Replied to Feature Suggestion: Media field to include in reply contexts · Issue #157 · dshanske/indieweb-post-kinds (GitHub)

GitHub is where people build software. More than 27 million people use GitHub to discover, fork, and contribute to over 80 million projects.

I think that this would be a useful addition. Although it is easy enough to use HTML tag;

It is just another thing to consider. Thinking about the ‘user’, anytime that such steps can be baked in is a good thing.

Replied to Three steps to develop a system to take control of your passwords by Ian O’Byrne (W. Ian O’Byrne)

There are several things we need to assume as we work with digital tools.

You will be hacked
You may have already been hacked and don’t know it
You will have to change your passwords quickly when you are hacked
You will most likely have to change passwords often
One the first steps in discussing privacy and security in online spaces usually involves your passwords. The challenge is that far too many of us have a…

Ian, I was recently caught up in a civil debate about password management. The question was why I did not simply store my passwords in Google. I said that it was my choice not to, but then got caught out not really having a reason why I did not store them within the browser.

I was wondering where that sat with your discussion of passwords and ‘security’. I raised the concern that storing passwords in Google was a lot of eggs to put in the one basket, but then isn’t that what happens with LastPass etc…

I am sure I am missing something here, just thought I would ask.

Replied to Is your School an X or Why School? (EDUWELLS)

Students and schools focussed on why they exist develop stronger engagement in all activities and this results in making achievement in what we do much easier.

I really enjoyed Sinek’s book.

One of the interesting points that I found was that ‘why’ is not necessarily something that you just sit around and decide. It involves culture and therefore action. In some respect it reminds me of trust. You cannot necessarily create ‘trust’, instead you put in place the conditions for trust to prosper. I think that the challenge we face is creating the conditions for why to prosper. I think that your book goes some way to doing this. However, I imagine that it will always be based on context and involve idiosyncrasies.

Replied to Digg is going to kill Digg Reader; what should we do now? by Bryan Alexander (Bryan Alexander)

Over to you, dear readers. Which way forward for RSS, both in the big picture and in the practical sense of which reader to try?

I am using Inoreader and love the ability subscribe to a feed. I therefore store my OPML on my site. This allows me to add and delete feeds, as well as maintain a permanent backup. The only catch I have found is that the feed does not seem to auto-refresh, so if you delete a link from your blog and therfore your OPML, then you need to remove it from Inoreader too.

I am keeping an eye on Aaron Parecki’s #Indieweb Reader too.

Replied to The myths we live by, limitless tools & silent study (Quinlearning)

Faced with limitless possibilities, creativity can really struggle. But there’s no reason why we have to use all these possibilities. In fact, a lot of what I learned about visual artists when I was at school was how they often seek to restrict themselves. The George Fitzgerald interview linked above really got me thinking, as rather than just showing off all his music equipment, he really gets into why he uses a room full of ageing 70s and 80s electronics when he could emulate it all in a laptop. It all comes down to restrictions. He takes each limited piece of equipment and finds the few ways in which it can do something special, then repeatedly uses these to create music that sounds unique.

It has been interesting to see the transition in soft synths Oliver. The interview with George FitzGerald reminded me a short clip involving Jack Antonoff. He too restricts himself to original equipment:

Antonoff condenses months of creativity into eight minutes. It left me think about how much learning is assumed to get to a point of understanding the technology to get to a point of control. I remember when I was young, I had a Roland G707. I would use a cassette player to record tape after tape of tweeking with the various sounds. There was something about the physicality of it that was never matched when I moved onto Fruity Loops.

Replied to Dear IndieWeb, it may be time to start considering the user, not just the technical spec (Oatmeal)

SO, whereas “[e]ach generation is expected to lower barriers for adoption successively for the next generation” I wonder if it is maybe time to update some of the tooling from generation 1 and 2 to be more compatible with generations 3 and 4?

Eli, I imagine that it is more complicated than just turning attention to the user. I am not a programmer. I have not done any technical training. All my knowledge is self-taught. I may not know what all the errors mean, but I can at least debug to a degree. My actually occupation is the delivery of a sector-wide LMS. I am a teacher whose job it is to make connections between the technical and the pedagogical. My experience is that this comes down to storytelling.

I feel that what is needed are more people in-between the divide of Gen 1 & 2 vs. 3 & 4. People who are living it, asking questions and identifying the various points of confusion. I think this is what will take the #IndieWeb from a hipster-web to a “demonstratably better web

Replied to Reducing friction by Mark Mark (mpospese.com)

What I’m doing is not exactly POSSE because status posts under 280 characters are cross-posted to Twitter as plain tweets and don’t link back here, but that’s fine by me. I don’t care if Twitter has copies of my photos and words as long as I have the originals hosted here on my blog.

I downsized from two blogs to one, and now instead of tweeting, I publish status posts to my blog (which get cross-posted to Twitter). I mostly use micro.blog’s iOS app for status posts, but any WordPress-compatible client would work.

Interestingly, I actually went from one to two in my transition to the Indieweb. I wanted to leave my main blog, Read Write Respond, for my longer posts, while I use Read Write Collect for everything else. I must admit that I am progressively consolidating more and more of my disparate parts.

I am intrigued by the idea of relying on micro.blogs to manage comments. Treating it like that reminds me a little of Disqus.

Replied to A Year in the Indieweb (Oatmeal)

Do you IndieWeb? Do you want to IndieWeb?

I’d love to talk IndieWeb with you.

Nice reflection. I too have been on a sloopy journey into the –IndieWeb, although I have not dived in as far as you to create your own CMS.

One of the things that struck me about the post was that it felt like IndieWeb was both a verb and a noun. I find this one of the intriguing aspects to it all. I found someone mention themselves as a citizen of the IndieWeb.

Whatever the IndieWeb is I think that it will only get better as the community continues to grow and evolve.

Replied to How-to micro.blog, a micro.guide (Oatmeal)

A micro.blog user-account is really just 1 or more RSS/JSON feeds all streamed through a single spot.

It allows you to aggregate RSS feeds into a single social “feed” that represents you.

This is a good starting point for Micro.Blog.

For me it is part Feed Reader / part Social Media platform, however as you point out, the content is always yours. I can imagine this platform, or at least concept, being used in an educational environment, allowing students to easily engage with various feeds in a central space.

Replied to Technology and Learning. Evidence and Impact by Corrie Barclay (Learning and Leading)

It’s not been until my current place of employment that I was asked, repeatedly, by parents and caregivers about what the impact would be of iPad devices being integrated in to their student’s learning. In saying that, it does not mean that other parents and caregivers has not been concerned in …

Interesting reflections Corrie.

I thought the one person to turn to in regards to the effectiveness of technology was Gary Stager. He certainly has some interesting things to say:

I am intrigued by your reference to Marzano in association with technology. Have you read his work on IWBs?

I have always had concerns with SAMR, my particular gripe is the lack of awareness to the wider context. I have really enjoyed following Ian Guest’s work assocaited with Twitter, in particular his reference to ‘non-human’ actors. This is why I think that there is hope with the Modern Learning Canvas to support teachers in developing a richer appreciation of practice. See for example the canvas I made assocaited with our learning model:


“Modern Learning Canvas – Instructional Model” by mrkrndvs is licensed under CC BY-SA

If we ask teachers to change their “roles, relationships and actions”, I think that we need a way of seeing and appreciating that. The canvas provides a great tool to identify transformation.

Lastly, in regards to wider research, I collected some links here if you need anything.

Aaron

Syndicated on collect.readwriterespond.com

Replied to ‘My Learning’ by Greg Miller (LEARN AND LEAD)

As students progress through Years 8, 9 & 10 in the coming years, there will increasingly be more and more time for students to self direct their Personalised Curriculum. This may include, but is not limited to:

Acceleration of core curriculum subjects leading to early commencement of HSC in one or two subjects.
If required, intervention strategies for those students who do not meet minimum national benchmark standards for literacy and numeracy.
Early commencement of VET (Vocational and Educational Training) subjects either at school or through TAFE.
Participation in Massive Online Open Courses (MOOCs), completion of digital badge courses or informal internships with local industry experts and ‘start ups’.
Self directed electives and collaborative projects as a result of students working with teachers with the following provocation: Knowing my Strengths, Motivations and Interests (SIM), how can I use my identified talents and affirmed capabilities to ensure a better world?

This is a great achievement Greg.

It has been fascinating following your thinking in this area. There are so many assumptions that go unquestioned. I am reminded of some of the work at Geelong College and Templestowe College.

My wondering is the ramification for aspects such as reporting and timetables. I remember visiting a school that had gone down a similar path for Year 6’s and listening to the amount of work that went into creating ‘personalised’ report templates. Will this just come back to your template around your six pillars? I was speaking with a representative from Compass who told me about CENet contract.

I know that it seems trivial, however I think that these tedious elements are often overlooked and I would love to know your thoughts.

Replied to Re-thinking the Homepage by Eddie Hinkle (eddiehinkle.com)

This is definitely not the end of my site revisions, it’s really just the start. But it allows me to use this for awhile and see what I like and don’t like.

I really like the look of this Eddie. I have always looked on at Chris Aldrich’s site and felt that it was a little bit beyond what I was after. However, you provide a different approach and show how it may not need to be so complicated. I do however like Aldrich’s breakdown of the different Post Kinds as a sort of menu.
Replied to Freeing Myself from Facebook by Jonathan LaCourJonathan LaCour (cleverdevil)

Ever since my discovery of the IndieWeb movement, I’ve wanted to free myself from Facebook (and Instagram) and their brand of surveillance capitalism. I want to own my own data, and be in control of how it is shared, and I don’t want it to be used for advertising.

Jonathon, there are many posts out there arguing to get off Facebook or clean up your data, however my question has always been what to do with the data. I really like Martin Hawksey’s work associated with archiving Twitter, but I have never really come upon any process for bringing Facebook content into my own domain. I am going to explore this, even if to keep a private archive. Thanks you.
Replied to Thoughts on linkblogs, bookmarks, reads, likes, favorites, follows, and related links (Chris Aldrich | BoffoSocko)

How I view these content types on my personal website/online commonplace book.

This is a useful reflection Chris. I find the correlation with social media spaces interesting. For example, what maybe a clap in one space maybe a star in another. I have down the path of organising my space around contributions, creations and response.

In regards to ‘responses’ I have discussed my different uses before. Basically, they follow the structure of Post Kinds, but there are times when I break them down further using tags:

  • 📑 / Bookmarks: Used for posts of interest, with added commentary and quotes added.
  • 👍 / Likes: Used for links that I have little to say about, but want to like. The same as a +1 on Google+ or a star on Mastodon.
  • 🤔 / Questions: A cross between a bookmark and a reply, questions are used as a means of posing wonderings and what ifs.
  • 💬 / Replies: Although in part serving the same purpose as a bookmark, replies allow for an interaction with the author.
  • 📚 / Reads: Used to collect together marginalia associated with books. I usually just bookmark articles.
  • 🎧 / Podcasts: Similar to a bookmarks and likes, this indicates podcasts.i haved listened to and engaged with.
  • 🎵 / Music: This is for reviews and reflections on music.
  • 📺 / Watched: Used for video I have watched, particular online. Although these are sometimes kept as bookmarks when they involve mixed media.
  • 📰 / Newsletters: My newsletter provides an opportunity to review the various bookmarks saved throughout the month. Although this could be automated using a platform like MailChimp (as Doug Belshaw does), I choose to do this manually and further add to my commentary.

I must admit that I am always making minor changes. It is far from set.

Replied to Memento Mori: Learning about life, by knowing you will die (W. Ian O’Byrne)

One of the things that I do believe, and most people do not understand, is that most of the wonderful things I have in my life are present because of my mother’s death. Most of my large family comes from my father remarrying. Events in my life have unfolded to put me in certain places in certain times.

Sorry to hear your loss Ian.

I really enjoyed your reflectoon. It has certainly led me to think a little more deeply. I was particularly taken by your point about your mother’s death defining you in so many ways. I think that can also be said about a lot of those life choices not just death. Being the grandson of a European refugee who fled Communist Czechoslovakia, I am often left wondering what if, only to realise that there is no what if, just what.

Thanks you again for sharing.

Aaron

Replied to Death is a friend of life by jennymackness (Jenny Connected)

Iain McGilchrist’s stress on the importance of poetry, music and presence at a time of the death of someone you love, or indeed of anyone, resonated with me. I am fortunate to know at least two people who really understand this. As many testified at her death, my mother was unique. Had she not existed there would be a Betty-shaped hole in the Universe.

My sincere condolences Jenny. Sadly, death seems to be a topic of reflection at the moment.

Your post has me reflecting on the death of my mother. Although it maybe a part of life, I am not sure I was willing to accept death. I naively thought she would be around seemingly forever. I remember missing our last moment together:

My last real one to one chat happened when I was least expecting it. With my step dad out picking up my brother and sister from school, I had a few moments with my mum. All of the sudden the tone of the conversation changed from being chatty, talking about this and that, but nothing in particular, to being more serious. I am not sure if it was something that I said or whether it was something that mum was just waiting to say, but she learnt forward from the couch and told me that I was a great brother, an amazing son and a fantastic husband and that I should not listen to anyone who says otherwise. In my usual manner, I tried to dodge these compliments. Like my mum, I just don’t like being pumped up. However, it didn’t occur to my till much later that these were mum’s last meaningful words for me. Although we had a few more conversations, none of them were as deep as this moment.

I am not sure how I thought she would pass, but no-one and definitely no movie prepared me the change and transformation associated with cancer.

I find your mention of music interesting. My sister and I played Miley Cyrus’ The Climb over and over in our last night with my mother as she lay there slowing passing. I remember the track playing randomly on my phone in class one day. I had to check myself, let alone somehow explain why I had Miley Cyrus on my phone to a bunch of teens.

Thank you Jenny for sharing.

Aaron

Replied to
Thank you Doug for the mention in your blog and the podcast. I organise my microcasts using the Audio Post Kind:

http://collect.readwriterespond.com/kind/audio/feed/

However, you can also make a feed from a tag or category:

https://collect.readwriterespond.com/tag/microcast/feed/

I also syndicate to Huffduffer. This can be used in regards to podcasting apps.

In my exploration of Anchor 3.0, it would seem that you can only download audio recorded in the browser. You cannot download audio recorded on mobile.

Replied to Radio #EDUtalk 07-03-2018 Loose Learners Ep 9 The State of Blogging by John Johnston (EDUtalk)

This episode explores a favourite topic for both John and Mariana – blogging. It explores the current state of things.

Thank you John for the mention. The blogger who I think you were trying to remember is Bill Ferriter. He wrote an interesting post reflecting on the myth of audience.

I sometimes wonder if people like Dave Winer and Alan Levine are the real ‘Big B Bloggers’. This is not because they curate a platform for financial purposes, which they don’t, but because they each in their own ways take blogging to the extremes of what is possible. I consider their pursuit as both cognitive and technical. I think that Micro.blog and #IndieWeb communities capture this too. This is the Big B blogging that I am interested in.

Replied to Supporting Digital Practice – making time-for-learning by dave dave (davecormier.com)

Digital practices need to be negotiated, they need to be talked about out loud in ways that many of our 20th century practices don’t.

I really like your point about negotiation Dave. It reminds me in part of Doug Belshaw’s work on digital literacies. In my current role, the team I am in is responsible for supporting schools with Google. Having to cover a wide range of contexts and content, we often meet in the middle at some sort of imaginary average. I question how much people therefore get from these sessions. What I like about the option of online courses is that you can at least complete them as a staff group, reflecting together from your own perspective.

One take-away from the recent #EngageMOOC was that such negotiation and dialogue needs to happen at multiple levels. I think sometimes this is the challenge. We might generate conversation at the classroom, but it is not being had at the school level, something you touched upon in a past post. Also, the link between institutions and education systems seems stretched at times with the current neoliberal obsession with realism and the way it is.

Replied to Let’s break 2 molds that hurt everyone’s wellbeing (EDUWELLS)

In 1980 the average Auckland house price was the same as ONE Auckland Teacher salary. In 2018, it is the equivalent of NINE Auckland teacher salaries.

I like your point Richard of looking at wellbeing from a systemic point-of-view. I just finished reading a report on teachers in West Virginia living from paycheck to paycheck. What stood out was the attempts to link bonuses with exercise. We want impact and effect sizes, but are happy to ignore equity because it is beyond our control.