time, Why You Should Not, & What it Means for Education (Etale)

it is not good to win arguments every time. As much as I value the article and the infographic, and as much as I took a little time to track down the context for the infographic, the title focuses our attention on trying to win the argument every time. I disagree, and not just in situations where we recognize that we are wrong. Sometimes we are completely convinced that we are right, but we are not. To win would take us and others further away from the objective truth or the wisest course of action. I contend that the pursuit of such an approach, while we will never do it fully or perfectly, is an important part of civil discourse, the cultivation of wisdom, much needed leadership, and actual progress. If truth matters and we value wisdom in the modern world, then skill in rhetoric must always be paired with humility and a love for that which is wise, true, beautiful, and good.

This is a useful post Bernard. It reminds me of a post I wrote a few years ago on the dangers of tribes and evolving the conversation. It feels as if social media pushes us to these extremes at times, rather than the grey space.

Coming from a Literature background, so often things are structured are power and persuasion. I feel if I had (or have) my time again how I might bring some more nuanced conversations in the classroom. I think that the Visible Learning routines can be helpful in developing this.

Replied to Teaching Critical Thinking? These Mythbusters Activities Will Help (The Tempered Radical)

Our goal is to help students recognize that gaps in thinking aren’t something to be afraid of.  They are something to be openly acknowledged and then addressed through deliberate attempts to gather more information.

Bill this is fantastic idea. I like the use of a graphic organiser to scaffold the thinking. It reminds me of the Zoom In routine, where it is impossible to ‘know’ what the image is, therefore forcing student to justify their interpretations.
Replied to Find a Doorway That Fits Us Both (The Curious Creative)

As King suggests the first line is an invitation. As a teacher this might be the first interaction in a school day, or the opening activity of a period of learning. Crucial moments to draw learners in and engage their curiosity.

I think that this counts for blogs as well. With the statistics suggesting that people rarely read beyond the first few lines, it is important to make it count. For the last year I have been starting each post with an ‘excerpt’ that hopefully helps readers know if it is of interest.
Replied to 50 blog post ideas for educators (thecompellededucator.com)

Sometimes it can be tough to come up with ideas on what to blog about. As a regular blogger, I get asked the question alot… “What should/will I blog about?” Here’s a list of 50 blog post ideas for educators.

This is a great list Jennifer. Along with ‘100+ Ideas and Prompts for Student Blogging’ from Ronnie Burt, Sue Waters and Kathleen Morris and ’10 Blog Post Ideas for your School Blog’ from Richard Byrne, they provide a useful place to start for those unsure where to start.
Replied to Comments For Kids Still Count: Teaching And Promoting Quality Commenting (Primary Tech)

While we can’t control what goes on in the larger blogging community too much, we have much more control over our classroom blogging programs. The comment section is an excellent place to connect, learn, and grow. Who wouldn’t want to tap into that?

Thoughtful as always Kathleen. I found blogging in the classroom really interesting, especially for older students who were well already versed in social media. They actually struggled to properly converse. I still wonder why? I am sure that I could have implemented more elements that you touch upon, but I also think that there was a shallowness. There were habits associated with feedback and engagement that we can sometimes take for granted. When I think about Doug Belshaw’s Elements of Digital Literacies, it feels as if this comes back to communication and confidence, as much as it comes down to cognition and constructive use.

When we rue the old days I wonder if we would be willing to give everything up to go back there? We complain about ‘micro-engagement’, but how many of us are willing to turn our back on the ease and benefits that it can bring? I am reminded of lyrics from The Bleacher’s track, I Miss Those Days:

And everyone is changing
And the storefront’s rearranging
I picked up a quarter and I just saw my face
But it’s all coming back now
Like the feeling isn’t over
Hey, I know I was lost but I miss those days

I am sure that there are aspects that have been lost, but I also wonder if there have been benefits as well? Blogging has changed and always will or as Martin Weller puts it, “the future of blogging is blogging”:

I know blogging isn’t like it used to be. It isn’t 2005 anymore, and those early years were very exciting, full of possibility and novelty. But just because it isn’t what it was, doesn’t mean it isn’t what it is. And that is interesting in its own way, some of the old flush is still there, plus a new set of possibilities. Blogging is both like it used to be, and a completely different thing.

One innovation that I think has potential for supporting comemnts is Micro.blog. It allows users to share a feed from their blog to a central space and converse there. It is build on webmentions which allow comments to be syndicated back to your own site. Although I am not sure that the platform as it currently stands would be the answer, I think the features show a real prospect. I tried using the dashboard in Global2, but found the space was too busy.

I am wondering if you have any thoughts how we could improve comments outside of the classroom too?

Replied to Technology isn’t the problem by Greg Whitby (bluyonder.wordpress.com)

I believe the bigger question is how we as a society, respond to the seismic shifts happening. Since we can’t ignore the digital age, we must find ways of navigating the new frontier including what we deem as acceptable and appropriate use at home, at work and at school. Banning mobile phones is not a solution, it’s a reaction to the massive waves of ever-changing technologies. There’s an air of anti-intellectualism in all of this – a fear of the new sciences that was just as evident in the time of Galileo. 

This is a useful provocation Greg for a wider discussion. To ‘ban’ mobile devices seems more convenient than embracing the opportunity. My only concern is that too often we embrace the smartphone without stopping to critique the implications for data, surveillance and commerical influence. The question that we need to ask is whether it is ethical and maybe start from there?
Replied to Fragmentions for Better Highlighting and Direct References on the Web (Boffosocko)

Fragmention is a portmanteau word made up of fragment and mention (or even Webmention), but in more technical terms, it’s a simple way of creating a URL that not only targets a particular page on the internet, but allows you to target a specific sub-section of that page whether it’s a photo, paragraph, a few words, or even specific HTML elements like

or on such a page. In short, it’s like a permalink to content within a web page instead of just the page itself.

Another fantastic post Chris. I love the notion of mentioning a specific part of the text and find it particular useful to link back to sections from my longer posts or parts of my newsletters.

I find it interesting to consider alongside Hypothesis and wonder what the different use cases are?

I have added the plugin, but found the documentation associated with Kartik Prabhu’s additional code confusing, so left it. Is this what Khurt was referring to?

I look forward to seeing where all this grows?

Aaron

P.S. I thought that Flickr sent webmentions (as it is attached to Bridgy), however I was clearly wrong. Sorry.